Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)" )' returned 469 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Dipylon Painter

(303 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Attic vase painter of the geometric period (Late Geometric I, mid 8th cent. BC;  Geometric vase painting), named after the cemetery at the Dipylon Gate in Athens, where most of his works were found. The Dipylon Painter (DP) and the other painters of his workshop created about 20 monumental vases (kraters; amphorae), which were placed on tombs as receptacles for offerings ( Burial); of these, the amphora Athens, NM 804, with a height of 155 cm (the stand has been replaced and thus …

Solium

(184 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Seat Roman high seat with foot-, arm- and backrest, throne; the solium was the seat of kings (Ov. Fast. 3,358; 6,353) and, presumably as early as in Etruria, the symbolic seat of a pater familias . It was inherited from father to son, selling it was considered shameful ( Salutatio ). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography F. Prayon, Frühetrurische Grab- und Hausarchitektur, 1975, 111 f.  Th. Schäfer, Imperii Insignia. Sella curulis und Fasces. 29. Ergänzungsheft MDAI(R), 1989, 26 f. [German version] [2] Bathtub Roman bathtub for one (Mart. 2,42; Vitr. 9 …

Clavus

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ‘Nail’, in the context of  clothing: ‘stripes’. The decoration of a  tunic with purple clavi extending from the shoulder to the lower seam at the front and back, served to denote rank in Rome. Senators, their sons (since Augustus) and officials wore a tunic with broad stripes ( lati clavi), equestrians one with small stripes ( angusti clavi). The clavi could be woven in or sewn on, cf.  Dalmatica. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. R. Goette, Studien zu röm. Togadarstellungen, 1990, 8-9 J. Bergemann, Röm. Reiterstatuen, 1990, 23-24 B. Levick, A Note on the …

Calenian Pottery

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Generic term for lower Italian black-glazed pottery ( Relief ware), evident from the second half of the 4th cent. to the 2nd cent. BC. The term Calenian Pottery (CP) (askoi, bowls, omphalos phialae, gutti) is commonly used for this group of vessels, yet they were undoubtedly also produced in other regions (Paestum, Sicily, Tarentum). Particularly well-known are bowls with medallions, worked in a medium relief (‘Arethusa bowls’); their origin from Cales (Calenus) or rather Campania…

Nestoris

(182 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A type of ‘Italian’ vase, also called trozella, which was adopted by Lucanian vase painting in the 5th cent. and by Apulian vase painting only around the middle of the 4th cent. BC. The nestoris appears to have been taken on from Messapian vase art. It is known in various forms; typical is its ovoid body with side handles and strap handles (which rise up from the shoulder of the vessel and connect to its lip) which are often decorated with discs (rotellae) [1. 11 fig. 3]. In vase …

Pilleus

(212 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also pileus). Close-fitting half-spherical or ball-shaped head covering made of fur, felt, leather or wool; adopted by the Romans from the Etruscans (cf. Liv. 34,7). In Rome the pilleus was the mark of a free citizen and was given a slave (Petron. Sat. 41), prisoner of war, or gladiator (Tert. De spectaculis 21) upon manumission. Thus the pilleus libertatis, together with the vindicta , is the attribute of Libertas, who holds them in her hands on Roman coins. P illeus can be used synonymously as an expression for freedom (Mart. 2,68; Suet. Nero 57, cf. Plau…

Chiton

(507 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (χιτών; chitón). Greek undergarment, originally of linen, then wool; probably of Semitic origin ( Clothing). Frequent occurrences in Homer (e.g. Il. 2,42; 262; 416; 3,359; Od. 14,72; 19,242), show that the chiton was already a part of Greek costume in early times, and a favoured garment for men. The chiton came into fashion for women during the 1st half of the 6th cent. BC, and later replaced the  peplos (vase paintings, sculptures). The chiton consists of two rectangular lengths of material ( ptéryges, wings), 150-180 cm wide and of varying length, sewn toget…

