Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Kearns, Emily (Oxford)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Kearns, Emily (Oxford)" )' returned 36 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Aigeus

(368 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Αἰγεύς). Mythischer König von Athen, einer der zehn Eponymoi und Vater von Theseus. Die kanonische Gesch. macht ihn zum Sohn von König Pandion, der Attika zw. A. und seinen Brüdern Pallas, Lykos und Nisos teilte. A. erhielt das Gebiet um Athen. Aber seine Erscheinung dort könnte auch später erfolgt sein: Beazley ARV2 259.1 zeigt die anderen Brüder mit Orneus, nicht mit A. Als König blieb er lange Zeit kinderlos. Bei einer Befragung des delph. Orakels wurde ihm gesagt, ›den Fuß des Weinschlauches nicht zu lösen, bevor er zu Hause sei‹ (Eur. Med. 679-81). A. konnte dies nicht verstehen. Als er in Troizen ankam, erkannte sein Gastgeber Pittheus, daß A.' Sohn und Nachkomme aus seinem nächsten Geschlechtsverkehr geboren werde; deshalb machte er A. betrunken und brachte ihn mit seiner Tochter Aithra zusammen. So …

Chione

(149 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Χιόνη; Chiónē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Boreas and Oreithyia Daughter of Boreas and Oreithyia; mother of  Eumolpus by Poseidon. To avoid discovery she threw her child into the sea, but it was rescued by Poseidon (Eur. Erechtheus fr. 349 TGF; Apollod. 3,199-201). The name C., from χιών ( chiṓn) ‘snow’, is fitting for a daughter of the north wind; another C., daughter of Arcturus, was said to have been abducted by Boreas and given birth by him to…

Buzyges

(229 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Βουζύγης; Bouzýgēs). [German version] [1] Athenian heros Athenian hero, original ancestor of the family of  Buzygae; also the title of the priest for Zeus Teleios or ἐπὶ Παλλαδίῳ ( epì Palladíōi), who therefore would have been a member of t…

Philonis

(107 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Φιλωνίς; Philōnís). Daughter of Deion (or of Eosphorus and Cleoboea), mother of Autolycus [1] by Hermes and of Philammon by Apollo. Perhaps in Hes. fr. 64 M.-W., cer…

Anaces

(253 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)

Ajax

(763 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Αἴας; Aías, Latin Aiax). Name of two Athenian heroes at Troy. [German version] [1] Greek hero for Troy, son of Telamon A. Τελαμώνιος (Telamonius), son of Telamon from Salamis and Periboea (Eriboea). In the Iliad he is the best fighter of the Achaeans after Achilles (Il. 2,768-9): he is a defensive fighter, carries a gigantic shield, ‘like a tower’. He does not have an aristeia of his own, but comes out on top in the battle with Hector (Il. 7,206-82). His best-known myth is set after the events of the Iliad. After Achilles' death, A. collected the body, while Odysseus held back the Trojans ( Aethio…

Eurysaces

(121 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Εὐρυσάκης; Eurysákēs). In Athenian tradition a son of  Ajax (Soph. Aj. 340; 575). E.'s name (‘broad shield’) reflects an attribute of his father (cf. Astyanax, Neoptolemus, Telemachus). He had a sanctuary in the city deme of Melite, where he is supposed to have settled after he and his brother Philaeus had handed their hereditary homeland of Salamis to the Athenians (Plut. Solon 83d). The story is doubtless a transparent political invention. The circumstance attendant on it was E.'s office as priest in the

