Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)" )' returned 469 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Xenon group

(245 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A special group of South Italian vases, named after a label on a pot in Frankfurt with the charioteer Xenon preparing to start [1]. The decoration of XG vases was applied with red slip to a pot covered with dark glaze (Gnathia ware). The pots (Pottery) used are quite small in scale. Decoration is chiefly limited to ornamentation (Ornaments) such as ivy and laurel branches, rod ornaments, wavy lines, meanders etc.; in contrast, representations of animals or people are distinctly ra…

Cradle

(193 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λίκνον/ líknon, σκάφη/ skáphē; Lat. cunae, cunabula, n. pl.). The líknon, actually the ‘grain rocker’, was used as a cradle (H. Hom. 4,150; 254; 290; 358; [1. 298, fig. 285]; cf. Callim. H. 1,48). A container similar to a tub served as a second form of the cradle (Soph. TrGF IV, 385; Ath. 13,606f; 607a;   scáphē ). There were often notches or small struts on the frame of the cradle for attaching cords. Safety belts could be drawn crosswise over the cradle. From time to time two children could be accommodated in them (Plut. Romulus 3,4). Depictions of infants in skáphai are know…

Ephedrismos

(156 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἐφεδρισμός; ephedrismós). A game where a target (δίορος; díoros) on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball; the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Boys and girls participated in ephedrismos, which according to the evidence of monuments became popular in the 5th cent. BC and is depicted in various stages. The representations also show satyrs and Erotes playing ephedrismos. The piggyback motif is very widespread in the Greek and Roman art (intaglios, sculpture; group in Ro…

Kemos

(92 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κημός; kēmós, late Ancient Greek χάμος; chámos; Lat. c[h]amus, -um). Kemoi cover a variety of objects that apparently relate to the basic concept of wrapping, covering, etc. Part of these are nosebags for horses, from which they take their fodder (Hesych. s.v.), as well as bow nets for fish, and the type of cloth that bakers tied around their mouth and nose (Ath. 12,548c) and that women wore in public to cover the lower part of their face. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. Schenkl, s.v. K., RE 11, 157-162.

Alveus

(128 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Trough-shaped container; actually cavity, vault or trough. The alveus served as wine press trough, bath for newborn children and as hot-water bath tub for one or more persons. Moreover, alveus can also mean a sarcophagus. In archaeological research alveus designates a large hip bath built in stone or brick, in the caldarium of the Roman thermae [1] (the smaller versions were called alveolus), which were heated by the praefurnium above the testudo alvei, a semicircular kettle. Functionally allied with the alveus are solium and   labrum . Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bi…

Swaddling Clothes

(139 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σπάργανον/ spárganon; Latin incunabula). SC in their modern form were not known in Antiquity; instead, a baby would be wrapped entirely - apart from the head - with narrow strips of wool. Wrapping was supposed to ensure the striaght growth of the body and the limbs (Sen. Ben. 6,24,1,  cf. Plin. HN 7,3). In Thessaly only the lower half of the body was wrapped, in Sparta SC were dispensed with entirely (Plut. Lycurgus 16,3). Depictions of babies survive from the Bronze Age onwards (e.…

Lakonikai

(64 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λακωνικαί; lakōnikaí). Men's shoes or boots, similar to the embas ( Shoes). Originally a Lacedaemonian (Spartan) phenomenon (Aristoph. Vesp. 1158-1165), later also worn elsewhere (Aristoph. Eccl. 74; 269; 345; 507, Aristoph. Thesm. 142); the elegant lakonikai were white (Ath. 215c) and red (Poll. 7,88). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography O. Lau, Schuster und Schusterhandwerk in der griech.-röm. Lit. und Kunst, 1967, 126f.

Orarium

(138 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also called sudarium). The use of a 'face-cloth' ( orarium) or 'sweat-cloth' ( sudarium) is attested from the 1st cent. BC (Quint. Inst. 6,3,60; 11,3,148); it was used to wipe away sweat, cover the mouth (Suet. Nero 25), cover the head (Suet. Nero 45) or dry the hands (Petron. 67). It could also be worn around the neck (Suet. Nero 51; Petron. 67). According to Catull. 12,14 and 25,7, sudaria were made of Spanish linen. The name orarium does not emerge until the 3rd cent. AD; the two were used synonymously, with the orarium now being used for applause in arenas, for cover…

Plaga

(227 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Roman hunting net Roman hunting net, esp. for entrapment, into which game (stags, boars) was flushed from cover by dogs (Hor. Epod. 2,31-32; Hor. Epist. 1,6,58; 1,18,45), and so contrasts with the retia ('strike nets') and casses ('drop or purse nets'); of plagae plaited from rope, those from Cumae were the most highly valued (Plin. HN 19,11). The battue with the plaga, depicted in ancient art from early times (Vaphio Cup), later became primarily a theme of Roman mosaic and sarcophagus art. The term plaga is no longer used in modern archaeological scholarship, …

Pilos

(175 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πῖλος/ pîlos). Originally the term for the felt lining of helmets (Hom. Il. 10,265), shoes and caps (Hes. Op. 542-546) and the protective part of the armour (Thuc. 4,34,4), later for felt blankets (Hdt. 4,73 and 75) and shoes of felt (Cratinus 100 CAF), but esp. for a conical headdress (Hes. Op. 546, Anth. Pal. 6,90 and 199, cf. Hdt. 3,12; 7,61; 62; 92 on the felt mitres and tiaras of eastern peoples). The last resembles half an egg (Lycoph. 506), at times with a loop on the point for hanging up or carrying by the finger. The pîlos was worn by craftsmen (in pictorial represen…

Neck ornaments

(655 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A. Greece Neck ornaments famously play a role in the myth of Eriphyle, as they do in that of Scylla (Aesch. Choe. 613-622). The comedy Plókion by Menander also deserves mention (cf. Plut. Mor. 2,141d; Gell. 2,23,6). In Aristaen. 1,1 the stones of the necklace are organised in such a way that they give the name of Lais. Neck ornaments (ἁλύσιον/ halúsion, κάθημα/ káthēma, μάννος/ mánnos, μανιάκης/ maniákēs, ὅρμος/ hormos, πλόκιον/ plókoin) as a chain or a rope, with and without pendants, have survived in great numbers throughout the Mediterranean since…

Kekryphalos

(246 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κεκρύφαλος, -άλιον; kekrýphalos, -álion, Lat. reticulum), hair net, hair cloth. Mentioned already in Hom. Il. 22,469 as part of the female costume, the kekryphalos was used to cover the hair or parts thereof. Greek (cf. e.g. Aristoph. Thesm. 257) and Roman women wore a kekryphalos not only at night to keep their carefully arranged hairstyle together, but also during the day (Varro, Ling. 130; Non. 14,32 et al.). Men who occasionally were seen to wear a kekryphalos were criticized (Ath. 15,681c; Juv. 2,96) and perceived as effeminate. As a cloth, the kekryphalos could b…

Paludamentum

(262 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Rectangularly cut, mostly purple but also red or white, Roman cloak of linen or wool, corresponding to the Greek chlamys; Agrippina's gold-braided paludamentum is, however, unusual (Plin. HN. 33,63). Initially paludamenta were worn only by Roman generals and other high-ranking officers; they advanced in the imperial period to insignia of Imperial ruling power. Paludamenta were part of the battle dress of generals and emperors (cf. Varro Ling. 7,37) and were not to be worn within the limits of the city of Rome (Tac. Hist. 2,89); thu…

Fimbriae

(153 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κροσσοί/ krossoí; θύσανοι/ thýsanoi). These were actually the thread ends left at the edge of the cloth that ─ with several knotted together or hanging individually ─ decorated materials of all kinds such as cloths, blankets and clothes. They could also be worked separately and sewed on. Thus, for example, the ταραντῖνον ( tarantînon), a luxury garment, or the rica, a Roman head scarf, are explicitly defined as trimmed with fimbriae (Fest. 288,10; Non. 549,9). The Oriental and Egyptian garments already show evidence of fimbriae; they are also documented in Greek…

