Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)" )' returned 469 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Tiara

(266 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τιάρα/ tiára). Head covering of Near Eastern peoples (Armenians, Assyrians, Sagae, especially Persians; Hdt. 3,12; 7,61; 7,64 et passim), similar to a turban; also a tall tiara, decorated with stars and rising to a point, which among the Persians was fit only for the king, his relatives and holders of high office (Xen. An. 2,5,23; Xen. Cyr. 8,3,13). In Greek sources, the tiara is also called a kyrbasía or a kíd(t)aris (e.g. Aristoph. Av. 487). The tiara as a head covering for Middle Eastern aristocrats was also common in the Roman period (Suet. Ner…

Tribon

(99 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τρίβων/ tríbōn, τριβώνιον/ tribṓnion). A coat ( himátion, cf. pallium ) of 'bristly' wollen material, worn by Cretans (Str. 10,4,20) and Spartans (Plut. Lycurgus 30; Plut. Agesilaus 30; Ael. VH 7,13); later also common in Athens (Thuc. 1,6,3). It was part of the clothing of simple people (Aristoph. Eccl. 850; Aristoph. Vesp. 1131), farmers (Aristoph. Ach. 184; 343) and lakōnizóntes ('imitators of Spartan customs', Dem. Or. 54,34). From the time of Socrates (Pl. Symp. 219b; Pl. Prt. 335d; Xen. Mem. 1,6,2) the tribon was also the typ…

Tabula

(196 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] General Latin term for board (Plin. HN 31,128; 33,76; 36,114; Ov. Met. 11,428), then for 'game board' ( tabula lusoria, Games, Board games, Dice (game)), 'painted panel' ( tabula picta, Plin. HN 35,20-28), 'votive tablet' ( tabula votiva, Hor. Carm. 1,5,13; Pers. 6,33). In a special sense, tabula is the term for writing tablets, used for writing and calculating, of wood, whitewashed or with a layer of wax, or metal tablets (Writing materials, Codex ), as were already common among the Greeks. Tabulae were used in the public domain, e.g. as tablets of law ( Tabulae duodecim

Advertizing

(528 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Probably the simplest and most effective way of advertising a product or announcing something was shouting aloud in market-places and streets (cf. propaganda). Moreover, the geographical origin of a product spoke for its quality; there is, for instance, a tradition of formulations such as 'Tarentine' or 'Amorgian cloth', 'Chian wine', 'Falernian wine', etc. as a seal of approval or a mark of quality. Advertising could also occur in a written form on the walls of buildings (Graffiti), in letters, epigrams, etc. In contrast to commercial advertising are the kalo…

Paragaudes

(150 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (παραγαύδης; paragaúdēs). Descriptive term first recorded only in the 3rd cent. AD for a gold or purple border in the form of the Greek letter gamma (Γ), which was woven into garments (SHA Claud. 17,6). Later also transferred to a particular garment ( paragaúdion) made from fine silk material, similar in style to a sleeved chiton, which Roman emperors gave as an award of honour, decorated with at least one and up to five of these borders depending on distinction and service (SHA Aurelian. 15,4,46; SHA Probus 4,5). For that…

Acclamatio

(339 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Rhythmic acclamations, sometimes spoken in unison, expressing congratulations, praise, applause, joy or the contrary. Besides the initially prevalent, spontaneous acclamatio, during the course of time a stereotyped acclamatio, which was always repeated on certain occasions, gained currency. There is an early mention of acclamatio in Hom. Il. 1,22, and acclamatio is also known to have marked decisions in Greek popular assemblies [1] and cult gatherings. In Rome, at wedding processions the acclamatio took the form of Talasse and Hymen, Hymenaee io (Catull. 61-6…

Tunica

(300 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The tunica, cut and sewn from two pieces of generally white woollen or linen material, was worn by both men and women of the Roman upper classes as an undergarment (Suet. Aug. 94,10) underneath the toga , and as the sole garment by the lower classes. Women often seem to have worn two tunicae, one above the other, with the inner one then referred to as tunica subucula (Varro Ling. 5,131) and the outer one as supparus. In very cold or inclement weather, men, too, would wear layers of tunics (Suet. Aug. 82,1). Originally, tunics were close-fitting and sleeve…

