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Applause

(607 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κρότος, ἐπικροτεῖν [ krótos, epikroteîn], plausus, plaudere). The impulsive and impromptu expression of praise and approval, also of rejection, cursing and reprimand communicated through words, sounds, gestures and actions; these forms of expressing approval are so closely related to   acclamatio that it is often difficult to distinguish between them [1]. In the ancient world, the most frequent gesture used to express approval was the clapping of hands, for example, in the theatre, during music, danc…

Kalathos

(323 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὁ κάλαθος/ ho kálathos; diminutive τὸ καλάθιον/ tò kaláthion and ὁ/τὸ καλαθίσκος, -ν/ ho/tó kalathiskos, -n; Lat. calathus). A basket which opens like a blossom, made from a variety of materials such as clay, wood, precious metals (Hom. Od. 4,125). It can also be woven from rods [1]. It was used as a working basket by female wool spinners (e.g. Juv. 2,54; Ov. Ars am. 1,693 and 2,219) - and as such is a requisite of scenes of the women's quarters (e.g. Rhyton London, BM E 773 [2]) - or as a household receptacle for cheese, milk, or oil, which made the kalathos a common wedding pre…

Strophium

(208 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(στρόφιον/ stróphion). A band wound round something or twisted together. [German version] [1] Breast band A breast band worn by women in Greece and Rome (Aristoph. Thesm. 139; 251; 255; 638; Aristoph. Lys. 931; Catull. 64,65), also called μίτρα/ mítra (Anth. Pal. 5,13,4; Apoll. Rhod. 3,867), μηλοῦχος/ mēloûchos (Anth. Pal. 6,211), στηθόδεσμος/ stēthódesmos (Poll. 7,66), mamillare (Mart. 14,66 lem.), fascia pectoralis (Mart. 14,134 Lem., cf. Ov. Ars am. 3,274; Prop. 4,9,49). Women are variously portrayed in art wearing strophia or putting on strophia. Straps across the shoulde…

Umbrella, Parasol

(241 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σκιάδιον/ skiádion or σκιάδειον/ skiádeion; Latin umbella, umbraculum). Round, collapsible umbrellas and those with fixed frames had been familiar to the Greeks from the 5th cent. BC; as in the states of the Near East, in Greece too umbrellas were a status symbol and sign of dignity. Noble Greek women had them carried by a servant girl (Athen. 12,534a, cf. Ael. VH 6,1). For Greek men, carrying an umbrella was considered a sign of effeminacy (Pherecrates PCG 7, 70 (64)). In Antiquity, um…

Lakaina

(116 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λάκαινα; lákaina). A drinking vessel listed as a cup in Ath. 11,484f.; the technical term is used in archaeological research to describe a vessel with a goblet-like body and round-bellied lower part, with two horizontal handles. Produced predominantly in Sparta from the 8th cent. BC onwards, the L. became a model for Laconian vasepainting of the 7th cent. BC. The design was discontinued after the middle of the 6th cent. BC. Its decoration was usually ornamental, but black- glazed examples do occur. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. M. Stibbe, Lakon. Vasenma…

Chests

(267 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ζύγαστρον/ zýgastron, κιβωτός/ kibōtós, κιβώτιον/ kibṓtion, λάρναχ/ lárnax, χηλός/ chēlós; Latin arca, cista). Chests made of wood, bronze or other materials were used in the household for storing and transporting clothes, household goods, book rolls (  scrinium), equipment, provisions, etc. Chests could be simple and undecorated, or decorated with ornamental or figurative reliefs on their sides ( Praenestine cistae). Wooden chests often had metal fittings, which were also decorated, for reinforcing edges and corne…

Games

(1,734 words)

Author(s): Nissen | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Egypt and Ancient Orient The boundaries between games and  sport are fluid; here only relaxation games ( Board games) are treated that are very well known e.g. for Egypt as originals from tomb contexts and pictorial representations e.g. the Senet board game ( znt) was popular. The position regarding the sources for the Ancient Orient is very limited for climatic reasons (wood barely preserved). We can make only assumptions about the rules of games. In addition to the game boards there are game stones, astragaloi ( Astragalos [2]), dice and little dice rods tha…

Sportula

(118 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ( sporta, sportella). Roman basket (Isid. Orig. 20,9,10; Petron. Sat. 40) used for shopping (Apul. Met. 1,24 and 25), the term is also used for a  basket which held money or food for clients (Petron. 40;  Juv. 1,95 f.; Salutatio ). Hence sportula denoted a feeding of the public (cf. Suet. Claudius 21,4) or a fee due to the magistrates for their official activities. In the 4th and 5th cents. AD, the fees that were charged by court magistrates for their services were also called sportula (Cod. Iust. 3,2). Donativum Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. A. Cahn et al., …

Catinus

(154 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Dish of clay or metal for meals Dish of clay or metal for meals (fish, meat, desserts). Vessel for the kitchen and cooking, for sacrificial offerings and for melting metals; identified by graffiti probably as the vessel forms Dragendorff 31 and 32 ( Clay vessels). Bowls (  acetabulum ) were also called catinus.  Terra sigillata;  Clay vessels Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography G. Hilgers, Lat. names of vessels, BJ 31. Supplement 1969, 48f., 142-144 F. Fless, Opferdiener und Kultmusiker auf stadtröm. histor. Reliefs, 1995, 19f. [German version] [2] Meltin…

Shoes

(752 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] According to ancient literature (Poll. 5,18; 7,85-94; 10,49; Herodas 7,54 ff.), there was a great multiplicity of varieties of sandals and boots; only in a small number of cases is it possible to identify footwear mentioned by name with that represented in monumental art or with surviving originals (e.g. calceus ). From Classical Greece alone we have 82 words for footwear, named after origin, people, shape, colour, material or use: many kinds of footwear were adopted from other countries and given the name of their country of origin, e.g. 'Persian shoes', Περσικαί/ Pe…

Darius Crater

(159 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Apulian voluted crater from  Canosa (found in 1851) in Naples (NM, Inv. 81947 [H 3,253], H 130cm, [1]), known as the eponymous work of the  Darius Painter named after it. The main face has the crown council of Darius in the centre [1] I., with paymasters and tribute bearers below and Athena with Hellas before Zeus and Apate before Asia above. Archaeological study interprets this as a representation of the victories of  Alexander' [4] the Great in Persia or an echo of contemporary …

Wig

(282 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (φενάκη/ phenákē, πηνήκη/ pēnḗkē, Latin capillamentum, galerus). The use of wigs apparently began in Greece at the end of the 6th cent. BC; late Archaic korai show hairstyles that are inconceivable without added hairpieces. In the theatre, too, people made use of wigs in the 5th cent. BC (Aristoph. Thesm. 258) and also used false beards (Aristoph. Eccl.25), musicians and conjurers similarly wore wigs and hairpieces (Ael. VH 1,26; Lucian Alexandros 3). The use of wigs and hairpieces was extremely popular i…

Wineskin

(173 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀσκός/ askós; Lat. culleus, uter). For transporting solid (Thuc. 4,26) and liquid foods (Hom. Il. 3,247; Hom. Od. 5,265; 9,196), apart from barrels, people also used animal (ox, sheep, goat; in the Arab lands also camel, Hdt. 3,9) skins sewn together, a leg of the animal serving as inlet and outlet. Representations of wineskins are common in ancient art in transportation scenes; a wineskin-carrying silen is a fixed feature of the iconography of Dionysian scenes (Dionysus). In myths, …

