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Corinth, Gulf of

(399 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Κορινθιακὸς κόλπος; Korinthiakòs Kólpos). According to Str. 8,2,3, the Gulf of C. (the eastern section of which is today called Gulf of C., the western section ‘Gulf of Patras’ [Πατραϊκὸς κόλπος], was held to begin at the estuary of the Achelous or the Evenus on the coast of central Greece and Araxus (today the Cape of the same name Ἄκρα …

Apiolae

(64 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Town in  Latium, west of   mons Albanus ; exact location unknown (near  Bovillae?). A. was destroyed by  Tarquinius Priscus (HRR Valerius Antias F 11; Str. 5,3,4: Ἀπίολα; Apíola; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 3,49,2; Liv. 1,35,7); with the booty from A. he undertook the construction of the Capitoline Temple, and held magnificent games.…

Amasea

(266 words)

Caenus

(62 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Καῖνυς; Kaînys). The Italian foothills (modern Punta del Pezzo), from where the shortest distance between the mainland and Sicily ( Pelorias) across the  fretum Siculum was measured (Str. 6,1,5: 6 stades; Thuc. 6,1: 20 stades; Plin. HN 3,73: 12 stades; ibid. 86: 1.5 miles -- the modern measurement is about 3.2 km). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography Nissen, vol. 2, 962.

Xerxene

(46 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Ξερξήνη; Xerxḗnē). Region in Greater Armenia (cf. Armenia A.) on the upper reaches of the Euphrates (Str. 11,14,5; Plin. HN 5,83: Derzene; Steph. Byz. s. v. Καμβυσήνη; s. v. Ξ.) in the plain around modern Tercan. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)…

Segobrigii

(84 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Ligurian Celtic people settled around the mouth of the Rhodanus, whose king Nannus and his son Comanus appear in the founding legend of Massalia  (Iust. 43,3,4-13,  cf.  Aristot. fr. 503 R.). A connection with terms such as Segovii, Segobriga and Segovia is discussed. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography G. Barruol, Les peuples préromains du sud-est de la Gaule, 1969, 207 f.  D. Pralon, La légende de la fondation de Marseille, in: M. Bats et al. (eds.), Marseille greque et la Gaule (Études Massaliètes 3), 1992, 51-56.

Pharnaceia

(180 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Φαρνάκεια/ Pharnákeia, Φαρνακία/ Pharnakía, Latin Pharnacea). Port on the southern coast of the Black Sea (Pontos Euxeinos), founded by Pharnaces [1] I, probably after the occupation of Sinope in 183 BC while incorporating the population of Cotyora (S…

Theches

(105 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Θήχης; Thḗchēs). Mountain ridge in the east of the northern Anatolian peripheral mountain chain (Xen. An. 4,7,21; Diod. Sic. 14,29,3: τὸ Χήνιον ὄρος/

Cerausium

(49 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Κεραύσιον; Keraúsion). The springs of the Neda rise on Mount C., a part of the  Lycaeum, (Paus. 8,41,3); it is therefore to be localized in the mountainous region between the modern Likeo and Tetrazio. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography E. Meyer, s.v. K, in: RE Suppl. 9, 382.

Divona

(54 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Main town of the Celtic  Cadurci in Aquitania (now Cahors. dép. Lot); sources: Ptol. 2,7,9; CIL XIII 1541 [1]. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography A. Audin, J. Guey, P. Wuilleumier, Inscriptions latines découvertes à Lyon dans le pont de la Guillotière, in: REA 56, 1954, 297-347.