Fan

(391 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ῥιπίς, rhipís; flabellum). Fans were used in the Orient and in Egypt from ancient times as symbols of status. The fan probably did not reach Greece until the 5th cent. BC; Eur. Or. 1426-1430 (first mention) still calls the fan ‘barbaric’, but it quickly became one of a woman's most important accoutrements (cf. Poll. 10,127); she would either cool herself with it or have a female servant fan her (cf. the flabellifera in Plaut. Trin. 252 and the flabrarius as her male counterpart in Suet. Aug. 82). On Greek vases and terracotta (‘Tanagra figurines’) fans are…

Monopodium

(145 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek trápeza monópous, Poll. 10,69). Round or rectangular tables with only one central support, whose foot could be carved into floral or mythical motifs. In Greece such tables had been used since the Archaic period but only became more common in Hellenistic times; in Rome, monopodia were very popular ever since their first introduction to the public, being carried along in the triumph of 187 BC (Liv. 39,6,7; Plin. HN. 34,14). Most of those that survive come from the towns around Vesuvius. Varro, (Ling. 5,125) mentions the cartibulum which stood in the compluvium

Guessing games

(331 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Only a small number of these are known from antiquity ( Riddles). In order to determine who should start, people liked to choose the game capita aut navia. It is named after the ancient Roman coins with the head of  Ianus ( capita) and a ship's prow ( navia, probably a plural paralleling capita). People threw a coin up into the air: one had to guess (as in the modern game ‘heads or tails’) which image came to lay on top. A guessing game for two players was par-impar (ἀρτιάζειν/ artiázein or ποσίνδα/ posínda): the first person holds in his right hand a number of relativel…

Cothurnus

(248 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὁ κόθορνος; ho kóthornos, cot[h]urnus). The Greek cothurnus was a high-shafted soft leather boot that fitted tightly to the leg and foot (and, by extension, was used as a synonym for an adaptable person in Xen. Hell. 2,3,30-31). It was wrapped with bands or tied at an opening at the front. The cothurnus is mentioned as women's footwear (Aristoph. Eccl. 341-346; Lys. 657), but was worn in particular by elegant youths at a symposium and  komos. It was the preferred footwear of Hermes, …

Perizoma

(206 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (περίζωμα/ perízōma, Latin perizoma). Greek apron for covering the lower body, worn around the abdomen and held with a belt, as a cloth wrapped round the hips and then passed between the legs, or in the form of a garment similar to a pair of shorts. Perizomata were worn by labourers, artisans, sacrifice attendants, priests, slaves, and also soldiers (cf. Pol. 6,25,3; 12,26a 4) and athletes as their only clothing (Nudity C.) or as an undergarment. In iconography it is mostly men that are shown wearing perizomata, less often female figures such as Atalante and Gorgo…

Lasimus Krater

(112 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A volute krater much cited from the late 18th to the early 20th cent. because of its inscription which mentions another lower Italian vase painter (Paris, LV, Inv. K 66 [N 3147], [1]). Research at that time discussed the written form of the letters and the artistic classification of the supposed vase painter Lasimus. Only recent research proved the inscription to be a recent addition. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 Trendall/Cambitoglou, 914, no. 36. S. Reinach, Peintures de vases antiques recueillés par Millin (1813) et Millingen (1813), 1891, 64-67 S. Favi…

Tropaion

(462 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Originally, the tropaion (τρόπαιον/ trópaion; Lat. tropaeum) was a sign erected by the victorious army at the place on the battlefield where the adversary turned to flee (from Greek τρέπειν/ trépein, 'to turn around'). In the language use of later Antiquity, it referred to victory monuments in general, such as the Tropaea Augusti (cf. e.g. Tac. Ann. 15,18). The term tropaion has been common since the 5th cent. BC (Batr. 159; Aesch. Sept. 277). The tropaion consisted of a tree stump or post, sometimes with crosspieces (cf. Diod. Sic. 13,24,5) on which the…

Sabanum

(90 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A Roman coarse linen cloth, used to dry off and rub down the body after bathing (Apul. Met. 1,23, cf. Mart. 12,70) or to wrap around the body, in order to raise a sweat after a steam bath; a sabanum was also used to squeeze out honeycombs and to envelop food during the cooking process (Apicius 6,215; 239). Late Antiquity understood a sabanum to be a linen garment decorated with gold and precious stones (Ven. Fort. Vita S. Radegundis 9) or a coat. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Keroma