Epiblema

(76 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἐπίβλημα; epíblēma). Greek term for  blanket, cloth, coat (Poll. 7,49f.). In modern-day archaeological terminology, epiblema denotes the shoulder-covering of Daedalic female statues, esp. those from Crete. As a rule the epiblema is fastened at the breast, but also across the neck and collarbone; the upper edge is occasionally decorated. The epiblema is frequently depicted on 7th-cent. BC monuments. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Mortar

(231 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὅλμος/ hólmos, ἴγδις/ ígdis, θύεια/ thýeia, ὕπερον/ hýperon, Latin mortarium, pistillum, pila). Mortars and pestles of various materials were among the household utensils (Plaut. Aul. 94-95; Household equipment) necessary for kneading dough, grinding corn, chopping and mixing fruits, vegetables, etc. Mortars were also used for preparing cosmetics and drugs, pigments and metal alloys. Mortars included smaller grinding bowls (with or without a lip and round grinding stone, called a coticula in Latin, Plin. HN 34,106; made of granite for eye ointment…

Arca

(216 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λάρναξ; lárnax). Box, case, chest, then especially the treasure chest of wood or metal-jointed wood in the atrium (Juv. 11,26; 14,259 and passim), of which there are known examples or remains of examples in Pompeii. Arca was the term used for a large number of sacred, state and private treasures, e.g. the one of the virgines vestales. The arca could be large enough for a person to hide inside (App. B Civ. 4,44). Small arcae are preserved from late antiquity which were given to one's wife as a present with congratulatory messages and their metal fitting…

Dipylon Painter

(303 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Attic vase painter of the geometric period (Late Geometric I, mid 8th cent. BC;  Geometric vase painting), named after the cemetery at the Dipylon Gate in Athens, where most of his works were found. The Dipylon Painter (DP) and the other painters of his workshop created about 20 monumental vases (kraters; amphorae), which were placed on tombs as receptacles for offerings ( Burial); of these, the amphora Athens, NM 804, with a height of 155 cm (the stand has been replaced and thus …

Solium

(184 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Seat Roman high seat with foot-, arm- and backrest, throne; the solium was the seat of kings (Ov. Fast. 3,358; 6,353) and, presumably as early as in Etruria, the symbolic seat of a pater familias . It was inherited from father to son, selling it was considered shameful ( Salutatio ). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography F. Prayon, Frühetrurische Grab- und Hausarchitektur, 1975, 111 f.  Th. Schäfer, Imperii Insignia. Sella curulis und Fasces. 29. Ergänzungsheft MDAI(R), 1989, 26 f. [German version] [2] Bathtub Roman bathtub for one (Mart. 2,42; Vitr. 9 …

Clavus

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ‘Nail’, in the context of  clothing: ‘stripes’. The decoration of a  tunic with purple clavi extending from the shoulder to the lower seam at the front and back, served to denote rank in Rome. Senators, their sons (since Augustus) and officials wore a tunic with broad stripes ( lati clavi), equestrians one with small stripes ( angusti clavi). The clavi could be woven in or sewn on, cf.  Dalmatica. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. R. Goette, Studien zu röm. Togadarstellungen, 1990, 8-9 J. Bergemann, Röm. Reiterstatuen, 1990, 23-24 B. Levick, A Note on the …

Calenian Pottery

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Generic term for lower Italian black-glazed pottery ( Relief ware), evident from the second half of the 4th cent. to the 2nd cent. BC. The term Calenian Pottery (CP) (askoi, bowls, omphalos phialae, gutti) is commonly used for this group of vessels, yet they were undoubtedly also produced in other regions (Paestum, Sicily, Tarentum). Particularly well-known are bowls with medallions, worked in a medium relief (‘Arethusa bowls’); their origin from Cales (Calenus) or rather Campania…

Nestoris

(182 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A type of ‘Italian’ vase, also called trozella, which was adopted by Lucanian vase painting in the 5th cent. and by Apulian vase painting only around the middle of the 4th cent. BC. The nestoris appears to have been taken on from Messapian vase art. It is known in various forms; typical is its ovoid body with side handles and strap handles (which rise up from the shoulder of the vessel and connect to its lip) which are often decorated with discs (rotellae) [1. 11 fig. 3]. In vase …

Pilleus

(212 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also pileus). Close-fitting half-spherical or ball-shaped head covering made of fur, felt, leather or wool; adopted by the Romans from the Etruscans (cf. Liv. 34,7). In Rome the pilleus was the mark of a free citizen and was given a slave (Petron. Sat. 41), prisoner of war, or gladiator (Tert. De spectaculis 21) upon manumission. Thus the pilleus libertatis, together with the vindicta , is the attribute of Libertas, who holds them in her hands on Roman coins. P illeus can be used synonymously as an expression for freedom (Mart. 2,68; Suet. Nero 57, cf. Plau…

Furniture

(1,500 words)

Author(s): Cholidis, Nadja (Berlin) | Veigel, Isabell (Berlin) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient Furniture can be documented for the Ancient Orient since the 6th millennium BC, in the form of a sculpture of a feminine figure from Çatal Hüyük that is enthroned on a chair flanked by felines. More substantial statements, however, are not possible until the 3rd millennium BC, as written sources are added. Of the furniture made mostly of wood, reed, woven textiles or leather, scarcely anything is preserved due to the aggressive climate in the Near East. Valuable ind…

Chiton

(507 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (χιτών; chitón). Greek undergarment, originally of linen, then wool; probably of Semitic origin ( Clothing). Frequent occurrences in Homer (e.g. Il. 2,42; 262; 416; 3,359; Od. 14,72; 19,242), show that the chiton was already a part of Greek costume in early times, and a favoured garment for men. The chiton came into fashion for women during the 1st half of the 6th cent. BC, and later replaced the  peplos (vase paintings, sculptures). The chiton consists of two rectangular lengths of material ( ptéryges, wings), 150-180 cm wide and of varying length, sewn toget…

Matta

(84 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ψίαθος/ psíathos). Matte oder grobe Decke aus Binsen und Stroh, in Ägypten auch aus Papyrus (vgl. Theophr. h. plant. 4,8,4). Sie diente den Bauern, Reisenden und armen Leuten zum Lagern auf dem Boden; in einer att. Inschr. auch unter dem Hausmobilar aufgeführt [1]. Nach Augustinus (contra Faustum 5,5) ist jemand, der auf der M. schläft, ein Anhänger einer Lehre, die Bedürfnislosigkeit predigt ( mattarius). Die Schlafmatte konnte auch χαμεύνη/ chameúnē genannt werden (Poll. 6,11). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 Hesperia 5, 1936, 382 Nr. 6 A.