Trigon

(122 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman ball game, recorded for the Imperial period; it was played on the Field of Mars  (Hor. Sat. 1,6,126) and in baths (Petron. 27,1-3). Three players (Mart. 7,72,9) were needed for trigon; they positioned themselves in a triangle and played one or more small balls between themselves, either catching them (Mart. 12,82,4) or hitting them with both hands so that they were passed back to the thrower or to the third player (Mart. 14,46,1), sometimes with such violence that the palms …

Applause

(607 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κρότος, ἐπικροτεῖν [ krótos, epikroteîn], plausus, plaudere). The impulsive and impromptu expression of praise and approval, also of rejection, cursing and reprimand communicated through words, sounds, gestures and actions; these forms of expressing approval are so closely related to   acclamatio that it is often difficult to distinguish between them [1]. In the ancient world, the most frequent gesture used to express approval was the clapping of hands, for example, in the theatre, during music, danc…

Kalathos

(323 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὁ κάλαθος/ ho kálathos; diminutive τὸ καλάθιον/ tò kaláthion and ὁ/τὸ καλαθίσκος, -ν/ ho/tó kalathiskos, -n; Lat. calathus). A basket which opens like a blossom, made from a variety of materials such as clay, wood, precious metals (Hom. Od. 4,125). It can also be woven from rods [1]. It was used as a working basket by female wool spinners (e.g. Juv. 2,54; Ov. Ars am. 1,693 and 2,219) - and as such is a requisite of scenes of the women's quarters (e.g. Rhyton London, BM E 773 [2]) - or as a household receptacle for cheese, milk, or oil, which made the kalathos a common wedding pre…

Strophium

(208 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(στρόφιον/ stróphion). A band wound round something or twisted together. [German version] [1] Breast band A breast band worn by women in Greece and Rome (Aristoph. Thesm. 139; 251; 255; 638; Aristoph. Lys. 931; Catull. 64,65), also called μίτρα/ mítra (Anth. Pal. 5,13,4; Apoll. Rhod. 3,867), μηλοῦχος/ mēloûchos (Anth. Pal. 6,211), στηθόδεσμος/ stēthódesmos (Poll. 7,66), mamillare (Mart. 14,66 lem.), fascia pectoralis (Mart. 14,134 Lem., cf. Ov. Ars am. 3,274; Prop. 4,9,49). Women are variously portrayed in art wearing strophia or putting on strophia. Straps across the shoulde…

Umbrella, Parasol

(241 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σκιάδιον/ skiádion or σκιάδειον/ skiádeion; Latin umbella, umbraculum). Round, collapsible umbrellas and those with fixed frames had been familiar to the Greeks from the 5th cent. BC; as in the states of the Near East, in Greece too umbrellas were a status symbol and sign of dignity. Noble Greek women had them carried by a servant girl (Athen. 12,534a, cf. Ael. VH 6,1). For Greek men, carrying an umbrella was considered a sign of effeminacy (Pherecrates PCG 7, 70 (64)). In Antiquity, um…

Lakaina

(116 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λάκαινα; lákaina). A drinking vessel listed as a cup in Ath. 11,484f.; the technical term is used in archaeological research to describe a vessel with a goblet-like body and round-bellied lower part, with two horizontal handles. Produced predominantly in Sparta from the 8th cent. BC onwards, the L. became a model for Laconian vasepainting of the 7th cent. BC. The design was discontinued after the middle of the 6th cent. BC. Its decoration was usually ornamental, but black- glazed examples do occur. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. M. Stibbe, Lakon. Vasenma…

Chests

(267 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ζύγαστρον/ zýgastron, κιβωτός/ kibōtós, κιβώτιον/ kibṓtion, λάρναχ/ lárnax, χηλός/ chēlós; Latin arca, cista). Chests made of wood, bronze or other materials were used in the household for storing and transporting clothes, household goods, book rolls (  scrinium), equipment, provisions, etc. Chests could be simple and undecorated, or decorated with ornamental or figurative reliefs on their sides ( Praenestine cistae). Wooden chests often had metal fittings, which were also decorated, for reinforcing edges and corne…

Games

(1,734 words)

Author(s): Nissen | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Egypt and Ancient Orient The boundaries between games and  sport are fluid; here only relaxation games ( Board games) are treated that are very well known e.g. for Egypt as originals from tomb contexts and pictorial representations e.g. the Senet board game ( znt) was popular. The position regarding the sources for the Ancient Orient is very limited for climatic reasons (wood barely preserved). We can make only assumptions about the rules of games. In addition to the game boards there are game stones, astragaloi ( Astragalos [2]), dice and little dice rods tha…

Sportula

(118 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ( sporta, sportella). Roman basket (Isid. Orig. 20,9,10; Petron. Sat. 40) used for shopping (Apul. Met. 1,24 and 25), the term is also used for a  basket which held money or food for clients (Petron. 40;  Juv. 1,95 f.; Salutatio ). Hence sportula denoted a feeding of the public (cf. Suet. Claudius 21,4) or a fee due to the magistrates for their official activities. In the 4th and 5th cents. AD, the fees that were charged by court magistrates for their services were also called sportula (Cod. Iust. 3,2). Donativum Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. A. Cahn et al., …

Shoes

(752 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] According to ancient literature (Poll. 5,18; 7,85-94; 10,49; Herodas 7,54 ff.), there was a great multiplicity of varieties of sandals and boots; only in a small number of cases is it possible to identify footwear mentioned by name with that represented in monumental art or with surviving originals (e.g. calceus ). From Classical Greece alone we have 82 words for footwear, named after origin, people, shape, colour, material or use: many kinds of footwear were adopted from other countries and given the name of their country of origin, e.g. 'Persian shoes', Περσικαί/ Pe…

Darius Crater

(159 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Apulian voluted crater from  Canosa (found in 1851) in Naples (NM, Inv. 81947 [H 3,253], H 130cm, [1]), known as the eponymous work of the  Darius Painter named after it. The main face has the crown council of Darius in the centre [1] I., with paymasters and tribute bearers below and Athena with Hellas before Zeus and Apate before Asia above. Archaeological study interprets this as a representation of the victories of  Alexander' [4] the Great in Persia or an echo of contemporary …

Wig

(282 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (φενάκη/ phenákē, πηνήκη/ pēnḗkē, Latin capillamentum, galerus). The use of wigs apparently began in Greece at the end of the 6th cent. BC; late Archaic korai show hairstyles that are inconceivable without added hairpieces. In the theatre, too, people made use of wigs in the 5th cent. BC (Aristoph. Thesm. 258) and also used false beards (Aristoph. Eccl.25), musicians and conjurers similarly wore wigs and hairpieces (Ael. VH 1,26; Lucian Alexandros 3). The use of wigs and hairpieces was extremely popular i…

Wineskin

(173 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀσκός/ askós; Lat. culleus, uter). For transporting solid (Thuc. 4,26) and liquid foods (Hom. Il. 3,247; Hom. Od. 5,265; 9,196), apart from barrels, people also used animal (ox, sheep, goat; in the Arab lands also camel, Hdt. 3,9) skins sewn together, a leg of the animal serving as inlet and outlet. Representations of wineskins are common in ancient art in transportation scenes; a wineskin-carrying silen is a fixed feature of the iconography of Dionysian scenes (Dionysus). In myths, …

Epiblema

(76 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἐπίβλημα; epíblēma). Greek term for  blanket, cloth, coat (Poll. 7,49f.). In modern-day archaeological terminology, epiblema denotes the shoulder-covering of Daedalic female statues, esp. those from Crete. As a rule the epiblema is fastened at the breast, but also across the neck and collarbone; the upper edge is occasionally decorated. The epiblema is frequently depicted on 7th-cent. BC monuments. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Mortar