(84 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κήρωμα; kḗrōma, Lat. ceroma). In the medical sense, a salve or cerate, Hippoc. Acut. 8 (vol. 2, p. 424) or a salve (Mart. 4,4,10). In Imperial Rome, keroma designated a wax tablet, and also the clayey wax-coloured surface of a wrestling ring that soils the body or neck of the athletes (Juv. 3, 68); from this, the term keroma was extended to the ring or arena itself (Plin. HN 30,5). Also, those employed there were called kērōmatistaí. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Fasciae

(238 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Bandages, bindings, straps of different kinds were made of various materials (felt, leather, linen, wool), and could be white or coloured. Fasciae as a category includes the straps of the bed ( lectus,   kline ) on which the mattress was laid,  swaddling cloths (σπάργανα, spárgana) and fasciae crurales, bindings designed to protect the lower legs ( fasciae tibiales) or thighs (  feminalia) against the cold. The use of fasciae was regarded as unmanly, and for men was restricted to invalids, but even Augustus (Suet. Aug. 82,1) and Pompey (Cic. Att. 2…

Hygiene, personal

(789 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A. General In antiquity clean and regularly changed  clothes were part of physical well-being, as were washing or bathing followed by anointing the body with regular or perfumed olive oil and other fragrant oils ( Cosmetics), the latter being also used out of health reasons. Peoples or people who were dirty or unkempt were bound to be disagreeable to the Greek and Roman sense of cleanliness (Hor. Sat. 1,2,27; 1,4,92), as well as those who used unusual or strange methods of washing, …

Peucetian pottery

(186 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Type of indigenous pottery, named after ancient Peucetia, the region of the eastern Apennines between Bari and Egnazia (Peucetii). PP emerges in the 7th cent. BC. Initially its decoration is influenced by geometric patterns (swastikas, lozenges, horizontal and vertical lines), which form a narrow ornamental grid pattern, particularly in the late Geometric phase (before 600 BC). Leading forms of PP are kraters, amphorae, kantharoi and stamnoi; bowls are less common. The second phas…

Labronios

(56 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λαβρώνιος, -ον; labrṓnios, -on). Persian luxury vessel of precious metal and unknown form (large, flat, with large handles, Ath. 11,484c-f, 784a, 500e). As it is named by Athenaeus loc cit. in connection with lakaina and lepaste (both types of vessels), the labronios is probably a type of drinking bowl. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Soap

(184 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Solid soap in the modern sense was unknown in Antiquity. For cleaning their bodies people used pumice, bran, bicarbonate of soda, oil, soda or clay - Cimolian earth was particularly well known (Aristoph. Ran. 712) - and water. The Greeks called these cleaning materials ῥύμμα/ rhýmma or σμῆγμα/ smêgma (there is no corresponding Latin term). In public bathing facilities washing materials were available on request from attendants (Aristoph. Lys. 377; Ath. 8,351e), or people brought them from home. As with modern soap, ancient wash…

Writing materials

(1,589 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Hurschmann
[German version] I. Writing media In Antiquity, a large variety of media were used as writing support. Modern scholarship divides them into inorganic and organic materials. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [German version] A. Inorganic An inorganic medium for writing is natural rock on which inscriptions were chiselled; they are found in Egypt and in the mountains of to the east Mesopotamia from the 2nd half of the 3rd millennium BC. An early example from Greece are the inscriptions of Thera (IG XII 3,536-601; 1410-1493) from the end…

Chlamys

(271 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (χλαμύς; chlamýs). Shoulder-coat made of wool for travellers, warriors and hunters. The many-coloured and embroidered chlamys appeared in the 6th cent. BC and originally came from Thessaly (Poll. 7,46; 10,124; Philostr. Heroïkos 674) where it was also awarded as a winner's prize after athletic contests (Eust. in Hom. Il. 2,732), or Macedonia (Aristot. fr. 500 Rose). Typically it was worn as follows: the cloth of the ovally or rectangularly tailored coat was folded vertically, laid around the lef…

Mantellum

(165 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ( mantellum, mantelium, χειρόμακτρον; cheirómaktron). A rectangular linen cloth with braiding and fringes; in cult activity it served as a hand towel carried by the servants of the sacrifice,at meals is served for cleaning hands (e.g. Xen. Cyr. 1,3,5) and as a tablecloth (Mart. 12,28). In Sappho (99 Diehl) the cheirómaktron is mentioned as a head adornment. In its main functions as a tablecloth and towel the mantellum corresponds with the mappa that was also a popular gift at Saturnalia (Mart. 5,18,1). There is evidence that from the time of Nero (Suet. Nero 22) a mappa (fl…