Eurystheus

(356 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Εὐρυσθεύς; Eurystheús). Mythical ruler of Argos. He was the antagonist of  Heracles, and charged him with the twelve labours. The rivalry between the two had been caused by Hera: after Zeus had declared that a son of his blood would be born that very day, and would rule over all that he surveyed, Hera delayed  Alcmene's labour and accelerated that of the wife of Sthenelus, who was a Perseid and therefore a descendant of Zeus (Hom. Il. 19,95-133). In some versions of the myth, at that moment Hera and Zeus agreed that Heracles would owe service to E., and would later be immortal. It was thus as a mortal that, following the instructions of the Delphic oracle, Heracles came into E.'s service, either to atone for having murdered his own children in a fit of madness (e.g. Apollod. 2,73) or simply because E. ordered it. The setting of seemingly insoluble tasks by a tyrannical ruler is a frequent motif in Greek mythology, but in significance Heracles' labours go far beyond their predecessors. Vases depict E. hiding terrified in a barrel as Heracles brings him the Erymanthian boar.  Cerberus being dragged off to the upper world is also depicted on some vases. Upon Heracles' death E. began to seek out Heracles' children, and pursued them throughout Greece. According to an Athenian myth (Eur. Heracl., cf. Hdt. 9,27), the Athenians protected the Heraclidae and defeated the Argives led by E. It was believed that E. was buried in Pallene or at Gargettus; according to another version, his head was cut off and brought to Alcmene, who put out the eyes with weaving-pins (in Str. 8,6,19 the head was buried separately in Tricorythus). That Euripides should have invented the entire story of E.' burial i…

Acamas

(291 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Ἀκάμας; Akámas). Son of Theseus, normally closely connected to his brother  Demophon. A similar history is assigned to both brothers. Their mother appears in different forms: Phaedra (Diod. Sic. 4,62; Apollod. epit. 1,18), Ariadne (schol. Od. 11,321) or Antiope (Pind. fr. 175). Although they are not found in the Iliad, according to the Ilioupersis

Erechtheus

(357 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)

Butes

(335 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Βούτης; Boútēs). [German version] [1] Attic hero Attic hero about whom several traditions exist. There was an…

Arrhephoroi

(448 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)

Dexamenus

(359 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Michel, Simone (Hamburg)
(Δεξαμενός; Dexamenós). [German version] [1] Mythical king of Olenus in Achaea Mythical king of  Olenus in Achaea, host of  Hercules; his name indicates that hospitality is his main function in the narrative. Hercul…

Akamas

(284 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Ἀκάμας). Sohn von Theseus, normalerweise eng verbunden mit seinem Bruder Demophon. Beiden Brüdern werden…

Adrastus

(673 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Gottschalk, Hans (Leeds)
(Ἄδραστος; Ádrastos). [German version] [1] Mythical figure, leader of the campaign of the Seven against Thebes …

Aegeus

(399 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Αἰγεύς; Aigeús). Mythical king of Athens, one of the 10   eponymoi and father of Theseus. The canonical history depicts him as a son of king  Pandium, of Attica, who shared Attica between A. and his brothers Pallas, Lycus and Nisus. A. received the region around Athens. But his appearance there could also have occurred later: Beazley ARV…

Daedalus

(1,013 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Δαίδαλος; Daídalos). [German version] [1] Mythical craftsman, sculptor and inventor Mythical craftsman, sculptor and inventor, his very name belonging to a semantic field indicating objects created by astuteness and skill. In stories he is associated with Athens, Crete and Sicily. Judging from the development of artistic techniques, it is not impossible that the origins of the tradition lie at least partly in Crete, although whether D.'s name can be attested in the Linear B texts is a matter of dispute […

Erichthonius

(505 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Ἐριχθόνιος; Erichthónios). [German version] …

Erysichthon

(282 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Ἐρυσίχθων; Erysíchthōn: ‘tearing up the earth’ or ‘protector of the country’). Mythical figure whose story is best known through Callimachus' 6th hymn to Demeter. According to it, he was a Thessalian, son of Triopas. He felled a grove that was sacred to Demeter even though the goddess in human form had warned him against it. As punishment for that he was made eternally hungry; he used up all he owned trying to assuage his hunger. Callimachus portrayed him as an unmarried youth; in other versions, including the earliest (Hes. fr. 43a M-W), he had a daughter Mestra, whose lover Poseidon had lent her the power to change into any shape she wished; she supported her father by allowing herself to be sold off in various animal shapes, escaping and returning to be sold yet again. The Hesiodic poem differs from later accounts in that it makes Mestra, and thus E. as well, Athenian. That suggests an identification with a figure that otherwise seems completely different, namely that of the Attic E., usually (or at least later) identified as the son of  Cecrops who died young and childless. E. probably enjoyed a hero cult for a while at Prasiae on the eastern coast of Attica, where his grave was located (Paus. 1,31,2). His mythical function, possibly principally under Phanodemus' influence (FGrH IIIb no. 325 F2), was establishing the Athenian relationshi…