Tatta

(85 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Τάττα λίμνη; Tátta límnē). Largest lake in Asia Minor (Str. 12,5,4; Plin. HN 31,84), modern Tuz Gölü ('Salt Lake'), an undrained basin in the highlands of central Anatolia (Galatia), about 900 m above sea level, mean depth 1 m, According to…

Ager Albanus

(165 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Area between   lacus Albanus ,  Bovillae, and  Aricia, passed through by the   via Appia , origin…

Zagros

(273 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Ζάγρος/ Zágros). Alpine mountain range, with the same name today, which runs from the northwest to the southeast in southwestern Iran, stretching from the Armenian highlands to the Kūh-e Fūrġūn on the Gulf of Oman with an area of c. 1200 × 200 km. In ancient literature, the Z. is first mentioned in connection with the rebellion of Molon [1] against Antiochus [5] III as a mountain range which sometimes divides into individual chains, sometimes merges again into a single chain, and is broken up by deep gorges and valleys (Pol. 5,44,7: τὸ Ζάγρον ὄρος/ tò Zágron óros in the year 222 BC; cf. Pol. 5,54,8; 5,55,6 f. for the year 220 BC), and which divides Media from Mesopotamia. Isidorus [2] of Charax agrees when he (Stathmoi Parthenikoi § 3) describes the Z. as the borderline between Media and Chalonitis, the country on the left bank of the Tigris around Ctesiphon [2] (cf. Plin. HN 6,122; 6,131). This location is also found later in Strabo (11,12,4: τὸ Ζάγριον ὄρος/

Kainon Chorion, Kainon Phrourion

(116 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Καινὸν Χωρίον; Kainòn Chōríon, Καινὸν Φρουρίον; Kainòn Phrouríon). Pon…

Zela

(313 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Caesar | Christianity | Hellenistic states (Ζῆλα; Zêla). City in Pontus [2] (Str. 11,8,4; Plin. HN 6,8; Ptol. 5,6,10; Steph. Byz. s.v. Ζ.) on the River Hotan, a left-bank tributary of the Iris [3], modern Zile. Originally Z. was a 19th–cent. BC Assyrian trading post ( kārum; Assyrian Durchamit, Hittite Durmitta; cf. Str. 12,3,37), then a priest-state of Anaetis and the Persian deities Omanos and Anadates who were revered together with her, and the administrative centre of the royal eparchía of Zeloniti…

Segustero

(144 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Township at the confluence of the modern Buëch and the Druentia, modern Sisteron, in the département of Basses-Alpes, without a doubt a vicus of the civitas of the Vocontii in the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis (cf. Plin. HN 3,37), after Diocletian's province reform its own civitas ( Segesteriorum: Notitia Galliarum 16,7). Station on the heavily used stretch of road (cf. Sall. Hist. fr. 2,98,4 M.) from Arelate through Brigantio (modern Briançon), the Matrona [3] Pass (1854 m elevation) and Segusio to Augusta [5] Taurinoru…

Barbosthenes

(63 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Βαρβοσθένης; Barbosthénēs). Mountain, 14.8 km from Sparta, where  Nabis was defeated by Philopoemen in 192 BC (Liv. 35,27,13; 30,9 incorrect Barnosthenem), perhaps an eastward continuation of the  Olympus in the  Parnon near Vresthena or Varvitsa. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography C. Bursian, Geogr. von Griechenland 2, 1868, 117 n. 1 A. Forbiger, Hdb. [in titles] der Alten Geogr. 3, 1877, 679 n. 77.

Antinum

(45 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Town of the  Marsi (CIL IX 3839; 3845) on the upper reaches of the  Liris, modern Cività d'Antino. In the Roman imperial age, it was a municipium of the tribus Sergia. Remains of the town walls (polygonal stonework). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)

Keras

(31 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] [1] Golden Horn' (Κέρας; Kéras). Synonymous with Chrysokeras/‘Golden Horn’ (cf. Amm. Marc. 22,8,7). Byzantium Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) [German version] [2] see Gefäße, Gefäßformen/-typen (Drinking horn) see Rhyton

Apeliotes

(145 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Ἀπηλιώτης sc. ἄνεμος; Apēliṓtēs sc. ánemos). Apeliotes denotes the ‘wind that blows from the sunrise’ (east; warm and misty: Aristot. Mete. 364 a 21; b 28), the wind god responsible for this wind (allegory of Apeliotes with autumnal fruits held in his garments on the extant horologium of Andronicus in Athens: cf. Varro, Rust. 3,5,17), and in general the easterly point of the compass. The Ionian form of the name (cf. Hdt.4,22; 7,188) was retained in the Attic (cf. Thuc. 3,23,5; Eur. Cy…
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