Clothing

(2,265 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
A. General [German version] 1. Raw materials Attested in early monuments from the Minoan and Mycenaean period, hides and leather, as well as wool, sheepskins and goatskins, are amongst the oldest materials used for clothing. The use of  linen or flax to make garments developed thanks to the agency of the Phoenicians; Alexander [4] the Great's wars of conquest introduced  silk into Greece. The Romans used the same materials for clothing as the Greeks;  cotton came into use as well in the 2nd cent. BC; s…

Pera

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πήρα/ pḗra, πηρίδιον/ pērídion, Latin pera). A bag or satchel for carrying bread (Theoc. Epigr. 1,49; Ath. 10,422b), seeds (Anth. Pal. 6,95; 104) or herbs and vegetables (Aristoph. Plut. 298), which belonged to the equipment of hunters (Anth. Pal. 6,176), shepherds (Anth. Pal. 6,177) or fishermen and was worn at the hip by means of a strap over the shoulder. The pera was already an item characterizing beggars in Hom. Od. 13,437; 17,197; 410; 466 (cf. Aristoph. Nub. 924), and later became, along with the walking staff ( báktron, Latin baculum, staff), a symbol used by …

Depas

(225 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (δέπας; dépas). Wine bowl, mentioned several times in Homer and probably also attested in Hittite, for drinking, libations, mixing and ladling, made from precious metal and decorated (‘Nestor's cup’, Hom. Il. 11,632ff.). As synonyms Homer uses ἄλεισον ( áleison), ἀμφικύπελλον ( amphikýpellon), κύπελλον ( kýpellon); from which the depas has been understood to be a two-handled cup, similar to the cantharus ( Pottery, shape and types of). Archaeological finds and interpretation of Linear-B tablets from Pylos and Knossos (where it appears as di-pa) seem to have br…

Karbatine

(60 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (καρβατίνη/ karbatínē, cf. Lat. pero). Shoe made from rough leather, mostly worn by shepherds and farmers, later also shoe for soldiers (Xen. An. 4,5,14), apparently laced up (cf. Lucian. Alexander 39). In Aristot. Hist. an. 499a 29 also a camel shoe. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography O. Lau, Schuster und Schusterhandwerk in der griech.-röm. Lit. und Kunst, 1967, 119-121.

Cosmetics

(562 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] In Greek and Roman antiquity there was a huge demand for essences, oils and pomades. As part of their skin care men lotioned themselves to keep their skin soft and tender (Ath. 15,686). Lotioning extended from the head over the entire body and it was a widespread custom to apply lotion several times a day, with a different lotion being used for each part of the body (Ath. 12,553d). Without lotion one was considered dirty. According to tradition, animal fats and butter were the fir…

Matta

(84 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ψίαθος/ psíathos). Matte oder grobe Decke aus Binsen und Stroh, in Ägypten auch aus Papyrus (vgl. Theophr. h. plant. 4,8,4). Sie diente den Bauern, Reisenden und armen Leuten zum Lagern auf dem Boden; in einer att. Inschr. auch unter dem Hausmobilar aufgeführt [1]. Nach Augustinus (contra Faustum 5,5) ist jemand, der auf der M. schläft, ein Anhänger einer Lehre, die Bedürfnislosigkeit predigt ( mattarius). Die Schlafmatte konnte auch χαμεύνη/ chameúnē genannt werden (Poll. 6,11). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 Hesperia 5, 1936, 382 Nr. 6 A.

Pergament

(334 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Zu einem der Beschreibstoffe der Ant. zählte das gereinigte, enthaarte und gegerbte Leder (Hdt. 5,58,3). P. entstand durch eine verfeinerte Bearbeitung der Tierhaut (von Esel, Kalb, Schaf, Ziege), bei der auf die Gerbung verzichtet wurde; statt dessen legte man die Tierhaut einige Tage in eine Kalklösung, entfernte sodann Fleischreste, Haare und Oberhaut, und legte sie danach in ein Kalkbad zur Reinigung (Kalzinierung). Anschließend spannte man die Haut in einen Rahmen, trocknete…