(231 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὅλμος/ hólmos, ἴγδις/ ígdis, θύεια/ thýeia, ὕπερον/ hýperon, Latin mortarium, pistillum, pila). Mortars and pestles of various materials were among the household utensils (Plaut. Aul. 94-95; Household equipment) necessary for kneading dough, grinding corn, chopping and mixing fruits, vegetables, etc. Mortars were also used for preparing cosmetics and drugs, pigments and metal alloys. Mortars included smaller grinding bowls (with or without a lip and round grinding stone, called a coticula in Latin, Plin. HN 34,106; made of granite for eye ointment…

Arca

(216 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λάρναξ; lárnax). Box, case, chest, then especially the treasure chest of wood or metal-jointed wood in the atrium (Juv. 11,26; 14,259 and passim), of which there are known examples or remains of examples in Pompeii. Arca was the term used for a large number of sacred, state and private treasures, e.g. the one of the virgines vestales. The arca could be large enough for a person to hide inside (App. B Civ. 4,44). Small arcae are preserved from late antiquity which were given to one's wife as a present with congratulatory messages and their metal fitting…

Dipylon Painter

(303 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Attic vase painter of the geometric period (Late Geometric I, mid 8th cent. BC;  Geometric vase painting), named after the cemetery at the Dipylon Gate in Athens, where most of his works were found. The Dipylon Painter (DP) and the other painters of his workshop created about 20 monumental vases (kraters; amphorae), which were placed on tombs as receptacles for offerings ( Burial); of these, the amphora Athens, NM 804, with a height of 155 cm (the stand has been replaced and thus …

Solium

(184 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Seat Roman high seat with foot-, arm- and backrest, throne; the solium was the seat of kings (Ov. Fast. 3,358; 6,353) and, presumably as early as in Etruria, the symbolic seat of a pater familias . It was inherited from father to son, selling it was considered shameful ( Salutatio ). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography F. Prayon, Frühetrurische Grab- und Hausarchitektur, 1975, 111 f.  Th. Schäfer, Imperii Insignia. Sella curulis und Fasces. 29. Ergänzungsheft MDAI(R), 1989, 26 f. [German version] [2] Bathtub Roman bathtub for one (Mart. 2,42; Vitr. 9 …

Clavus

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ‘Nail’, in the context of  clothing: ‘stripes’. The decoration of a  tunic with purple clavi extending from the shoulder to the lower seam at the front and back, served to denote rank in Rome. Senators, their sons (since Augustus) and officials wore a tunic with broad stripes ( lati clavi), equestrians one with small stripes ( angusti clavi). The clavi could be woven in or sewn on, cf.  Dalmatica. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. R. Goette, Studien zu röm. Togadarstellungen, 1990, 8-9 J. Bergemann, Röm. Reiterstatuen, 1990, 23-24 B. Levick, A Note on the …

Calenian Pottery

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Generic term for lower Italian black-glazed pottery ( Relief ware), evident from the second half of the 4th cent. to the 2nd cent. BC. The term Calenian Pottery (CP) (askoi, bowls, omphalos phialae, gutti) is commonly used for this group of vessels, yet they were undoubtedly also produced in other regions (Paestum, Sicily, Tarentum). Particularly well-known are bowls with medallions, worked in a medium relief (‘Arethusa bowls’); their origin from Cales (Calenus) or rather Campania…

Nestoris

(182 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A type of ‘Italian’ vase, also called trozella, which was adopted by Lucanian vase painting in the 5th cent. and by Apulian vase painting only around the middle of the 4th cent. BC. The nestoris appears to have been taken on from Messapian vase art. It is known in various forms; typical is its ovoid body with side handles and strap handles (which rise up from the shoulder of the vessel and connect to its lip) which are often decorated with discs (rotellae) [1. 11 fig. 3]. In vase …

Pilleus

(212 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also pileus). Close-fitting half-spherical or ball-shaped head covering made of fur, felt, leather or wool; adopted by the Romans from the Etruscans (cf. Liv. 34,7). In Rome the pilleus was the mark of a free citizen and was given a slave (Petron. Sat. 41), prisoner of war, or gladiator (Tert. De spectaculis 21) upon manumission. Thus the pilleus libertatis, together with the vindicta , is the attribute of Libertas, who holds them in her hands on Roman coins. P illeus can be used synonymously as an expression for freedom (Mart. 2,68; Suet. Nero 57, cf. Plau…

Chiton

(507 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (χιτών; chitón). Greek undergarment, originally of linen, then wool; probably of Semitic origin ( Clothing). Frequent occurrences in Homer (e.g. Il. 2,42; 262; 416; 3,359; Od. 14,72; 19,242), show that the chiton was already a part of Greek costume in early times, and a favoured garment for men. The chiton came into fashion for women during the 1st half of the 6th cent. BC, and later replaced the  peplos (vase paintings, sculptures). The chiton consists of two rectangular lengths of material ( ptéryges, wings), 150-180 cm wide and of varying length, sewn toget…

Recta

(107 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The first time the Roman boy donned the toga virilis, he wore the ( tunica) recta as an undergarment; for the sons of equestrians and senators, it was furnished with the insignia of rank ( latus clavus). The long, white tunica with tight upper sleeves which the Roman bride donned on the eve of her wedding, which she slept in and wore on her wedding day was called recta or regilla (Plin. HN 8,194). Clothing; Toga Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography Blümner, PrAlt., 336, 350 f.  C. M. Wilson, The Clothing of the Ancient Romans, 1938, 138-145  D. Balsdon, Die Frau in der röm…

Mantele

(147 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] ( mantellum, mantelium, χειρόμακτρον/ cheirómaktron). Ein rechteckiges Tuch aus Leinen mit Borten und Fransen; es diente bei Kulthandlungen als Handtuch, das die Opferdiener bei sich trugen, bei Mahlzeiten zum Reinigen der Hände (z.B. Xen. Kyr. 1,3,5) und als Tischtuch (Mart. 12,28). Bei Sappho (99 Diehl) wird das cheirómaktron als Kopfschmuck erwähnt. In seinen hauptsächlichen Funktionen als Tisch- und Handtuch entspricht das m. der mappa, die zudem ein beliebtes Geschenk an den Saturnalien war (Mart. 5,18,1). Seit Nero (Suet. Nero 22) ist …

Badehose

(86 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ᾤα λουτρίς, subligar). Beim gemeinsamen Bad in den Badeanstalten trugen Männer und Frauen einen Schamgürtel bzw. ein Badetuch (Poll. 7,66; 10,181, perizoma , subligaculum ) aus Schafsfell oder Stoff, Frauen auch eine Brustbinde (Vasenbilder, “Bikinimädchen” aus Piazza Armerina). Für Männer konnte die B. ( aluta, Mart. 7,35,1) aus Leder sein. Im Pap. Cair. Zen. 60,8 wird eine ἐκλουστρίς erwähnt. Ungewiß ist das Tragen einer Haube ( vesica). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography R. Ginouvès, Balaneutikè, 1962, 223-225  W. Heinz, Röm. Thermen. Badewesen u…

Arca

(201 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (λάρναξ). Kasten, Kiste, Truhe, dann speziell die Geldtruhe aus Holz oder metallbeschlagenem Holz im Atrium (Iuv. 11,26; 14,259 u.ö.), von denen Exemplare bzw. deren Reste aus Pompeji bekannt sind. A. hießen eine große Anzahl sakraler, staatlicher und privater Geldkassen, z. B. die der virgines vestales. Die A. konnten so groß sein, daß sich eine Person darin verbergen konnte (App. civ. 4,44). Aus der Spätant. haben sich kleine A. erh., die als Geschenke mit Glückwunschformeln an die Frau überreicht wurden und auf ihrem Me…