Pergament

(334 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Zu einem der Beschreibstoffe der Ant. zählte das gereinigte, enthaarte und gegerbte Leder (Hdt. 5,58,3). P. entstand durch eine verfeinerte Bearbeitung der Tierhaut (von Esel, Kalb, Schaf, Ziege), bei der auf die Gerbung verzichtet wurde; statt dessen legte man die Tierhaut einige Tage in eine Kalklösung, entfernte sodann Fleischreste, Haare und Oberhaut, und legte sie danach in ein Kalkbad zur Reinigung (Kalzinierung). Anschließend spannte man die Haut in einen Rahmen, trocknete…

Epiblema

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἐπίβλημα). Griech. Begriff für Decke, Tuch, Mantel (Poll. 7,49f.). In der modernen arch. Terminologie bezeichnet E. das Schultertuch der dädalischen, bes. der kretischen Frauenstatuetten. In der Regel wird das E. auf der Brust, aber auch über dem Hals und dem Schlüsselbein befestigt; der obere Rand ist mitunter verziert. Auf Denkmälern des 7. Jh.v.Chr. findet sich das E. häufig dargestellt. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Fer(i)culum

(131 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] seltener feretrum (z.B. Ov. met. 3,508; 14,747). Damit werden Tragevorrichtungen unterschiedlicher Form bezeichnet, die zum Befördern von Sachgütern nötig waren, speziell aber solche Gerüste, auf denen bei Aufzügen (Triumph, Bestattung o.ä.) Gegenstände präsentiert wurden, z.B. Beutestücke, Gefangene, Götterbilder u.a. (Suet. Caes. 76); ferner diente das f. zum Transport des Verstorbenen oder der Dinge, die mit ihm bestattet oder verbrannt werden sollten (Stat. Theb. 6,126). F. nannte man auch (Hausrat) das Speisebrett, die flache Schüssel, m…

Petasos

(180 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πέτασος). Griech. Hut aus Filz mit breiter Krempe, aufgrund seiner Herkunft auch als “thessalischer Hut” bezeichnet (Soph. Oid. K. 313); er wurde von Frauen und Männern getragen, die sich viel im Freien aufhielten (Fischer, Hirten, Jäger) oder auf Reisen waren; zu den bekanntesten myth. P.-Trägern zählen Hermes, Peleus, Perseus, Oidipus, Theseus. Weitere Träger sind - seltener - Wagenlenker (Athen. 5,200f.), Reiter (z.B. am Parthenonfries) und die att. Epheben ( ephēbeía ). Für einen sicheren Halt des p. sorgte ein Riemen, der unter das Kinn geführt wur…

Canosiner Vasen

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Gattung der apulischen Vasen, zwischen ca. 350 und 300 v.Chr. wohl ausschließlich für den Grabgebrauch hergestellt. Als ihr besonderes Kennzeichen kann die in wasserlöslichen, verschiedenen Farben (blau, rot/rosa, gelb, hellviolett, braun) ausgeführte Bemalung auf weißem Grund gelten. Bevorzugte Gefäßformen sind Volutenkrater, Kantharos, Oinochoe und Askos, deren Gefäßkörper häufig mit auf kleinen Podesten stehenden Frauenfiguren und plastischem Dekor (geflügelte Köpfe, Gorgoneia…

Bustum

(90 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Der bereits im Zwölftafelgesetz (Cic. leg. 2, 64) als “Grab” definierte Terminus war nach Paul. Fest. 6, 78; 25,3; 27,11 und Serv. Aen. 11,201 der Ort, an dem die Leiche verbrannt und die Reste bestattet wurden, während die Brandstätte allgemein ustrinum heißt. Arch. ist diese Bestattungsform vielfach belegt. Bestattung Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography T. Bechert, Röm. Germanien zwischen Rhein und Maas, 1982, 244-246  M. Struck(Hrsg.), Römerzeitliche Gräber als Quellen zu Rel., Bevölkerungsstruktur und Sozialgesch., 1993 (Arch. Schrift…

Ring

(768 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (δακτύλιος/ daktýlios, ἀκαρές/ akarés; lat. anulus). Unter R. werden im folgenden ausschließlich Finger-R. verstanden (zu Ohr-R. s. Ohrschmuck). Bereits die R. der Aigina- und Thyreatis-Schatzfunde aus dem beginnenden 2. Jt. v. Chr. zeigen hervorragende Beherrschung der Technik und hohe künstlerische Qualität. Aus der frühmyk. Zeit sind Golddraht- und Silber-R. zu nennen, daneben auch die sog. Schild-R., die sich zu einer Leitform des myk. Schmucks entwickeln und ihren Namen nach der …

Astragal

(241 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(Ἀστράγαλος). [English version] [1] s. Ornament s. Ornament Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [English version] [2] Spielstein Spielstein ( talus). Fußwurzelknochen von Kälbern und Schafen/Ziegen, ebenso aus Gold, Glas, Marmor, Ton, Metallen und Elfenbein verfertigt, bereits bei Hom. Il. 23,85-88 als Spielgerät erwähnt. Man verwandte den A. als Zählmarke für Glücks-, Würfel- und Wurfspiele, wozu das Spiel “Grad oder ungrad” (Plat. Lys. 206e) oder πεντάλιθα ( pentálitha, Geschicklichkeitsspiele) gehörten. Beim A.-Spiel hatten die einzelnen Seiten unterschiedliche Zä…

Löffel

(269 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] L. fanden zunächst als Rühr- oder Koch-L. (griech. τορύνη/ torýnē, Aristoph. Equ. 984, vgl. Anth. Pal. 6,305; 306, lat. trua oder trulla) bei der Zubereitung von Speisen Verwendung. Zum Schöpfen von flüssigen Nahrungsmitteln oder Wein diente der κύαθος/ kýathos. Wenn der L. auch schon früh bekannt war, so fand er trotzdem beim Speisen wenig Verwendung, da man vornehmlich ausgehöhltes Brot (μυστίλη/ mystílē, μύστρον/ mýstron) zum Verzehr von Breien, Brühen oder Suppen u.ä. benutzte (Aristoph. Equ. 1168-1174). Der Römer unterschied Löffel mit ovaler Schale ( ligul…

Recta

(107 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The first time the Roman boy donned the toga virilis, he wore the ( tunica) recta as an undergarment; for the sons of equestrians and senators, it was furnished with the insignia of rank ( latus clavus). The long, white tunica with tight upper sleeves which the Roman bride donned on the eve of her wedding, which she slept in and wore on her wedding day was called recta or regilla (Plin. HN 8,194). Clothing; Toga Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography Blümner, PrAlt., 336, 350 f.  C. M. Wilson, The Clothing of the Ancient Romans, 1938, 138-145  D. Balsdon, Die Frau in der röm…

Facial expression

(469 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] FE means the expressive motions of the entire face (moods) or parts of it that spontaneously indicate a momentary human mood or are deliberately assumed with the intention of making a particular expression. FE's are often situation-related and supplemented by  gestures ( Gestus) or even only become comprehensible through the latter. On the stage individual characters were shown with differing FE's ( Masks,  Mimos). FE's were also a means of providing a person (e.g. a philosopher, …

Palimpsest

(350 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (παλίμψηστος/ palímpsēstos [βίβλος/ bíblos or χάρτης/ chártēs], lat. codex rescriptus). A 're-scraped' book, papyrus or parchment leaf, prepared for renewed writing after its first text was scraped off. The first text was either wiped off with a sponge or scraped away with pumice stone. This method was already used in Egypt (e.g. PBerlin 3024, 12th dynasty, from c. 2000 BC), and was also standard practice in later periods, out of thrift (Cic. Fam. 7,18,2) or lack of virgin papyrus or parchment (cf. Catull. 22,5). Plutarch (Mor. 779c, 50…

Ofellius

(378 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
Roman family name (also Offellius, Offillius etc.), probably from the Oscan praenomen Of(f)ellus, which also appears as a cognomen (a landowner in Venusia: Hor. Sat. 2,2,2f.; 53f.; 112ff.). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [1] O. Tribunus militum, 36 BC Tribunus militum in 36 BC, mocked rewards handed out by Octavian (Augustus) as paltry, whereupon according to Appian he vanished without trace (App. B Civ. 5,532f.). Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) [German version] [2] O., A. Roman jurist Jurist, see Ofilius Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2a] O. Ferus, C. Campanian …

Antyx

(109 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀντυξ; ántyx) Raised metal rim of the Greek shield (Hom. Il. 6,118; 15,645; 18,479 and passim); also refers to a hoop-like railing or ledge of the Greek racing and war chariot (archaic vase paintings [1.524 fig. 44]), which could be used to hold on to when stepping in or out (Hom. Il. 5,728 f.; 16,406). Evidently made of wood (Hom. Il. 21,38). When the chariot was not in motion, one could wrap the reins around the antyx (Hom. Il. 5,262). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 C. Weiss, M. Boss, Original und Restaurierung, in: AA 1992, 522-528. J. Wiesner, Fahren und Reit…