Epiblema

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἐπίβλημα). Griech. Begriff für Decke, Tuch, Mantel (Poll. 7,49f.). In der modernen arch. Terminologie bezeichnet E. das Schultertuch der dädalischen, bes. der kretischen Frauenstatuetten. In der Regel wird das E. auf der Brust, aber auch über dem Hals und dem Schlüsselbein befestigt; der obere Rand ist mitunter verziert. Auf Denkmälern des 7. Jh.v.Chr. findet sich das E. häufig dargestellt. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Fer(i)culum

(131 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] seltener feretrum (z.B. Ov. met. 3,508; 14,747). Damit werden Tragevorrichtungen unterschiedlicher Form bezeichnet, die zum Befördern von Sachgütern nötig waren, speziell aber solche Gerüste, auf denen bei Aufzügen (Triumph, Bestattung o.ä.) Gegenstände präsentiert wurden, z.B. Beutestücke, Gefangene, Götterbilder u.a. (Suet. Caes. 76); ferner diente das f. zum Transport des Verstorbenen oder der Dinge, die mit ihm bestattet oder verbrannt werden sollten (Stat. Theb. 6,126). F. nannte man auch (Hausrat) das Speisebrett, die flache Schüssel, m…

Petasos

(180 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πέτασος). Griech. Hut aus Filz mit breiter Krempe, aufgrund seiner Herkunft auch als “thessalischer Hut” bezeichnet (Soph. Oid. K. 313); er wurde von Frauen und Männern getragen, die sich viel im Freien aufhielten (Fischer, Hirten, Jäger) oder auf Reisen waren; zu den bekanntesten myth. P.-Trägern zählen Hermes, Peleus, Perseus, Oidipus, Theseus. Weitere Träger sind - seltener - Wagenlenker (Athen. 5,200f.), Reiter (z.B. am Parthenonfries) und die att. Epheben ( ephēbeía ). Für einen sicheren Halt des p. sorgte ein Riemen, der unter das Kinn geführt wur…

Canosiner Vasen

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Gattung der apulischen Vasen, zwischen ca. 350 und 300 v.Chr. wohl ausschließlich für den Grabgebrauch hergestellt. Als ihr besonderes Kennzeichen kann die in wasserlöslichen, verschiedenen Farben (blau, rot/rosa, gelb, hellviolett, braun) ausgeführte Bemalung auf weißem Grund gelten. Bevorzugte Gefäßformen sind Volutenkrater, Kantharos, Oinochoe und Askos, deren Gefäßkörper häufig mit auf kleinen Podesten stehenden Frauenfiguren und plastischem Dekor (geflügelte Köpfe, Gorgoneia…

Bustum

(90 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Der bereits im Zwölftafelgesetz (Cic. leg. 2, 64) als “Grab” definierte Terminus war nach Paul. Fest. 6, 78; 25,3; 27,11 und Serv. Aen. 11,201 der Ort, an dem die Leiche verbrannt und die Reste bestattet wurden, während die Brandstätte allgemein ustrinum heißt. Arch. ist diese Bestattungsform vielfach belegt. Bestattung Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography T. Bechert, Röm. Germanien zwischen Rhein und Maas, 1982, 244-246  M. Struck(Hrsg.), Römerzeitliche Gräber als Quellen zu Rel., Bevölkerungsstruktur und Sozialgesch., 1993 (Arch. Schrift…

Ring

(768 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (δακτύλιος/ daktýlios, ἀκαρές/ akarés; lat. anulus). Unter R. werden im folgenden ausschließlich Finger-R. verstanden (zu Ohr-R. s. Ohrschmuck). Bereits die R. der Aigina- und Thyreatis-Schatzfunde aus dem beginnenden 2. Jt. v. Chr. zeigen hervorragende Beherrschung der Technik und hohe künstlerische Qualität. Aus der frühmyk. Zeit sind Golddraht- und Silber-R. zu nennen, daneben auch die sog. Schild-R., die sich zu einer Leitform des myk. Schmucks entwickeln und ihren Namen nach der …

Löffel

(269 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] L. fanden zunächst als Rühr- oder Koch-L. (griech. τορύνη/ torýnē, Aristoph. Equ. 984, vgl. Anth. Pal. 6,305; 306, lat. trua oder trulla) bei der Zubereitung von Speisen Verwendung. Zum Schöpfen von flüssigen Nahrungsmitteln oder Wein diente der κύαθος/ kýathos. Wenn der L. auch schon früh bekannt war, so fand er trotzdem beim Speisen wenig Verwendung, da man vornehmlich ausgehöhltes Brot (μυστίλη/ mystílē, μύστρον/ mýstron) zum Verzehr von Breien, Brühen oder Suppen u.ä. benutzte (Aristoph. Equ. 1168-1174). Der Römer unterschied Löffel mit ovaler Schale ( ligul…