Aeacus

(309 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Αἰακός; Aiakós). Son of Zeus and  Asopus' daughter Aegina, was regarded as the founding hero of the island of Aegina. The history of the inhabitants or the re-inhabitants of the island is generally associated with him; for his benefit Zeus transformed all the ants into people (Hes. fr. 205 M-W). By his wife Endeis, A. fathered   Peleus and  Telamon; many stories give him a further third son with the name Phocus (seal), whose mother was the  Nereid Psamathe. Phocus lost his life th…

Dexamenos

(345 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Michel, Simone (Hamburg)
(Δεξαμενός). [English version] [1] myth. König von Olenos in Achaia Mythischer König von Olenos in Achaia, Gastgeber des Herakles; sein Name deutet darauf hin, daß Gastfreundschaft seine Hauptfunktion in der Erzählung ist. Herakles vergal…

Adrastos

(626 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Gottschalk, Hans (Leeds)
(Ἄδραστος). [English version] [1] Anführer des Feldzuges der Sieben gegen Theben Anführer des Feldzuges der Sieben gegen Theben. A. besaß urspr. Verbindungen zu Sikyon, wo sein Kult alt war (s.u.). In der kanonischen Gesch. jedoch stamm…

Arrhephoroi

(398 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Ἀρρηφόροι). Titel mit ungewisser Etym., der zwei oder vier athenischen Mädchen aus guter Familie zw. sieben und elf Jahren gegeben wurde, die ein Jahr lang auf der Akropolis lebten und an verschiedenen Aktivitäten teilnahmen, die mit dem Kult der Athena Polias verbunden waren. Mit der Athenapriesterin stellten sie an den Chalkeia den Webstuhl auf, auf welchem der neue Peplos der Göttin gewoben wurde, und halfen selbst beim Weben mit. Mit dieser Rolle wurde oft die zentrale Szene des Parthenonfrieses zusammengestellt und …

Aiakos

(287 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Αἰακός). Sohn von Zeus und Asopos' Tochter Aigina, wurde als Gründungsheld der Insel Aigina betrachtet. Mit ihm wird allg. die Gesch. …

Chione

(141 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Χιόνη). [English version] [1] Tochter von Boreas und Oreithyia Tochter von Boreas und Oreithyia, von Poseidon Mutter des Eumolpos. Um eine Entdeckung zu vermeiden, warf sie ihr Kind ins Meer,…

Butes

(329 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Neudecker, Richard (Rom)
(Βούτης). [English version] [1] att. Heros Att. Held, über den mehrere Überlieferungen existierten. Es gab einen Altar von B. im Erechtheion, in der Nähe der Altäre von Poseidon, Erechtheus und Hephaistos (Paus. 1,26,5), und dies schafft eine klare Verbindung zu den Überlieferungen der Eteobutaden, die das Priesteramt der Athena Polias und des Poseidon Erechtheus innehatten. B. könnte tatsächlich der Titel des Priesters von Poseidon Erechtheus gewesen sein [1]. In diesem Zusammenhang müssen die Geneal…

Erechtheus

(343 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Ἐρεχθεύς). Mythischer König von Athen mit bedeutendem Kult auf der athenischen Akropolis. Es ist schwierig, E. als Heros oder Gott einzuordnen: Sein Kulttitel in der früheren Periode ist Poseidon E. (z.B. IG I3 873; Eur. Erechtheus fr. 65,93-4), ihm wird jedoch eine mensch…

Eurysakes

(115 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Εὐρυσάκης). In der athenischen Tradition ein Sohn des Aias (Soph. Ai. 340; 575). E.' Name (“breiter Schild”) spiegelt ein Attribut seines Vaters wider (vgl. Astyanax, Neoptolemos, Telemachos). Er h…

Erysichthon

(268 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Ἐρυσίχθων: “Erdaufreißer” oder “Schützer des Landes”). Mythische Figur, deren Gesch. am besten durch Kallimachos' 6. …

Eurystheus

(347 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Εὐρυσθεύς). Mythischer Herrscher von Argos. Er war der Gegenspieler des Herakles und beauftragte ihn mit den zwölf Arbeiten. Die Rivalität der beiden war von Hera verursacht worden: Nachdem Zeus erklärt ha…