Mattress

(116 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τύλη/ týlē; Latin culcita, torus). Mattresses were laid on the Greek and Roman kline (lying on the supporting straps of the kline, Petron. Sat. 97,4) or were spread out directly on the floor (Ath. 15,675a; Alci. 4,13,14; χαμεύνη/ chameúnē: Theoc. 7,133; 13, 33). Mattresses were filled with wool, straw, reeds, sea grass, hay, hair, feathers; the feathers of Germanic geese being especially valued (Plin. HN 10,54, compare Ov. Met. 8,655 on rushes). There also was the κνέφαλλον/ knéphallon (Poll. 10,42) and the τυλεῖον/ tyleíon, the fine underbed made of wool cut a…

Crepundia

(88 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A piece of jewellery or a toy, usually metal, for small children in Rome. Besides the bulla ( Ages), children wore several such miniatures as an  amulet, strung on a chain and worn around the neck or over the shoulder. The crepundia were also used to identify abandoned children and were kept in a cistella (little chest) together with other children's items (Plaut. Cist. 634ff., Plaut. Rud. 1151ff.).  Amulet;  Jewellery Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography E. Schmidt, Spielzeug und Spiele im klass. Altertum, 1971, 18-21 incl. fig. 1.

Greeting

(1,186 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
I. Gestures of greeting [German version] A. Handshake According to Greek and Roman custom, one would shake the right hand of guests, family members, close acquaintances or friends and squeeze it firmly (Hom. Il. 10,542 et passim; Xen. Cyr. 3,2,14; Aristoph. Nub. 81; Plut. Cicero 879; Plut. Antonius 952; Plut. De amicorum multitudine 94b), both as a greeting (according to Plut. Caesar 708 more a form of affability) and to say good-bye. Shaking hands was seen as a sign of friendship and trust (Xen. Cyr. 3…

Canistrum

(110 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek κανοῦν; kanoûn). Flat wicker basket; it served as a fruit basket (Ov. Met. 8,675) and was used in agriculture (Verg. G. 4,280). Canistra of sturdy materials (clay, silver, gold) were used as receptacles for liquid substances, e.g. honey and oil. The canistrum was also a device for sacrifices (Tib. 1,10,27; Ov. Met. 2,713 and more); often represented in Roman art in this role, the canistrum contained incense, fruits and offering-cakes. The silver saucers for drinking vessels were called canistra siccaria (Serv. Aen. 1,706).  Kanoun Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bi…

Calceus

(275 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman shoe or half-boot made of leather that was probably adopted from the Etruscans and was part of the clothing ( vestis forensis) of the noble Roman citizen. If a member of the nobility dressed in other shoes in public, he would be criticized (Suet.Tib. 13; an exception was the dress for the banquet at which people wore the solla; Hor. Sat. 2,8,77; Mart. 3,50,3; Suet. Vit. 2). In Roman literature and art the calceus was represented in many ways; three variants can be distinguished that at the same time served to differentiate between social ranks. Th…

Geneleus

(237 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Sculptor of the archaic period, famous for the family group with his signature in the Heraion on  Samos (560-550 BC). The group consists of the reclining figure of the founder ...ιλάρχος, three standing girls (unknown name, Philippe, Ornithe), the fragments of a young man, and the enthroned mother Phileia; apart from Ornithe (Berlin, SM, Inv. 1739), all the figures are on Samos (Vathy, Mus. Inv. 768). G. proves himself a master of Ionian sculpture because of the minute detail to w…

Canosa Vases

(129 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Type of  Apulian vases, between c. 350 and 300 BC, probably made exclusively for use in graves. Their distinguishing feature is their decoration in a variety of water-soluble pigments (blue, red/pink, yellow, pale purple, brown) on a white background. Preferred  vessel forms are the volute-krater, cantharus, oinochoe, and askos, whose main bodies were frequently decorated with figures of women on small pedestals and with three-dimensional decor (winged heads, gorgoneia et al.). The gre…

Paestan ware

(394 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] PW first developed in around 360 BC when immigrant artists from Sicily founded a new workshop in the southern Italian city of Paestum (Poseidonia), the leading masters of which were the vase painters Asteas and Python. Both are the only vase painters in southern Italy whose signatures are known on vases. The Paestan vase painters favoured bell craters, neck amphorae, hydrias, lebetes gamikoi (nuptial cauldrons depicting mostly wedding but also funeral scenes), lekanides (cosmetic/trinket containers), lekythoi (one-handled flasks for perfumed oil) and jug…

Sakkos

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σάκκος/ sákkos). Closed bonnet, esp. popular as a headdress of Greek women in the 5th and 4th cents. BC. The evidence from Attic vase paintings and tomb reliefs shows the sákkos worn mainly by female servants, whereas in southern Italian art it appears as the headdress of any woman. Sákkoi frequently had a loop on the calotte for hanging them up and often tassels hanging down. Some sákkoi were unadorned or decorated with simple lines, while others were richly decorated with ornaments of meanders, waves, scrolls and similar. The sákkos was not necessarily the only hea…

Tiara

(266 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τιάρα/ tiára). Head covering of Near Eastern peoples (Armenians, Assyrians, Sagae, especially Persians; Hdt. 3,12; 7,61; 7,64 et passim), similar to a turban; also a tall tiara, decorated with stars and rising to a point, which among the Persians was fit only for the king, his relatives and holders of high office (Xen. An. 2,5,23; Xen. Cyr. 8,3,13). In Greek sources, the tiara is also called a kyrbasía or a kíd(t)aris (e.g. Aristoph. Av. 487). The tiara as a head covering for Middle Eastern aristocrats was also common in the Roman period (Suet. Ner…

Tribon

(99 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τρίβων/ tríbōn, τριβώνιον/ tribṓnion). A coat ( himátion, cf. pallium ) of 'bristly' wollen material, worn by Cretans (Str. 10,4,20) and Spartans (Plut. Lycurgus 30; Plut. Agesilaus 30; Ael. VH 7,13); later also common in Athens (Thuc. 1,6,3). It was part of the clothing of simple people (Aristoph. Eccl. 850; Aristoph. Vesp. 1131), farmers (Aristoph. Ach. 184; 343) and lakōnizóntes ('imitators of Spartan customs', Dem. Or. 54,34). From the time of Socrates (Pl. Symp. 219b; Pl. Prt. 335d; Xen. Mem. 1,6,2) the tribon was also the typ…

Torques

(475 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Pingel, Volker (Bochum)
('torque'; Lat. also torquis; Gr. στρεπτόν/ streptón, 'twisted'). [German version] I. Classical Antiquity Helically twisted collar of bronze, gold or silver with open but almost touching ends, which were thickened or figure-shaped and could sometimes be turned outwards. Torques are known from the Bronze Age onwards and numerous examples survive. The Greeks learned of torques from the Medes and Persians, where they were worn by people of high status (Hdt. 8,113,1; 9,80,4; Xen. Cyr. 1,3,2-3; cf. Curt. 3,3,13),…

Tabula

(196 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] General Latin term for board (Plin. HN 31,128; 33,76; 36,114; Ov. Met. 11,428), then for 'game board' ( tabula lusoria, Games, Board games, Dice (game)), 'painted panel' ( tabula picta, Plin. HN 35,20-28), 'votive tablet' ( tabula votiva, Hor. Carm. 1,5,13; Pers. 6,33). In a special sense, tabula is the term for writing tablets, used for writing and calculating, of wood, whitewashed or with a layer of wax, or metal tablets (Writing materials, Codex ), as were already common among the Greeks. Tabulae were used in the public domain, e.g. as tablets of law ( Tabulae duodecim