Labrum

(339 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (aus lavabrum, Diminutiv labellum, griech. λουτήριον/ lutḗrion und λεκάνη/ lekánē). Das L., ein großes flaches Becken mit aufgewölbtem Rand und hohem Fuß, diente unterschiedlichen Zwecken. Als Material für das L. werden Marmor, Porphyr, Ton, Stein u.a. gen. Im griech. Bereich ist L. ein Waschbecken, an dem sich Männer und Frauen mit Wasser reinigten; auf unterital. Vasen findet dies häufig in Anwesenheit von Eros statt, mitunter tummeln sich Wasservögel (Schwan oder Gans) im Wasser des L.…

Pera

(142 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πήρα/ pḗra, πηρίδιον/ pērídion, lat. pera). Ein Beutel oder Ranzen zum Tragen von Brot (Theokr. 1,49; Athen. 10,422b), Saatgut (Anth. Pal. 6,95; 104) oder Kräutern und Gemüse (Aristoph. Plut. 298), der zur Ausrüstung von Jägern (Anth. Pal. 6,176), Hirten (Anth. Pal. 6,177) oder Fischern gehörte und mittels eines Riemens über der Schulter an der Hüfte getragen wurde. Die p. war schon bei Hom. Od. 13,437; 17,197; 410; 466 Erkennungszeichen des Bettlers (vgl. Aristoph. Nub. 924) und galt später, zusammen mit dem Wanderstab ( báktron, lat. baculum, Stab), als Symbol…

Oscillum

(157 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Gruppe von runden oder peltaförmigen, d.h. nach der Form des Amazonenschilds gebildeten und reliefierten Schmuckscheiben aus der Zeit vom 1. Jh.v.bis zur Mitte des 2. Jh.n.Chr. aus Marmor. Die Oscilla stammen zum größten Teil aus den Vesuvstädten und wurden in Villen und Stadthäusern mit Gartenanlagen gefunden, in denen sie, an Ketten in den Interkolumnien des Gartenperistyls aufgehängt, zur Dekoration dienten. Andere fanden sich als Schmuckelemente in Theatern und in Tempelanlag…

Kemos

(83 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κημός, spätgriech. χάμος; lat. c[h]amus, -um). Unter k. sind diverse Sachgüter zusammengefaßt, die offenbar von der Grundbedeutung des Umschlingens, Verhüllens usw. ausgehen. Darunter fallen der Maulsack der Pferde, aus dem sie ihr Futter zu sich nehmen (Hesych. s.v.), wie auch die Fischreuse, ferner ein Tuch, das sich die Bäcker um Mund und Nase banden (Athen. 12,548c) bzw. das die Frauen zur Verhüllung der unteren Gesichtshälfte in der Öffentlichkeit trugen. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. Schenkl, s.v. K., RE 11, 157-162.

Dienst- und Ehrentracht

(479 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Durch die D. wurde ihr Träger aus der Gesellschaft hervorgehoben und in seiner Funktion kenntlich gemacht. Dies trifft bes. auf Priesterinnen, staatliche Beamte, aber ebenso auf Gesandte (Heroldsstab) o.ä. zu. In Griechenland trugen die Priester ein weißes Gewand (Plat. leg. 12,965a), den ungegürteten Chiton, der auch rot, seltener safran- oder purpurgefärbt sein konnte. Ein Kennzeichen war auch der Kranz ( stephanophóroi, “Kranzträger”, hießen deshalb die Priester z.B. in Milet); ferner traten Priester mitunter mit den Attributen der jew…

Fasciae

(227 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Bandagen, Binden, Gurte der unterschiedlichsten Art; sie waren aus verschiedenen Materialien (Filz, Leder, Leinen, Wollstoff) und konnten weiß oder bunt sein. Unter die f. fallen zum einen die Gurte des Bettes ( lectus, Kline), auf denen die Matratze auflag, ferner Windeln (σπάργανα, spárgana) und schließlich f. crurales, Binden, die die Unterschenkel ( f. tibiales) bzw. Oberschenkel ( feminalia) gegen Kälte schützen sollten. Bei Männern galt die Verwendung der f. als weibisch und war nur für Kränkelnde angebracht, doch trugen solche f. auch Augustus (Suet. …