Paragauda

(124 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (παραγαύδης). Eine erst im 3. Jh.n.Chr. belegte Bezeichnung für eine goldene oder purpurne Borte in Form eines griech. Gammas (Γ), die in ein Gewand eingewebt war (SHA Claud. 17,6); dann auch übertragen auf ein dem Ärmelchiton (Chiton) ähnliches Gewand ( paragaúdion) aus feinem Seidenstoff, das der röm. Kaiser je nach Verdienst mit einer bis fünf Borten als Auszeichnung vergab (SHA Aurelian. 15,4,46; SHA Probus 4,5). Von daher war das Tragen des Gewandes Privatpersonen verboten (Cod. Theod. 10,21,1 und 2). Aufgrund de…

Quadriga

(496 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (τετραορία/ tetraoría, τέθριππον/ téthrippon; lat. meist im Pl. quadrigae). Viergespann, der mit vier nebeneinander laufenden Pferden bespannte zweirädrige Wagen, der stehend gelenkt wurde, nach ant. Trad. von Trochilos oder Erichthonios [1] (Verg. georg. 3,113, vgl. Plin. nat. 7,202) erfunden. In den homerischen Epen werden Viergespanne recht selten erwähnt (z. B. Hom. Il. 8,185; 11,699), tauchen dann aber in der lit. Überl. z. B. bei myth. Wettfahrten (Oinomaos und Pelops, vgl. Philost…

Kranz

(621 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (στέφανος/ stéphanos, στεφάνη/ stephánē, lat. corolla, corona). Aus Blumen, Blättern und Zweigen geformt oder in deren Nachbildung (Bronze, Silber, Gold; s. z.B. [1]) gefertigt, ist der K. Bestandteil griech. und röm. Alltags- und Kulturlebens, ein Symbol der Weihung, Auszeichnung und des Schmuckes für Menschen und Götter; der K.-träger hob sich aus den anderen hervor (vgl. Apul. met. 11,24.4), und ihn anzugreifen war verwerflich (vgl. Aristoph. Plut. 21). K. werden seit mythischer Urzeit getragen (Tert. De corona 13). K. sind im Kult unerläßlich (FGrH 33…

Monopodium

(124 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (griech. trápeza monópus, Poll. 10,69). Runde oder viereckige Tische mit nur einer zentralen Stütze, deren Fuß aus floralen oder myth. Figuren gebildet sein konnte. Im Griech. sind solche Tische seit der Archaik bekannt, werden aber erst im Hell. häufiger; in Rom waren monopodia seit ihrem Bekanntwerden (erstmals im Triumph von 187 v.Chr. mitgeführt, Liv. 39,6,7; Plin. nat. 34,14) sehr beliebt und haben sich v.a. aus den Vesuvstädten erhalten. Varro (ling. 5,125) erwähnt das cartibulum, das im compluvium stand, um Geschirr aufzunehmen. Delp…

Cesnola-Maler

(175 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Benannt nach seinem ehem. in der Cesnola-Sammlung befindlichen Krater spätgeom. Zeit (H. 114,9 cm mit Deckel, aus Kourion/Zypern, jetzt New York, MMA, Inv. 74. 51. 965; geometrische Vasenmalerei). Der anonyme Vasenmaler verbindet in seinen Werken vorderasiatische mit mutterländischen und inselgriech. Motiven. Die ungewöhnliche Form des eponymen Kraters wie auch die Kombination der auf ihm angebrachten Motive führten in der Vergangenheit zu Diskussionen über die Datier. und Herkun…

Lukanische Vasen

(286 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Die Produktion der rf. L.V. setzt in den J. um 430 v.Chr. mit dem Pisticci-Maler ein, benannt nach einem Fundort seiner Vasen. Er steht noch ganz in att. Trad., die sich in der stilistischen Behandlung seiner Personen, der Ornamente und Gefäßformen äußert; er bevorzugt Glockenkratere, die er mit Verfolgungs- und Alltagsszenen oder dionysischen Bildern ziert. Seine Nachfolger, der Amykos- und der Kyklops-Maler, haben sich offenbar in Metapontium niedergelassen und hier eine Werkst…

Sabanum

(83 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Ein grobes leinenes röm. Tuch, das zum Abtrocknen und Abreiben des Körpers nach dem Bade (Apul. met. 1,23, vgl. Mart. 12,70) bzw. als Umhang diente, um nach einem Dampfbad ins Schwitzen zu kommen; des weiteren nutzte man das s. zum Auspressen der Honigwaben und Umhüllen der Speisen beim Kochen (Apicius 6,215; 239). In der Spätant. verstand man unter s. ein leinenes, mit Gold und Edelsteinen geschmücktes Gewand (Ven. Fort. vita S. Radegundis 9) bzw. einen Mantel. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Salutatio

(418 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (“Begrüßung”). Der morgendliche Empfang der Klienten ( cliens, clientes ) durch den patronus diente als Aufwartung, zur Entgegennahme von Ratschlägen (Hor. epist. 2,1,102) und von Unterstützung z. B. durch Geld ( sportula ). Er fand in den ersten beiden Morgenstunden statt (Mart. 4,8); hierbei hatte der Klient ( salutator) in der toga zu erscheinen (Iuv. 3,126 f.), weswegen Martial (3,46,1) den Klienteldienst auch togata opera nennt. Die Besucher versammelten sich im vestibulum oder atrium des Hauses ihres patronus und warteten auf Einlaß (Hor. epist. 1,5…

Epostrakismos

(56 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἐποστρακισμός). Knabenspiel, bei dem man eine Scherbe oder einen flachen Stein so auf das Wasser warf, daß er aufschlug und weiterhüpfte. Sieger war derjenige, dessen Stein oder Scherbe am weitesten flog und am häufigsten sprang (Poll. 9, 119; Hes. s.v. E.; Min. Fel. 3; Eust. in Hom. Il. 18,543). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Brattea

(232 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πέταλον). In der arch. Terminologie ungebräuchlicher ant. Begriff; im Griech. urspr. nur als “Blatt, Laub eines Baumes” (Hom. Il. 2,312; Od. 19,520), bei Bakchyl. 5,186 “Kranz des Ölbaums von Olympia”, spätestens im 2.Jh. v.Chr. als artifizielles Erzeugnis für die Blätter des Goldkranzes (Kranz) verstanden. In röm. Quellen bezeichnet b. eine auf einen Gegenstand aufgelegte dünne Folie aus Metall, meist Silber oder Gold, auch Furniere aus kostbarem Holz (Plin. nat. 16,232) oder Schildpatt (Mart. 9,59,9), doch ist meist Blattgo…

Perücke

(263 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (φενάκη/ phenákē, πηνήκη/ pēnḗkē, lat. capillamentum, galerus). Die Verwendung der P. hat in Griechenland offenbar im ausgehenden 6. Jh.v.Chr. eingesetzt; die spätarcha. Koren zeigen Frisuren, die ohne angesetzte Haarteile nicht denkbar sind. Auch im Theater bediente man sich der P. im 5. Jh.v.Chr. (Aristoph. Thesm. 258) und nutzte auch falsche Bärte (Aristoph. Eccl.25), ebenso tragen Musiker und Gaukler P. und Haarteile (Ail. var. 1,26; Lukian. Alexandros 3). Der Gebrauch von P. und H…

Manicae

(278 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(χειρίς/ cheirís). [English version] A. Ärmel Bereits die minoisch-myk. Kleidung wies sowohl bis an die Handwurzel als auch kürzere bis zur Ellenbeuge oder nur bis zum Oberarm reichende Ärmel auf; in der archa. und klass. Zeit war der Chiton mit Ärmeln bei “Barbaren” (Perser, Skythen u.a.) üblich, wurde aber auch von Griechen getragen. An der röm. Tracht waren M. anfänglich ein Zeichen der Verweichlichung (Tunica) - so wird noch Commodus gerügt, weil er eine Tunica mit Ärmeln trug (Cass. Dio 72,17, vg…