Diphros

(118 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Four-legged stool, generally with turned legs. A seat for gods and heroes (west frieze of the Siphnian treasury in Delphi; east frieze of the  Parthenon), as well as for common people in scenes from everyday life (geometric amphora Athens, NM Inv. no. 804: workshop scenes). They were made of simple wood or valuable ebony, the inventory lists of the Parthenon even record silver-footed diphroi. A special form is the folding stool (διφρος ὀκλαδίας; díphros okladías), whose legs end in claw-shaped feet.  Furniture;  Sella curulis Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography G…

Darius Painter

(180 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Apulian vase painter working c. 340/320 BC, named after the main figure on the  Darius Crater. On the vessels he painted (including voluted craters, lutrophoroi, amphorae), some of which are monumental, he generally depicted scenes from classical tragedies (Euripides) and themes from Greek myth; some of these are only documented through his work. Other vases show scenes depicting weddings, women and Eros, as well as Dionysian motifs and rare sepulchral representations ( Naiskos vases). His tendency to name people and representations in inscriptions ( Persai, Pat…

Peniculus

(69 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also penicillum). Duster, a stick with the hairy end of an animal's tail (Paul Fest. 208; 231 M.); used to wipe down tables (Plaut. Men. 77f.), polish shoes (Plaut. ibid. 391) or clean agricultural implements and vessels (Columella 12,18,5). The peniculus was also used as a brush to whitewash walls (Plin. HN 28,235) and as a paintbrush (Plin. HN 35,60f.; 103; 149). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Subligaculum

(95 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Men's item of clothing to cover the abdomen (Varro, Ling. 6,21; Non. 29,17). Originally, it was probably worn under the Roman toga (Non. 29,17; Isid. Orig. 19,22,5) and was later replaced by the tunica . The subligar, on the other hand, is a cloth worn for special occasions, such as by actors (Juv. 6,70) and by women in the bath (Mart. 3,87,3), or generally by labourers (Plin. HN 12,59). Perizoma Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography M. Pausch, Neues zur Bekleidung im Mosaik der 'Bikini-Mädchen' von Piazza Armerina in Sizilien, in: Nikephoros 9, 1996, 171-173.

Petasos

(207 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πέτασος; pétasos). Greek hat made of felt with a wide brim, also referred to as a 'Thessalian hat' because of its origin (Soph. OC 313); it was worn by women and men who spent a lot of time outdoors (fishermen, herdsmen/women, hunters) or who were travelling; amongst the most best-known mythological petasos wearers were Hermes, Peleus, Perseus, Oedipus and Theseus. Additional wearers are - more rarely - chariot riders (Athen. 5,200f.), horsemen (e.g. on the Parthenon freeze) and the Attic ephebes ( ephēbeía ). The petasos was firmly retained by a strap that was p…

Helicon

(372 words)

Author(s): Freitag, Klaus (Münster) | Folkerts, Menso (Munich) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(Ἑλικών; Helikṓn). [German version] [1] Mountain range in central Greece Mountain range in central Greece, dividing the Copais Basin and the upper Cephissos Valley from the Gulf of Corinth (cf. Str. 9,2,25; Paus. 9,28,1-31,7). The western part of the H. belonged to Phocis and the eastern part to Boeotia. The highest elevation is the peak of the Palaiovouno (1,748 m). Few passes lead over the H., which is rich in springs and forests and was famed for its herbs. The H. has large areas that were used in anti…

Mastruca

(66 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also mastruga). Sardian word (Quint. Inst. 1,5) for a close-fitting garment made of (sheep)skin, sleeveless and reaching down to the upper thighs. The Romans considered those who wore it to be uncivilised (Cic. Scaur. 45d; Cic. Prov. cons. 15), thus Alaricus in: Prud. in Symm. 1,659f. In Plaut. Poen. 1310-1313 it is also used as a term of abuse. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Kiss

(4,070 words)

Author(s): Binder, Gerhard (Bochum) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Typology To create a typology of the kiss in antiquity seems rather difficult, given its many specifications, of which the erotic kiss represents no more than a single facet. Existing approaches barely go beyond collections of material [1; 2; 3]. As far as tradition permits, two main categories can be distinguished: formal kisses (in politics; client relations; cult, religion) and private kisses (in family, kinship, friendship; love relations). Within these main categories and th…

Brattea

(258 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πέταλον; pétalon). Ancient term uncommon in archaeological terminology; in Greek originally the ‘leaf or foliage of a tree’ (Hom. Il. 2,312; Od. 19,520), in Bacchyl. 5,186 the Olympian wreath of the wild olive, in the 2nd cent. BC at the latest considered to be the artificial metal leaves of a golden  wreath. In Roman sources brattea is used to describe a thin metal foil, mostly silver or gold for gilding objects, also veneers of precious wood (Plin. HN 16,232) or tortoiseshell (Mart. 9,59,9), but mostly gold leaf or gold foil is mea…

Household equipment

(1,622 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek τὰ ἔπιπλα/ tà épipla, ἡ σκευή/ hē skeuḗ; Latin supellex, instrumentum). Household equipment (HE) comprises the objects that are needed in daily life and that constitute the majority of moveable belongings; this includes primarily  furniture, cooking utensils and kitchen crockery, lighting devices,  carpets,  blankets, and in a wider sense also  jewellery and  clothing, furthermore, according to current understanding, objects belonging to the sphere of immovables, e.g. the doors and ro…

Repositorium

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Originally a Roman tray, then a stand or centrepiece used to arrange and serve food for a course (Petron. Sat. 33; 40; 49), introduced probably at the beginning of the 1st cent. BC as luxury tableware. The repositorium could have simple, round or rectangular form, but it could also have several levels and be of considerable height; it was also decorated with figures (Petron. Sat. 36), veneered with valuable woods and fitted with silver on the corners and edges (Plin. HN 33,146). Carrying away the repositorium while a guest was still drinking was considered a bad o…

Hirschfeld Painter

(229 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Attic vase painter of the geometric period (late geometric I b, after 750 BC;  Geometric vase painting), named after Gustav Hirschfeld (1847-1897), who first described the main work excavated in 1870, the so-called Hirschfeld Krater (Athens, NM Inv. no. 990) [1; 2]. The Hirschfeld Painter (HP) and his workshop worked in the tradition of the  Dipylon Painter and had a preference for monumental kraters of which the eponymous krater and a further one in New York (MMA Inv. no. 14.130.…

Diadema

(359 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (διάδημα; diádēma). The term was originally used to describe all bands worn round the head; different from  wreath. The diadema decorates, consecrates and raises its wearer above others; in this way diademata are symbols of dignity, particularly in cult; to this belong the ‘bust crowns’ or the ‘griffin diadema’ of the priests and deities; of a religious nature are also the ribbon-, gable- and rhomboid-shaped ‘ diademata of the dead’ that from the Mycenaean period onwards (shaft tomb IV, Mycenae) in many cases adorn the forehead of the deceased a…

Litter, Sedan chair

(529 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (φορεῖον/ phoreîon; Latin lectica, sella sc. gestatoria, portatoria). The litter as a means of conveyance has been known in the Orient since earliest times; in Greece it is first mentioned in the 4th cent. BC (Din. 1,36); in Hellenism it is a luxury item (Ath. 5,195c; 212c; Diod. Sic. 31,8,12). We cannot determine when the litter was introduced to the Roman empire but it was in general use from the 2nd cent. BC (cf. Liv. 43,7,5; Gell. NA 10,3,51); its excessive utilization in Rome already compelled Caesar to limit its use in the …