Mörser

(232 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ὅλμος/ hólmos, ἴγδις/ ígdis, θύεια/ thýeia, ὕπερον/ hýperon, lat. mortarium, pistillum, pila). M. und M.-Keulen oder -Stößel aus unterschiedlichen Materialien gehörten zu den notwendigen Utensilien des Haushaltes (Plaut. Aul. 94-95; Hausrat), um Teig zu kneten, Getreide zu mahlen, Früchte, Gewürze u.a. zu zerkleinern und zu mischen; des weiteren dienten M. zur Zubereitung von Kosmetika und Pharmaka, Farben oder Metallmischungen. Zu den M. gehören die kleineren Reibschalen (mit und ohne Tülle und rundem Reibstein, lat. coticula genannt, Plin. nat. 34,1…

Cista

(198 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κίστη, kístē). Ein aus Weidenruten oder Baumrinde geflochtener, runder Korb mit einem Deckel, der vielfach die gleiche Höhe wie der untere Teil hat und über diesen gestülpt werden kann; auch mit Klappdeckel oder einem scheibenförmigen Deckel überliefert. Die c. sind auf zahlreichen Denkmälern, u.a. auf att. und unterit. Vasenbildern, Totenmahlreliefs oder Lokrischen Tontafeln dargestellt; daneben sind Modelle bekannt. Auf Hochzeitsszenen fungieren sie als Gabe an die Frau. Sie vertreten offenbar den Lebensbereich de…

Ohrschmuck

(860 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] I. Alter Orient s. Schmuck Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [English version] II. Klassische Antike Im griech. Mythos wird O. (ἐνώτια/ enṓtia, ἐνωτάρια/ enōtária, ἐνωτίδιον/ enōtídion, lat. inaures) nur selten erwähnt (Hom. Il. 14,183; Hom. Od. 18,298; Hom. h. ad Venerem 8), doch belegen zahlreiche Funde und Darstellungen, daß O. bereits in frühen Zeiten zum Schmuck von Männern (Hom. Od. 18,298) und Frauen gehörte. In der klass. Zeit und später galt das Tragen von O. bei Männern als ein Kennzeichen von Verweic…

Keroma

(79 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κήρωμα, ceroma). Im medizinischen Sinn ein Umschlag, Hippokr. Acut. 8 (Bd. 2, p. 424) oder eine Salbe (Mart. 4,4,10). In der röm. Kaiserzeit bezeichnet k. ein gewachstes Täfelchen, ferner den lehmigen, wachsfarbenen Untergrund für einen Ringplatz, der den Körper oder Nacken der Athleten beschmutzt (Iuv. 3, 68); davon ging der Begriff K. auf den damit bedeckten Ringplatz bzw. die -anstalt über (Plin. nat. 30,5). Auch erhielten die dort Beschäftigten den Namen kērōmatistaí. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Calener Vasen

(132 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Sammelbegriff für unterital. Schwarzfirnisware (Reliefkeramik), geläufig von der 2. H. des 4.Jh. bis ins 2.Jh. v.Chr. Die Bezeichnung C.V. (Askoi, Schalen, Omphalosphialen, Gutti) hat sich für diese Gefäßgruppe eingebürgert, doch ist sicher, daß sie auch in anderen Regionen (Paestum, Sizilien, Tarent) produziert wurde. Bekannt sind v.a. Schalen mit Medaillons in mittelhohem Relief (“Arethusa-Schalen”), deren Herkunft durch Formschalen und Werkstattsignaturen aus Cales (Calenos) b…

Konopion

(64 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (τὸ κωνώπιον, lat. conopium, conopeum). Urspr. war das K. ein Schlafnetz zum Schutz gegen Mücken, Fliegen usw. (Anth. Pal. 9,764; Prop. 3,11,45), wozu nach Hdt. 2,95 die Ägypter sogar ihre Fischernetze nahmen; dann in vielfältiger Verwendung benutzter Begriff für Sänfte und Ruhebett (über das ma. canapeum zu “Kanapee”). Man nannte auch eine Wiege conopeum. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography Lit.: s. Ruhebett.
▲   Back to top   ▲