Plaga

(224 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] [1] Römisches Jagdnetz Röm. Jagdnetz, speziell Fangnetz, in das Wild (Hirsche, Eber) durch Hunde bei der Treibjagd hineingehetzt wurde (Hor. epod. 2,31-32; Hor. epist. 1,6,58; 1,18,45) im Gegensatz zu den retia (Schlagnetzen) und casses (Fall- und Sacknetzen); von den aus Stricken geflochtenen plagae waren die aus Cumae am meisten geschätzt (Plin. nat. 19,11). Die Treibjagd mit der p., schon früh in der ant. Kunst dargestellt (Becher von Vaphio), war dann v.a. ein Motiv der röm. Mosaik- und Sarkophagkunst. Der Terminus p. ist in der mod. arch. Forsch. nicht …

Geschicklichkeitsspiele

(488 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] wurden vor allem von Kindern veranstaltet. Bei einem Teil dieser Spiele dienten Astragale, Nüsse, kleine Steine, Münzen, kleine Kugeln oder Scherben als Spielzeug (Kinderspiel), bei anderen Stöcke, Scheiben, Räder usw. Beliebt war das πεντάλιθα ( pentálitha) genannte G. (Poll. 9,126), bei dem man fünf Steine (Nüsse, Kugeln o.ä.) hochwarf und mit der Handfläche oder dem Handrücken wieder auffing; bei einem anderen G., dem orca-Spiel, warf man in ein sich oben verengendes Gefäß Nüsse, Steine u.a. (Ps.-Ov. Nux 85f.; Pers. 3,50); diesem Spiel äh…

Armarium

(197 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (Schrank). Neben der arca das zweite wichtige Möbel zum Aufbewahren von Sachgütern. A. scheint ein typisch röm. Einrichtungsgegenstand gewesen zu sein, der den Griechen erst spät zur Kenntnis gelangte ( purgiskos). In seiner Grundfunktion bezeichnet A. den Geräteschrank, dann auch den Schrank für Speisen, Geld und Schmuck; auch die Bücherschränke bzw. -regale der Bibliotheken hießen A. Ein …

Pallium

(240 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Ein dem griech. Himation entsprechender röm. Mantel aus einer rechteckigen Stoffbahn; als Materialien dienten Wolle, Leinen oder Seide. Das P. konnte unterschiedlich gefärbt (weiß, diverse Rottöne, gelblich, schwarz), golddurchwirkt und mit Purpurstreifen versehen sein. Es ist seit dem 3. Jh.v.Chr. bekannt, und anfänglich trugen es nur Freunde der griech. Kultur, Philosophen u.a. (Liv. 29,10); doch es erfreute sich recht bald aufgrund seiner Bequemheit und einfachen Tragweise grö…

Barbaron hyphasmata

(129 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (βαρβάρων ὑφάσματα). Als b.h. bezeichneten die Griechen die kostbaren medisch-persischen Gewänder, Stoffe, Decken u.a. mit bunten Ornamenten, detaillierten figürlichen Verzierungen, Misch- und Fabelwesen. Nach Griechenland gelangten b.h. durch Handel (Aristoph. Vesp. 1132ff.), als Beutegut (Hdt. 9,80) oder Geschenk (Athen. 2,48d). Als Weihung stiftete man b.h. in Heiligtümer (Paus. 5,12,4) oder man trug sie als Luxusgewänder zur Demonstration von Reichtum und Macht. Die b.h. führten zu Veränderungen der griech. Tracht (Zeira) und Textilien …

Apulische Vasen

(429 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Führende Gattung der rf. unteritalischen Vasenmalerei, ca. 430 - ca. 300 v. Chr., mit Produktionszentrum Tarent. Man unterteilt die a.V. in plain- und ornate-style, wobei in ersterem bei weitgehendem Verzicht auf Zusatzfarben vornehmlich Glocken-, Kolonettenkratere und kleinere Gefäßtypen mit einfachem Dekor und Kompositionen von einer bis vier Personen versehen werden (Sisyphos-, Tarporley-Maler). Myth. Themen bilden einen Schwerpunkt, daneben di…

Armschmuck

(297 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Bereits in den alten Kulturen des Vorderen Orients und Ägyptens war das Tragen von A. üblich (Schmuck). Im ägäischen Bereich sind Beispiele aus frühkykladischer Zeit, der min. und myk. Epoche bekannt. Man trug A. am Unterarm, oberhalb des Handgelenks oder am Oberarm, wobei A. des öfteren an beiden Armen, bzw. Unter- und Oberarmen gleichzeitig getragen wurde. Als Grundform diente ein Reif, der für Verzierungen und Inschr. ausreichend Platz bot und entweder völlig geschlossen oder …

Paludamentum

(256 words)

Latrunculorum ludus

(217 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Das Spiel, bei dem es darauf ankam, dem Gegner alle Steine durch geschicktes Setzen der eigenen zu schlagen, hat seinen Namen von lat. latro (“Söldner”, später auch “Bandit”); der Sieger erhielt den Titel Imperator (vgl. dazu SHA Proculus 13,2). Der Spielverlauf ist nicht völlig geklärt, doch aus den lit. Quellen (Varro ling. 10,22; Ov. ars 3,357f., vgl. 2,207; Sen. de tranquillitate animi 14,7; Laus Pisonis 190-208) ergibt sich ein ungefähres Bild: L.l. wurde von zwei Partnern an einem schachbrettähnlichem Spielbrett gespielt, das normalerweise 8 ×…

Karchesion

(79 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] [1] s. Schiffahrt s. Schiffahrt Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [English version] [2] Trinkgefäß Ein recht großes, dem Kantharos [1] ähnliches Trinkgefäß (Athen. 11,474e-475b; Macr. Sat. 5,21,1-6) für Wein (Mart. 8,56,14; Ov. met. 12,317), das nach Athen. 11,500f. zu den Gefäßen eines griech. Symposions gehörte, ferner im Röm. ein Opfergefäß (z.B. Ov. met. 7,246). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography W. Hilgers, Lat. Gefäßnamen, BJ, 31. Beih., 1969, 48; 140f.  S. Rottroff, Hellenistic Pottery, The Athenian Agora 29, 1997, 88f.

Mastruca

(60 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (auch mastruga). Sardisches Wort (Quint. inst. 1,5) für ein aus (Schaf-)Fell gefertigtes Gewand, eng am Körper liegend, ärmellos und bis auf die Oberschenkel reichend. Seine Träger galten bei den Römern als unzivilisiert (Cic. Scaur. 45d; Cic. prov. 15), so Alaricus bei Prud. in Symm. 1,659f. Bei Plaut. Poen. 1310-1313 auch als Schimpfwort verwendet. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Feder

(267 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κάλαμος,

Acclamatio

(305 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Rhythmisch oder sprechchorartig vorgetragene Zurufe, die Glückwunsch, Lob, Beifall, Freude oder Gegenteiliges ausdrücken. Neben der anfänglich bestehenden spontanen a. setzte sich im Laufe der Zeit eine festformulierte und bei bestimmten Anlässen immer wiederkehrende a. durch. Eine frühe Erwähnung der a. findet sich in Hom. Il. 1,22, daneben sind a. bei den Beschlüssen in griech. Volksversammlungen [1] oder Kultvereinen bekannt. In Rom wurde die a. bei Hochzeitszügen als Talasse und Hymen, Hymenaee io (Catull. 61-62; Liv. 1,9,12 oder bei Bestattungen als Vale, vale, vale gerufen (Varro bei…