Peplos

(543 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Baumbach, Manuel (Zürich)
(πέπλος; péplos). [German version] [1] Blanket, cloth, or shroud Blanket, cloth, or shroud (Hom. Il. 24,796; Eur. Tro. 627, cf. Eur. Hec. 432); later, women's outer garment or coat (Hom. Il. 5,734; Hom. Od. 18,292, cf. Xen. Cyr. 5,1,6). In the myth, the Trojan women place a peplos on the knees of the cult image of seated Athena (Hom. Il. 6,303). Peplos is also the term used for esp. magnificent robes, above all for the dress of Hera of Olympia which was newly woven every four years by 16 women (Paus. 5,16) and for that of Athena Polias in Athens, which wa…

Festival dress

(444 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] It is safe to assume that the dress worn at private and public festivals differed in colour or adornment from everyday wear; women in  Sybaris, for example, who were to partake in one of the municipal festivities, received a year's notice in order to prepare their attire accordingly (Ath. 12,521c; Plut. Mor. 147e). A public appearance called for a clean attire (cf. Pl. Symp. 174a). On some festive occasions, a cloak was worn, referred to as ξυστίς ( xystís) (Aristoph. Lys. 1190, Nub. 70; Theoc. 2,74; Plut. Alcibiades 32,2). The ‘Phoenician’ red chitons, wor…

Tainia

(303 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(Greek ταινία/ tainía). Term for bindings of all kinds. [German version] [1] Headband for festivals (Head)band, worn at Greek festivals (Pl. Symp. 212d.e, 213d; Xen. Symp. 5,9). Even gods wore, or bound their heads with, tainiai. (Paus. 1,8,4). Furthermore, cult images (Paus. 8,31,8; 10,35,10), trees (Theocr. 18,44), monuments [3], urns, sacrificial animals and deceased (Lucian, Dial. mort. 13,4) had tainiai wound round them. The Romans adopted tainiai from the Greeks (e.g. Ov. Met. 8,724 f.). As a sign of a victor and of success (Paus. 4,16,6; 6,20,10; 9,22,3…

Cushion

(255 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἡ τύλη, τὸ κνέφαλλον, Lat. cervical, pulvinus). Cushions were used to assure comfort when sitting or lying on chairs, klines (Petron. Sat. 32), in litters (Juv. 6,353) or when lying directly on the ground. Floor cushions were also offered for comfort at the circus (Mart. 14,160). The materials used for cushions included linen, wool or leather, which were often beautifully decorated. Straw, hay, reeds, eelgrass or bulrushes (Ov. Met. 8,655) as well as flocks of wool were used as filling…

Follis

(686 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Klose, Dietrich (Munich)
[German version] [1] Bellows (φῦσα / phŷsa, bellows). The blacksmith's tool already mentioned in Homer (Il. 18, 372; 412; 468-70) is associated in Greek art in particular with  Hephaestus (Siphnian Treasury, Delphi), but rarely appears in depictions of workshops. There were two (Hdt. I 68) or more (Hom. Il. 18,468-470) folles in a workshop. In Roman art the follis is also depicted relatively rarely; on a blacksmith's gravestone in Aquileia (Mus. inv. no. 166) the worker at the follis holds a protective shield in front of himself; a fresco in the house of the Vettii in Po…

Tropa

(136 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τρόπα; trópa). Greek children's games with astragaloi (Astragalos [2]), nuts, etc. (Poll. 9,103; schol.  Pl. Ly. 206e); in consisted in throwing one's own astragalos (or nut, etc.) in such a way that it moved one's opponent's astragalos from its position. In a variant of the game one had to try to drop an astragalos into a small pit in the ground. Tropa was probably also played by young Romans (Mart. 4,14,9). Connected with the game of tropa is Polyclitus' [1] group, known only from literature, known as the 'Boys Playing at Knucklebones' (Plin. HN 34,55)…

Campanian vases

(696 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The Campanian vases (CV) of the 5th-4th cents. BC were made of a light brown clay and the surface often painted with a red-coloured coating. Artists generally preferred smaller vessels, besides these as the main shape, strap-handled amphora, also hydriae and bell craters; only seldom do pelike types appear ( Pottery, shapes and types of, vessel shapes with fig.). Characteristics attributed to  Apulian vase painting such as volute and column craters, loutrophoroi, rhyta or nestorid…

Python

(1,161 words)

Author(s): Junk, Tim (Kiel) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Engels, Johannes (Cologne) | Schmitt, Tassilo (Bielefeld) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Et al.
(Πύθων/ Pýthōn). [German version] [1] Dragon killed by Apollo near Delphi An enormous dragon killed by Apollo near Delphi with his arrows. The oldest version of the story is offered by H. Hom. 3,300-374: Apollo overcomes a female dragon who perpetrates her mischief in the vicinity of Delphi and into whose care Hera had given her son Typhon (Typhoeus, Typhon). The town and the god receive the nickname Pythṓ (cf. also the name of the female seer at Delphi, Pythía [1]) from its decaying (πύθεσθαι/ pýthesthai) corpse. According to Eur. IT 1245-1252, the dragon is male and guards the…

Seat

(409 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Essential item of furniture for sitting on in the sparsely furnished ancient household, mainly made of wood (maple, beech, oak), but sometimes also of bronze and partially or entirely of gold (Hdt. 1,14; Ath. 12,514) or marble. Occasionally individual parts of the chair also consisted of other materials such as ivory or onyx (Plin. HN 36,59), metal or precious metal. There were also woven seats made of willow branches (Plin. HN 16,174). Depictions and stone copies show what they looked like. In Antiquity the principal forms (cf.. Ath. 5,192e-f) were the díphros

Triga

(337 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Latin from triiuga; Greek τρίπωλος/ trípōlos; 'team of three'). Its significance as a racing, hunting or war vehicle was far less than that of bigae and of the quadriga. In Homer only extra horses for a team of two are mentioned (cf. Hom. Il. 8,80-86; 16,152-154 and 467-476) and on one occasion a gift of three horses (Hom. Od. 4,590); otherwise the literary sources on trigae are rather rare (e.g. Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 7,73). The same is true for representations in art; first and foremost are 9th-cent. BC Assyrian reliefs with battle and  huntin…

South Italian vases

(1,233 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Beginnings The first workshops in southern Italy for red-figured pottery appeared around the mid 5th cent. BC, founded by Athenian vase-painters. Native artists were trained there. Thus, the initial dependence on Attic models, which expressed itself e.g. in the choice of motif or Atticizing forms (Lucanian vases), was replaced by a characteristic painting style and repertoire of decorations and motifs. Towards the end of the 5th cent. BC, the so-called 'ornate and plain styles' emerged in Apulian vase-painting (Apulian vases). Through th…

Mourning

(981 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Literary sources In Greece and Rome, deaths and accidents, financial and business losses and military defeats were occasions for mourning (πένθος/ pénthos; Lat. luctus). Aside from the characteristic mourning dress, women displayed their mourning by renouncing gold jewellery (Dion. Hal. Ant. 5,48,4; Liv. 34,7,10), by beating, and sometimes baring, their chests (Prop. 2,13,27; Petron. 111,2), by loosening and tearing their hair (Catull. 64,348-351; Tib. 1,1,67 f.; Liv. 1,26,2), by crying and wailing (P…