Philonis

(100 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Φιλωνίς). Tochter des Deion (oder des Heosphoros und der Kleoboia), Mutter des Autolykos [1] von Hermes und Mutter des Philammon von Apollon. Vielleicht in Hes. fr. 64 M.-W., sicher bei Pherekydes FGrH 3 F 120, der sie in der Gegend des Parnassos ansiedelte; nach Konon FGrH 26 F 1 und 7 lebte sie im att. Thorikos; daher ist die Rekonstruktion ihres Namens als Kultempfängerin in einem verderbten Teil des Opferkalenders von Thorikos einleuchtend (SEG 33, 44f. Nr. 147). Hyg. fab. 65 nennt Ph. als Gattin des Hesperus oder Lucifer und Mutter des Keyx. Kearns, Emily (Oxford)

Daidalos

(926 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Neudecker, Richard (Rom)
(Δαίδαλος). [English version] [1] myth. Handwerker, Bildhauer und Erfinder Mythischer Handwerker, Bildhauer und Erfinder; schon sein Name gehört in ein semantisches Feld, das auf Scharfsinn und geschickt hergestellte Objekte hinweis…

Erichthonios

(466 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Ἐριχθόνιος). [English version] [1] Erdgeborener aus Athen Bedeutende Figur der athenischen Myth.; seine Erdgeburt soll auf der Akropolis stattgefunden haben und versinnbildlichte die autochthone Natur des Atheners. E.' Beziehung zu seinem Fast-Namensvetter Erechtheus ist problematisch; die meisten frühen Texte (z.B. Hom. Il. 2,546-51) sprechen von Erechtheus, nicht E., als dem Erdgeborenen, und ein eigentlicher Kult von E., der sich von Erechtheus unterscheidet, ist nicht ersichtlich. Bei Euripides (Ion 267ff.) und den att. Lokalhistorikern werden die …

Anakes

(242 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[English version] (Ἄνακες). Kulttitel der Dioskuren Kastor und Polydeukes. Der Name, eine Nebenform von άνακτες ( ánaktes), “Könige” oder “Herren”, ist ein Titel, der in Attika häufig benutzt wird, wo das Paar in vielen Demen und im Anakeion auf der Agora kult. ver…

Aias

(721 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
(Αἴας; lat. Aiax). Name zweier athenischer Helden vor Troia. [English version] [1] Heros vor Troia, Sohn des Telamon A. Τελαμώνιος (Telamonios), Sohn des Telamon von Salamis und der Periboia (Eriboia). In der Ilias ist er nach Achill der beste Kämpfer der Achaier (Il. 2,768-9): Er ist Defensivkämpfer, trägt einen riesigen Schild, “wie ein Turm”. Er hat keine eigene Aristie, ist aber im Kampf gegen Hektor überlegen (Il. 7,206-82). Sein bekanntester Mythos spielt nach dem Geschehen der Ilias. Nach Achills Tod holte A. den Leichnam zurück, während Odysseus die Troianer zurückhielt (Aithiopis); danach kam es zum Streit zw. den beiden um Achills Rüstung (Ilias Parva). A. unterlag, wurde verrückt und versuchte, die griech. Anführer zu foltern und zu töten; als er entdeckte, daß er in seinem Wahnsinn stattdessen Schafe getötet hatte, beging er Selbstmord. Diese Gesch. wird in Od. 11,543-64 vorausgesetzt; sie ist auch Thema von Sophokles' Aias. Nicht-ep. Quellen fügen Details hinzu. Herakles betete, Telamons ungeborener Sohn möge so stark werden wie sein eigenes Löwenfell; Zeus sandte als Antwort einen Adler (αἰετός), was den Namen A. erklären soll (Hes. fr.250 M-W; Pind. I. 6,35-54). Ebenso wurde eine Verbindung zw. dem Namen des Helden und αἰαῖ (aiai, “weh”) hergestellt - so Soph. Ai. und Ov. met. 13,394. Ferner wurde erzählt (z. B. Lycophr. 455-6 und schol. = Aischyl. fr. 83 TrGF), daß …

Buzyges

(203 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
▲   Back to top   ▲