Gruß

(1,108 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
I. Grußgebärden [English version] A. Handreichung Nach griech. und röm. Sitte gab man Gastfreunden, Familienmitgliedern, Vertrauten oder Freunden die rechte Hand und drückte sie fest (Hom. Il. 10,542 u.ö.; Xen. Kyr. 3,2,14; Aristoph. Nub. 81; Plut. Cicero 879; Plut. Antonius 952; Plut. de amicorum multitudine 94b), sowohl bei der Begrüßung (bei Plut. Caesar 708 schon eher Leutseligkeit) wie auch beim Abschied. Der Handschlag galt als Zeichen der Freundschaft und des Vertrauens (Xen. Kyr. 3,2,14; Liv. …

Griffel

(284 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(γραφίς, γραφεῖον; lat. stilus, graphium). [English version] [1] Werkzeug zum Zeichnen Werkzeug zum Zeichnen, auch Reißfeder genannt, s. Bautechnik, Bauwesen. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [English version] [2] Schreibgerät Schreibgerät für die mit einer Wachsschicht versehenen Holztäfelchen ( cera ). Mit dem spitzen unteren Ende des G. gravierte man den zu schreibenden Text auf die Täfelchen ein und konnte gegebenenfalls Schreibfehler mit dem oberen abgeflachten Ende wieder löschen, indem man das Wachs verstrich ( stilum vertere, z.B. Hor. sat. 1,10,72). Darstellungen …

Kreisel

(120 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (στρόβιλος, ferner βέμβηξ, κῶνος, στρόμβος, στρόφαλος, lat. rhombus, turbo). Das K.-Spiel war in der Ant. ein beliebtes Kinderspiel; der hölzerne, aus Buchsbaum gefertigte (daher auch lat. buxum genannte), mit Querrillen versehene K. wurde mit den Fingern in eine rotierende Bewegung versetzt und dann mit der Peitsche vorwärts getrieben (Verg. Aen. 7,373-383 in einem epischen Gleichnis; Kall. epigr. 1,9; Tib. 1,5,3; Anth. Pal. 7,89). Originale K. aus Ton, Bronze, Blei und anderen Materialien haben sich als…

Daunische Vasen

(194 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Keramikgattung der Italiker aus den heutigen Prov. um Bari und Foggia mit lokalen Produktionsorten bes. in Ordona und Canosa. Seit der Frühphase (um 700 v.Chr.) zeigen die Gefäße ein vom griech. Motivschatz unabhängiges geom. Dekor, das in roter und braun bis schwarzer Erdfarbe auf die handgeformten Gefäße aufgetragen wird. Dazu gehören Rauten-, Dreiecksmuster und Bandornament, Wellenlinie, Kreis, Kreuz, Quadrat, Bogen, Swastika u.a. (Ornament). Auch bei den Vasenformen erfolgte eine anfangs von gr…

Kamm

(370 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ὁ κτείς, lat. pecten). K. für Wolle und Kopfhaare waren bereits im vorgesch. Europa, Ägypten und Vorderasien bekannt. Sie waren aus unterschiedlichen Materialien (Oliven- oder Buchsbaumholz, Elfenbein, Knochen, später auch aus Bronze, Eisen) und konnten auch in der Form variieren (trapezförmig oder länglich). In der nachmyk. Zeit wurden sie auch zweizeilig gezahnt, wobei im letzteren Fall eine Seite enger angebrachte Zähne besaß. In der archa. Zeit kamen noch halbkreisförmige Kämme…

Purpurissum

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Kostbare Farbe und Schminke (Plin. nat. 35,44), hergestellt aus der Mischung von erhitztem Purpursaft und Silberton (bzw. -kreide, creta argentaria); p. fiel umso heller aus, je mehr man von dem Silberton hinzufügte. Als Malerfarbe war p. aufgrund seiner lebhaften Farbe sehr geschätzt (Plin. nat. 35,30; 35,44 f.; 35,49). Frauen nutzten p. zusammen mit Bleiweiß ( cerussa) zum Färben von Wangen und Lippen (vgl. Plaut. Most. 258, 261; Plaut. Truc. 290). Farben; Kosmetik Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Perservase

(148 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Apulischer Volutenkrater aus Canosa (1851 gefunden) in Neapel (NM, Inv. 81947 [H 3253], H 130 cm, [1]), aufgrund der zentralen Gestalt des Perserkönigs auch als “Dareioskrater” bezeichnet; eponymes Werk des danach benannten Dareios-Malers. Die Hauptseite zeigt im Zentrum den Kronrat des Dareios [1] I., darunter Zahlmeister und Tributträger, darüber Athena mit Hellas vor Zeus und Apate vor Asia. Die arch. Forsch. sieht darin eine Spiegelung der Siege Alexandros' [4] d.Gr. in Persi…

Matratze

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (τύλη/ týlē; lat. culcita, torus). M. bildeten das Auflager der griech. und röm. Kline (auf den Haltegurten der Kline liegend, Petron. 97,4) oder wurden unmittelbar auf den Boden gebreitet (Athen. 15,675a; Alki. 4,13,14; χαμεύνη/ chameúnē: Theokr. 7,133; 13, 33). Die Füllung der M. bestand aus Wolle, Stroh, Schilf, Seegras, Heu, Haaren, Federn, wobei die Federn germanischer Gänse bes. geschätzt waren (Plin. nat. 10,54, vgl. Ov. met. 8,655 zu Binsen). Daneben gab es das κνέφαλλον/ knéphallon (Poll. 10,42) und das τυλεῖον/ tyleíon, das feine Unterbett aus der …

Palimpsest

(320 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (παλίμψηστος [βίβλος/ bíblos oder χάρτης/ chártēs], lat. codex rescriptus). Das “wieder abgeschabte”, d.h. nach der Tilgung der ersten Beschriftung wieder zum Schreiben präparierte, Buch, Papyrus- oder Pergamentblatt. Den ersten Text wischte man mit einem Schwamm oder schabte ihn mit Bimsstein ab. Dieses Verfahren wurde schon in Äg. (z.B. PBerlin 3024, 12. Dyn., ab ca. 2000 v.Chr.) angewandt und war auch später normal, sei es aus Sparsamkeit (Cic. fam. 7,18,2), sei es aus Mangel an unbes…

Centuripe-Gattung

(138 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Buntbemalte Keramik des 3./2.Jh. v.Chr., benannt nach dem FO in Sizilien. Die Gefäßformen sind die Pyxis, Lekanis und der Lebes, selten andere Typen wie die Lekythos. Die in Temperafarben (weiß, pink, schwarz, gelb, rot, gold, vereinzelt auch grün und blau) auf die Grundierung des orangefarbenen Tons ausgeführte Bemalung (Akanthos-, Ranken- und architektonische Friese, Köpfe, Büsten) wird nur auf einer Seite des Gefäßes aufgetragen. Die Gefäße sind von beträchtlicher Höhe (50 cm …

Orarium

(126 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (auch sudarium). Der Gebrauch des “Gesichts”- ( o.) oder “Schweißtuches” ( sudarium) ist seit dem 1. Jh. v.Chr. bezeugt (Quint. inst. 6,3,60; 11,3,148); man benutzte es, um den Schweiß abzuwischen, den Mund zu bedecken (Suet. Nero 25), den Kopf zu verhüllen (Suet. Nero 45) und die Hände abzutrocknen (Petron. 67). Auch konnte man es um den Hals tragen (Suet. Nero 51; Petron. 67). Nach Catull 12,14 und 25,7 war das sudarium aus spanischem Leinen. Die Bezeichnung o. taucht erst seit dem 3. Jh.n.Chr. auf; beide werden syn. verwandt, wobei das o. jetzt zum Beifallspenden…