Perizoma

(188 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (περίζωμα, lat. perizoma). Griech. Schurz zur Bedeckung des Unterkörpers, der entweder um den Unterleib gelegt und von einem Gürtel gehalten, als Tuch um die Hüfte und dann zw. den Beinen durchgeführt oder in Form einer Shorts-ähnlichen Hose angezogen wurde. Das p. trugen Arbeiter, Handwerker, Opferdiener, Priester, Sklaven, aber auch Soldaten (vgl. Pol. 6,25,3; 12,26a 4) und Sportler als einziges Bekleidungsstück (Nacktheit C.) oder als Untergewand. Auf Darstellungen sind zumeist Männer mit dem P. bekleidet, seltener …

Mantele

(147 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] ( mantellum, mantelium, χειρόμακτρον/ cheirómaktron). Ein rechteckiges Tuch aus Leinen mit Borten und Fransen; es diente bei Kulthandlungen als Handtuch, das die Opferdiener bei sich trugen, bei Mahlzeiten zum Reinigen der Hände (z.B. Xen. Kyr. 1,3,5) und als Tischtuch (Mart. 12,28). Bei Sappho (99 Diehl) wird das cheirómaktron als Kopfschmuck erwähnt. In seinen hauptsächlichen Funktionen als Tisch- und Handtuch entspricht das m. der mappa, die zudem ein beliebtes Geschenk an den Saturnalien war (Mart. 5,18,1). Seit Nero (Suet. Nero 22) ist …

Badehose

(86 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ᾤα λουτρίς, subligar). Beim gemeinsamen Bad in den Badeanstalten trugen Männer und Frauen einen Schamgürtel bzw. ein Badetuch (Poll. 7,66; 10,181, perizoma , subligaculum ) aus Schafsfell oder Stoff, Frauen auch eine Brustbinde (Vasenbilder, “Bikinimädchen” aus Piazza Armerina). Für Männer konnte die B. ( aluta, Mart. 7,35,1) aus Leder sein. Im Pap. Cair. Zen. 60,8 wird eine ἐκλουστρίς erwähnt. Ungewiß ist das Tragen einer Haube ( vesica). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography R. Ginouvès, Balaneutikè, 1962, 223-225  W. Heinz, Röm. Thermen. Badewesen u…

Arca

(201 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (λάρναξ). Kasten, Kiste, Truhe, dann speziell die Geldtruhe aus Holz oder metallbeschlagenem Holz im Atrium (Iuv. 11,26; 14,259 u.ö.), von denen Exemplare bzw. deren Reste aus Pompeji bekannt sind. A. hießen eine große Anzahl sakraler, staatlicher und privater Geldkassen, z. B. die der virgines vestales. Die A. konnten so groß sein, daß sich eine Person darin verbergen konnte (App. civ. 4,44). Aus der Spätant. haben sich kleine A. erh., die als Geschenke mit Glückwunschformeln an die Frau überreicht wurden und auf ihrem Me…

Paragauda

(124 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (παραγαύδης). Eine erst im 3. Jh.n.Chr. belegte Bezeichnung für eine goldene oder purpurne Borte in Form eines griech. Gammas (Γ), die in ein Gewand eingewebt war (SHA Claud. 17,6); dann auch übertragen auf ein dem Ärmelchiton (Chiton) ähnliches Gewand ( paragaúdion) aus feinem Seidenstoff, das der röm. Kaiser je nach Verdienst mit einer bis fünf Borten als Auszeichnung vergab (SHA Aurelian. 15,4,46; SHA Probus 4,5). Von daher war das Tragen des Gewandes Privatpersonen verboten (Cod. Theod. 10,21,1 und 2). Aufgrund de…

Quadriga

(496 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (τετραορία/ tetraoría, τέθριππον/ téthrippon; lat. meist im Pl. quadrigae). Viergespann, der mit vier nebeneinander laufenden Pferden bespannte zweirädrige Wagen, der stehend gelenkt wurde, nach ant. Trad. von Trochilos oder Erichthonios [1] (Verg. georg. 3,113, vgl. Plin. nat. 7,202) erfunden. In den homerischen Epen werden Viergespanne recht selten erwähnt (z. B. Hom. Il. 8,185; 11,699), tauchen dann aber in der lit. Überl. z. B. bei myth. Wettfahrten (Oinomaos und Pelops, vgl. Philost…

Kranz

(621 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (στέφανος/ stéphanos, στεφάνη/ stephánē, lat. corolla, corona). Aus Blumen, Blättern und Zweigen geformt oder in deren Nachbildung (Bronze, Silber, Gold; s. z.B. [1]) gefertigt, ist der K. Bestandteil griech. und röm. Alltags- und Kulturlebens, ein Symbol der Weihung, Auszeichnung und des Schmuckes für Menschen und Götter; der K.-träger hob sich aus den anderen hervor (vgl. Apul. met. 11,24.4), und ihn anzugreifen war verwerflich (vgl. Aristoph. Plut. 21). K. werden seit mythischer Urzeit getragen (Tert. De corona 13). K. sind im Kult unerläßlich (FGrH 33…

Monopodium

(124 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (griech. trápeza monópus, Poll. 10,69). Runde oder viereckige Tische mit nur einer zentralen Stütze, deren Fuß aus floralen oder myth. Figuren gebildet sein konnte. Im Griech. sind solche Tische seit der Archaik bekannt, werden aber erst im Hell. häufiger; in Rom waren monopodia seit ihrem Bekanntwerden (erstmals im Triumph von 187 v.Chr. mitgeführt, Liv. 39,6,7; Plin. nat. 34,14) sehr beliebt und haben sich v.a. aus den Vesuvstädten erhalten. Varro (ling. 5,125) erwähnt das cartibulum, das im compluvium stand, um Geschirr aufzunehmen. Delp…

Cesnola-Maler

(175 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Benannt nach seinem ehem. in der Cesnola-Sammlung befindlichen Krater spätgeom. Zeit (H. 114,9 cm mit Deckel, aus Kourion/Zypern, jetzt New York, MMA, Inv. 74. 51. 965; geometrische Vasenmalerei). Der anonyme Vasenmaler verbindet in seinen Werken vorderasiatische mit mutterländischen und inselgriech. Motiven. Die ungewöhnliche Form des eponymen Kraters wie auch die Kombination der auf ihm angebrachten Motive führten in der Vergangenheit zu Diskussionen über die Datier. und Herkun…

Lukanische Vasen

(286 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Die Produktion der rf. L.V. setzt in den J. um 430 v.Chr. mit dem Pisticci-Maler ein, benannt nach einem Fundort seiner Vasen. Er steht noch ganz in att. Trad., die sich in der stilistischen Behandlung seiner Personen, der Ornamente und Gefäßformen äußert; er bevorzugt Glockenkratere, die er mit Verfolgungs- und Alltagsszenen oder dionysischen Bildern ziert. Seine Nachfolger, der Amykos- und der Kyklops-Maler, haben sich offenbar in Metapontium niedergelassen und hier eine Werkst…

Sabanum

(83 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Ein grobes leinenes röm. Tuch, das zum Abtrocknen und Abreiben des Körpers nach dem Bade (Apul. met. 1,23, vgl. Mart. 12,70) bzw. als Umhang diente, um nach einem Dampfbad ins Schwitzen zu kommen; des weiteren nutzte man das s. zum Auspressen der Honigwaben und Umhüllen der Speisen beim Kochen (Apicius 6,215; 239). In der Spätant. verstand man unter s. ein leinenes, mit Gold und Edelsteinen geschmücktes Gewand (Ven. Fort. vita S. Radegundis 9) bzw. einen Mantel. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Salutatio

(418 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (“Begrüßung”). Der morgendliche Empfang der Klienten ( cliens, clientes ) durch den patronus diente als Aufwartung, zur Entgegennahme von Ratschlägen (Hor. epist. 2,1,102) und von Unterstützung z. B. durch Geld ( sportula ). Er fand in den ersten beiden Morgenstunden statt (Mart. 4,8); hierbei hatte der Klient ( salutator) in der toga zu erscheinen (Iuv. 3,126 f.), weswegen Martial (3,46,1) den Klienteldienst auch togata opera nennt. Die Besucher versammelten sich im vestibulum oder atrium des Hauses ihres patronus und warteten auf Einlaß (Hor. epist. 1,5…

Epostrakismos

(56 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἐποστρακισμός). Knabenspiel, bei dem man eine Scherbe oder einen flachen Stein so auf das Wasser warf, daß er aufschlug und weiterhüpfte. Sieger war derjenige, dessen Stein oder Scherbe am weitesten flog und am häufigsten sprang (Poll. 9, 119; Hes. s.v. E.; Min. Fel. 3; Eust. in Hom. Il. 18,543). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Brattea

(232 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πέταλον). In der arch. Terminologie ungebräuchlicher ant. Begriff; im Griech. urspr. nur als “Blatt, Laub eines Baumes” (Hom. Il. 2,312; Od. 19,520), bei Bakchyl. 5,186 “Kranz des Ölbaums von Olympia”, spätestens im 2.Jh. v.Chr. als artifizielles Erzeugnis für die Blätter des Goldkranzes (Kranz) verstanden. In röm. Quellen bezeichnet b. eine auf einen Gegenstand aufgelegte dünne Folie aus Metall, meist Silber oder Gold, auch Furniere aus kostbarem Holz (Plin. nat. 16,232) oder Schildpatt (Mart. 9,59,9), doch ist meist Blattgo…

Perücke

(263 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (φενάκη/ phenákē, πηνήκη/ pēnḗkē, lat. capillamentum, galerus). Die Verwendung der P. hat in Griechenland offenbar im ausgehenden 6. Jh.v.Chr. eingesetzt; die spätarcha. Koren zeigen Frisuren, die ohne angesetzte Haarteile nicht denkbar sind. Auch im Theater bediente man sich der P. im 5. Jh.v.Chr. (Aristoph. Thesm. 258) und nutzte auch falsche Bärte (Aristoph. Eccl.25), ebenso tragen Musiker und Gaukler P. und Haarteile (Ail. var. 1,26; Lukian. Alexandros 3). Der Gebrauch von P. und H…

Manicae

(278 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(χειρίς/ cheirís). [English version] A. Ärmel Bereits die minoisch-myk. Kleidung wies sowohl bis an die Handwurzel als auch kürzere bis zur Ellenbeuge oder nur bis zum Oberarm reichende Ärmel auf; in der archa. und klass. Zeit war der Chiton mit Ärmeln bei “Barbaren” (Perser, Skythen u.a.) üblich, wurde aber auch von Griechen getragen. An der röm. Tracht waren M. anfänglich ein Zeichen der Verweichlichung (Tunica) - so wird noch Commodus gerügt, weil er eine Tunica mit Ärmeln trug (Cass. Dio 72,17, vg…

Plaga

(224 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] [1] Römisches Jagdnetz Röm. Jagdnetz, speziell Fangnetz, in das Wild (Hirsche, Eber) durch Hunde bei der Treibjagd hineingehetzt wurde (Hor. epod. 2,31-32; Hor. epist. 1,6,58; 1,18,45) im Gegensatz zu den retia (Schlagnetzen) und casses (Fall- und Sacknetzen); von den aus Stricken geflochtenen plagae waren die aus Cumae am meisten geschätzt (Plin. nat. 19,11). Die Treibjagd mit der p., schon früh in der ant. Kunst dargestellt (Becher von Vaphio), war dann v.a. ein Motiv der röm. Mosaik- und Sarkophagkunst. Der Terminus p. ist in der mod. arch. Forsch. nicht …

Geschicklichkeitsspiele

(488 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] wurden vor allem von Kindern veranstaltet. Bei einem Teil dieser Spiele dienten Astragale, Nüsse, kleine Steine, Münzen, kleine Kugeln oder Scherben als Spielzeug (Kinderspiel), bei anderen Stöcke, Scheiben, Räder usw. Beliebt war das πεντάλιθα ( pentálitha) genannte G. (Poll. 9,126), bei dem man fünf Steine (Nüsse, Kugeln o.ä.) hochwarf und mit der Handfläche oder dem Handrücken wieder auffing; bei einem anderen G., dem orca-Spiel, warf man in ein sich oben verengendes Gefäß Nüsse, Steine u.a. (Ps.-Ov. Nux 85f.; Pers. 3,50); diesem Spiel äh…

Armarium

(197 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (Schrank). Neben der arca das zweite wichtige Möbel zum Aufbewahren von Sachgütern. A. scheint ein typisch röm. Einrichtungsgegenstand gewesen zu sein, der den Griechen erst spät zur Kenntnis gelangte ( purgiskos). In seiner Grundfunktion bezeichnet A. den Geräteschrank, dann auch den Schrank für Speisen, Geld und Schmuck; auch die Bücherschränke bzw. -regale der Bibliotheken hießen A. Ein Grabrelief in Rom (TM 184) zeigt das A. in einer Schusterwerkstatt [3. 114-115 Taf. 117,1-2] bzw. als Einrichtungsgegenstand im Haushalt zusammen u.a. mit der arca (Leide…

Forum

(7,310 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Uggeri, Giovanni (Florenz)
I. Archäologisch-urbanistisch [English version] A. Definition und Funktion Lat. Begriff für Markt, Marktplatz; darüber hinaus in seltenen Fällen der Vorhof eines Grabes (im Sinne des griech. drómos, z.B. Cic. leg. 2,61) oder ein Teil der Weinkelter (Varro, rust. 1,54; Colum. 11,2,71). Als merkantiler und administrativer Mittelpunkt der röm. Stadt entsprach das als großer Freiplatz mit rahmender Bebauung gestaltete F. grundsätzlich der Agora griech. Städte; die Lage am Schnittpunkt von decumanus und cardo in der Stadtmitte ist bei allen neua…

Follis

(627 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Klose, Dietrich (München)
[English version] [1] Blasebalg (φῦσα, Blasebalg). Das bereits bei Homer (Il. 18, 372; 412; 468-70) erwähnte Arbeitsgerät des Schmiedes ist in der griech. Kunst vor allem mit Hephaistos verbunden (Schatzhaus von Siphnos, Delphi), jedoch auf Werkstattdarstellungen selten. In den Werkstätten befanden sich zwei (Hdt. I 68) oder mehrere (Hom. Il. 18,468-470) folles. In der röm. Kunst ist der f. ebenfalls relativ selten dargestellt; auf einem Grabstein eines Schmiedes in Aquileia (Mus. Inv. Nr. 166) hält der Arbeiter am f. einen Schutzschirm vor sich; ein Fresko im Vettier-Hau…

Pallium

(240 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Ein dem griech. Himation entsprechender röm. Mantel aus einer rechteckigen Stoffbahn; als Materialien dienten Wolle, Leinen oder Seide. Das P. konnte unterschiedlich gefärbt (weiß, diverse Rottöne, gelblich, schwarz), golddurchwirkt und mit Purpurstreifen versehen sein. Es ist seit dem 3. Jh.v.Chr. bekannt, und anfänglich trugen es nur Freunde der griech. Kultur, Philosophen u.a. (Liv. 29,10); doch es erfreute sich recht bald aufgrund seiner Bequemheit und einfachen Tragweise grö…
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