Naïskosvasen

(253 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Im 2. Viertel des 4. Jh.v.Chr. tritt mit der Darstellung des Naïskos (Diminutiv von naós, “Tempel”) auf unteritalischen Vasen eine neue Form der Grabmalsdarstellung auf, die wohl auf den Iliupersis-Maler zurückzuführen ist. In der apulischen Vasenmalerei sind N. nach der Mitte des 4. Jh.v.Chr. ungewöhnlich häufig, in den übrigen unterital. Kunstlandschaften eher die Ausnahme. Die N. sind speziell für den Totenkult hergestellte Vasen, deren Bildwelt nicht nur damit zusammenhängende Szenen, son…

Eintritts- und Erkennungsmarken

(425 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (σύμβολον, tessera). In Athen gab der Staat ab 450 v.Chr. den ärmeren Bürgern für den Besuch der Aufführungen im Dionysos-Theater Freibillets im Werte von zwei Obolen (θεωρικόν διόβολον); diese σύμβολα ( sýmbola) genannten E. gab man dem Theaterpächter, der dann dafür das entsprechende Geld aus der Staatskasse einzog. Die Einrichtung wurde später auf alle Bürger ausgedehnt, woran sich Zahlungen für die Teilnahme an Volksversammlungen und Gericht anschlossen. Zahlreiche bronzene Symbola aus der Zeit von der 2. …

Kothurn

(236 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ὁ κόθορνος, cot[h]urnus). Der griech. K. war ein hoher Schaftstiefel aus weichem Leder, der sich eng an Fuß und Bein anschmiegte (von daher als Synonym für einen anpassungsfähigen Menschen verwandt bei Xen. hell. 2,3,30-31) und mit Bändern umwickelt oder vorne an einem Schlitz am Schaft verschnürt wurde. Der K. wird als Frauenschuh erwähnt (Aristoph. Eccl. 341-346; Lys. 657), aber bes. oft von den eleganten Jünglingen bei Symposion und Komos getragen. Bevorzugte Fußbekleidung von …

Fächer

(376 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ῥιπίς, rhipís; flabellum). F. wurden im Orient und Ägypt. von alters her als Standessymbol verwandt. Nach Griechenland kam der F. wohl erst im 5. Jh. v.Chr.; Eur. Or. 1426-1430 (erste Erwähnung) nennt den F. noch “barbarisch”, doch avancierte er schnell zu einem der wichtigsten Requisiten der Frau (vgl. Poll. 10,127), die sich mit ihm selbst Luft zufächerte oder von einer Dienerin zufächern ließ (vgl. die flabellifera bei Plaut. Trin. 252 und der flabrarius als männliches Pendant bei Suet. Aug. 82). Auf griech. Vasen und an Terrakotten (“Tanagra-Fi…

Dalmatica

(117 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Langärmelige, bis zu den Knien fallende Tunica, benannt nach ihrem Herkunftsland Dalmatien; erstmals lit. an der Wende zum 2. Jh.n.Chr. erwähnt. Nach Ausweis der Schriftquellen und Denkmäler war die D. weiß mit purpurnem clavus , der von den Schultern senkrecht zum Saum führte; als Material dienten Wolle, Seide, Halbseide und Leinen. Die D. wird von Männern (im Dienst mit einem cingulum militiae) und Frauen getragen. Bereits im 3. Jh.n.Chr. wird sie in die liturgische Gewandung der Kirche übernommen und zur typischen Bekleidung der Diakone…

Lauf- und Fangspiele

(428 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Für L.- und F. boten sich Plätze und Straßen an (z.B. Kall. epigr. 1,9; Verg. Aen. 7,379), auf denen Kinder das Nachlaufen (Hor. ars 455f.; vgl. Hor. ars 412-415 evtl. Wettlaufen) oder das überaus beliebte Reifenschlagen spielen konnten (τροχός, trochus), das vor allem auf griech. Vasenbildern (auch bei Ganymedes [1]) abgebildet ist (Poll. 10,64). Nach Ausweis der röm. Quellen gehörte es geradezu zum Straßenbild (Mart. 14,168; 14,169; vgl. ebd. 12,168; 14,157); auch auf zugefrorenen Flüssen (Mart. 7,80,8) spielte man …

Mimik

(461 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Unter M. versteht man die Ausdrucksbewegungen (Mienenspiel) des gesamten Gesichtes oder einzelner Teile desselben, die eine momentane Befindlichkeit des Menschen spontan anzeigen oder absichtlich mit dem Ziel eines bestimmten Ausdrucks angenommen werden. M. ist vielfach situationsgebunden und wird durch Gesten (Gebärden, Gestus) ergänzt oder durch sie erst verständlich. Auf der Bühne werden die einzelnen Charaktere mit unterschiedlicher M. angezeigt (Maske, Mimos), ebenso ist die…

Lanx

(175 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Platte oder flache röm. Schüssel von unterschiedlicher Größe, Form (oval, vier- oder vieleckig) und Funktion; sie diente für Küchenarbeiten (z.B. Petron. 28,8), mehr aber noch zum Auftragen von Speisen wie Fisch, Fleisch und Geflügel (Mart. 7,48,3; 11,31,19); auf einer L. wurden die Trinkbecher gereicht. Auch im röm. Rechtsverkehr fand sie Verwendung. Außerdem wird sie als Folterinstrument erwähnt, und das Haupt Johannes des Täufers wurde auf einer L. präsentiert. Im Kult bezeich…

Bigae

(513 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Kurzform aus lat. biiugae (griech.: δίζυξ; συνωρίς); eigentlich zwei unter einem Joch gehende Tiere (Pferd, Rind, Maulesel), vornehmlich für Pferdegespanne verwandt. Neben den bereits aus der min.-myk. Kultur erh. Darstellungen auf Fresken, Sigelringen u.ä. bzw. den Modellen aus Ton oder Br., ist vor allem die lebendige Schilderung bei Homer (Il. 23,392f., Leichenspiele für Patroklos) eines Pferderennens im Zweigespann für die griech. Frühzeit zu erwähnen. Diese leichten Gespanne wu…

Akazie

(177 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἀκακία, Dioskurides 1,133; ἄκανθα, Theophr. h. plant. 6,1,3). Der bereits bei Hdt. 2,96 gen. ägypt. Schotendorn oder Gummibaum gehört zur im Mittelmeergebiet weit verbreiteten Gattung der Mimosengewächse. Der von dem Baum ausgeschwitzte Saft ( kommì, Gummi) fand bei den Ägyptern Verwendung bei der Einbalsamierung von Leichen (Hdt. 2,86), dann aber auch in der Humanmedizin (Augenheilkunde) und wurde in röm. Zeit teuer gehandelt (Plin. nat. 13,63). Den A.-saft verarbeitete man zu Mundpastillen (Plin. nat. 24,109) …

Acetabulum

(104 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Von lat. acetum (Essig); das kelchförmige Gefäß mit eingeschnürter Wandung diente zur Aufnahme von Essig und Honig, als Tisch- und Kochgefäß bzw. zum Wachsschmelzen; auch Becher der Taschenspieler. Das A. bestand meist aus Ton oder Glas, seltener aus Edelmetall. Sein Volumen war sehr gering (0,068 l [1]); bei Apicius (6,8,3) und Apici excerpta a Vindario VI ist A. auch ein Kochgefäß. catinus Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 F. Hultsch, s. v. A., RE I, 155 f. G. Hilgers, Lat. Gefäßnamen, BJ (Beih. 31), 1969, 33 f.  E. M. Stern, B. Schlick-Nolte, Frühes Glas d…

Kalathos

(276 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ὁ κάλαθος; Dim. τὸ καλάθιον/ kaláthion und ὁ/τὸ καλαθίσκος, -ν/ kalathískos/-n; lat. calathus). Sich blütenartig öffnender Korb aus unterschiedlichen Materialien wie Ton, Holz, Edelmetall (Hom. Od. 4,125), der auch aus Ruten geflochten sein kann [1]. Er diente als Arbeitskörbchen der Wollspinnerinnen (z.B. Iuv. 2,54; Ov. ars 1,693 und 2,219) - so ist er Requisit der Frauengemachszenen (z.B. Rhyton London, BM E 773 [2]) - oder im Haushalt als Behältnis für Käse, Milch oder Öl; daher konnte d…

Kekryphalos

(226 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κεκρύφαλος, -άλιον, lat. reticulum), Haarnetz, Haartuch. Bereits bei Hom. Il. 22,469 als Bestandteil der weiblichen Tracht erwähnt, diente der K. dazu, das Kopfhaar oder Teile desselben zu bedecken. Die griech. (vgl. z.B. Aristoph. Thesm. 257) und röm. Frau trug nicht nur nachts einen K., um die sorgfältig angeordneten Frisuren zusammenzuhalten, sondern auch bei Tag (Varro ling. 130; Non. 14,32 u.a.). Wenn vereinzelt Männer den K. trugen, war dies allerdings rügenswert (Athen. 15,6…

Alveus

(125 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] [1] Behälter Muldenförmiger Behälter; eigentlich Höhlung, Wölbung oder Trog. Der A. diente als Keltertrog, Wanne für neugeborene Kinder und als Warmwasserwanne für eine oder mehrere Personen im Bad. Ferner kann A. auch einen Sarkophag meinen. In der arch. Forschung bezeichnet A. eine gemauerte, große Sitzwanne im Caldarium der röm. Thermen (die kleinere Variante wurde alveolus genannt), die vom praefurnium aus über der testudo alvei, einem halbkreisförmigen Kessel, beheizt wurde. In der Funktion mit A. verwandt sind solium und labrum . Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamb…

Kredemnon

(168 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κρήδεμνον, lat. calautica, auch κάλυμνα/ kálymna, καλύπτρη/ kalýptrē). Allg. die oberste Bedeckung, auch eines Wein- oder Vorratsgefäßes (Hom. Od. 3,392) bzw. eines Mauerringes (Hom. Il. 16,100), dann aber mehr ein Kopftuch der Frauen, das die Schultern bedeckte und mit dem sie das Gesicht verhüllen konnten (Hom. Il. 14,184; 16,470; Hom. Od. 1,334). Im 5. Jh.v.Chr. nur noch poetisch verwendet (z.B. Eur. Phoen. 1490); die üblichen Ausdrücke für Schleier und speziell für Brautschleier waren kálymna und kalýptrē (vgl. Aischyl. Ag. 1178). Bereits auf den …

Askoliasmos

(132 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (Ἀσκωλιασμός). “Hüpfen auf einem Bein” (Plat. symp. 190d mit schol.; Aristoph. Plut. 1129 u.a.), auch “Schlauchhüpfen”. Von Eratosthenes (fr.22) und Didymos (schol. in Aristoph. ebd.) bei att. Kelterfesten als Tanzen auf einem Schlauch aus Schweins- oder Ziegenfell erwähnt, der mit Luft oder mit Wein gefüllt und - wie Poll. 9,121 schreibt - mit Öl eingerieben war, um das Stehen zu erschweren. Das mitunter erwähnte Fest Askolia ist eine Erfindung der Grammatiker. Eubolos (fr.8) erwähnt den a. auch als att. Volksbelustigung. Nach Verg. georg. 2,382-384 war der a. au…

Rasiermesser

(211 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ξυρόν/ xyrón; lat. novacula, cultellus, culter tonsorius). Zum Rasieren des Bartes und Abschneiden des Kopfhaares z. B. bei Trauer diente seit frühgriech. Zeit das R., das in zahlreichen Expl. überl. ist. Seine Länge konnte weit über 20 cm betragen; als Materialien für die Klinge dienten Eisen und Br., für den Griff Br., Elfenbein, Holz. Das R. ist in unterschiedlichen Formen belegt: So konnte es spatel- oder halbmondförmig, lang und schmal mit gerader oder geschwungener Klinge, breit…

Periskelis

(139 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (περισκελίς, περισκέλιον, lat. periscelis, periscelium). In der arch. Forsch. h. nicht mehr gebräuchlicher Terminus für ein einfaches Band aus Stoff oder Metall, das als Oberschenkelschmuck oberhalb des Knies von Frauen der niederen Schichten und Prostituierten (Hor. epist. 1,17,56; Alki. fr. 4; Petron. 67), seltener von Frauen aus höheren Kreisen getragen wurde (Petron. 67; Longos 1,5). Davon zu unterscheiden sind Spangen, die man oberhalb des Fußknöchels trug, sogenannte compedes (Petron. 67; Plin. nat. 33,39-40 und 152). Darstellungen solcher…

Probolion

(114 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (προβόλιον). Kurzer Speer (Hdt. 7,76), mehr aber noch Jagdspieß (Hesych. s. v. π.), bes. zur Eber- (Xen. kyn. 10; Philostr. imag. 1,28,5) und Löwenjagd; in der mod. arch. Forsch. als Terminus kaum verwendet, auch wenn man versucht hat, das p. auf Jagdszenen der minoisch-myk. und geom. Kunst zu erkennen (zu dem bei Philostr. imag. 1,2,2 als p. bezeichneten Attribut des Komos s. [1]). Des weiteren nannte man p. auch einen festen Platz, eine Festung (Xen. mem. 3,5,7; Dion. Hal. ant. 10,16,4). Jagd Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 A. Kossatz-Deissmann, s. v. K…

Chlamys

(244 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (χλαμύς). Schultermantel aus Wolle für Reisende, Krieger und Jäger. Die vielfach bunt gefärbte und bestickte ch. tritt im 6.Jh. v.Chr. auf und stammte urspr. aus Thessalien (Poll. 7,46; 10,124; Philostr. her. 674), wo sie auch als Siegespreis nach Agonen vergeben wurde (Eust. in Hom. Il. 2,732), oder Makedonien (Aristot. fr. 500 Rose). Charakteristisch ist ihre Tragweise: Die oval oder viereckig zugeschnittene Tuchbahn des Mantels wurde vertikal gefaltet, um die linke Körperseite gelegt, von vo…

Labronios

(49 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (λαβρώνιος, -ον). Pers. Luxusgefäß aus Edelmetall von unbekannter Form (groß, flach mit großen Henkeln, Athen. 11,484c-f, 784a, 500e). Da es bei Athenaios a.O. in Zusammenhang mit Lakaina und Lepaste (beides Gefäßarten) gen. wird, handelt es sich beim L. vielleicht um eine Trinkschalenart. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Kanun

(224 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (τὸ κανοῦν). Aus Weidenruten geflochtener, flacher Korb - auch ein Körbchen - von runder oder ovaler Form mit drei Henkeln; das K. konnte mitunter auch aus Br. (z.B. Hom. Il. 630) oder Gold (Hom. Od. 10,355; Eur. Iph. A. 1565) sein. Bereits bei Homer (Hom. Il. 9,217; Hom. Od. 1,148) als Haushaltsgegenstand erwähnt, um mit Brot, Zwiebeln (Hom. Il. 11, 630) u.a.m. beim Mahl auf den Tisch gestellt zu werden (Abfallkorb bei Hom. Od. 20,300 ?); ebenfalls bei Homer als Opfergerät im Ku…

Halsschmuck

(628 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] A. Griechenland Neben dem bekannten Mythos der Eriphyle spielt H. eine ähnliche Rolle bei Skylla (Aischyl. Choeph. 613-622); daneben sei die Komödie Plókion des Menander (vgl. Plut. mor. 2,141d; Gell. 2,23,6) erwähnt. Bei Aristain. 1,1 sind die Steine des H. so angeordnet, daß sie den Namen der Laïs ergeben. H. (ἁλύσιον, κάθημα, μάννος, μανιάκης, ὅρμος, πλόκιον) hat sich als Kette oder Reif, mit und ohne Anhänger seit der Frühzeit im gesamten Mittelmeergebiet in großer Anzahl erhalten, wobei Farb- und…
▲   Back to top   ▲