Recta

(107 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The first time the Roman boy donned the toga virilis, he wore the ( tunica) recta as an undergarment; for the sons of equestrians and senators, it was furnished with the insignia of rank ( latus clavus). The long, white tunica with tight upper sleeves which the Roman bride donned on the eve of her wedding, which she slept in and wore on her wedding day was called recta or regilla (Plin. HN 8,194). Clothing; Toga Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography Blümner, PrAlt., 336, 350 f.  C. M. Wilson, The Clothing of the Ancient Romans, 1938, 138-145  D. Balsdon, Die Frau in der röm…

Facial expression

(469 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] FE means the expressive motions of the entire face (moods) or parts of it that spontaneously indicate a momentary human mood or are deliberately assumed with the intention of making a particular expression. FE's are often situation-related and supplemented by  gestures ( Gestus) or even only become comprehensible through the latter. On the stage individual characters were shown with differing FE's ( Masks,  Mimos). FE's were also a means of providing a person (e.g. a philosopher, …

Palimpsest

(350 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (παλίμψηστος/ palímpsēstos [βίβλος/ bíblos or χάρτης/ chártēs], lat. codex rescriptus). A 're-scraped' book, papyrus or parchment leaf, prepared for renewed writing after its first text was scraped off. The first text was either wiped off with a sponge or scraped away with pumice stone. This method was already used in Egypt (e.g. PBerlin 3024, 12th dynasty, from c. 2000 BC), and was also standard practice in later periods, out of thrift (Cic. Fam. 7,18,2) or lack of virgin papyrus or parchment (cf. Catull. 22,5). Plutarch (Mor. 779c, 50…

Antyx

(109 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀντυξ; ántyx) Raised metal rim of the Greek shield (Hom. Il. 6,118; 15,645; 18,479 and passim); also refers to a hoop-like railing or ledge of the Greek racing and war chariot (archaic vase paintings [1.524 fig. 44]), which could be used to hold on to when stepping in or out (Hom. Il. 5,728 f.; 16,406). Evidently made of wood (Hom. Il. 21,38). When the chariot was not in motion, one could wrap the reins around the antyx (Hom. Il. 5,262). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 C. Weiss, M. Boss, Original und Restaurierung, in: AA 1992, 522-528. J. Wiesner, Fahren und Reit…

Mattress

(116 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τύλη/ týlē; Latin culcita, torus). Mattresses were laid on the Greek and Roman kline (lying on the supporting straps of the kline, Petron. Sat. 97,4) or were spread out directly on the floor (Ath. 15,675a; Alci. 4,13,14; χαμεύνη/ chameúnē: Theoc. 7,133; 13, 33). Mattresses were filled with wool, straw, reeds, sea grass, hay, hair, feathers; the feathers of Germanic geese being especially valued (Plin. HN 10,54, compare Ov. Met. 8,655 on rushes). There also was the κνέφαλλον/ knéphallon (Poll. 10,42) and the τυλεῖον/ tyleíon, the fine underbed made of wool cut a…

Crepundia

(88 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A piece of jewellery or a toy, usually metal, for small children in Rome. Besides the bulla ( Ages), children wore several such miniatures as an  amulet, strung on a chain and worn around the neck or over the shoulder. The crepundia were also used to identify abandoned children and were kept in a cistella (little chest) together with other children's items (Plaut. Cist. 634ff., Plaut. Rud. 1151ff.).  Amulet;  Jewellery Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography E. Schmidt, Spielzeug und Spiele im klass. Altertum, 1971, 18-21 incl. fig. 1.

Greeting

(1,186 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
I. Gestures of greeting [German version] A. Handshake According to Greek and Roman custom, one would shake the right hand of guests, family members, close acquaintances or friends and squeeze it firmly (Hom. Il. 10,542 et passim; Xen. Cyr. 3,2,14; Aristoph. Nub. 81; Plut. Cicero 879; Plut. Antonius 952; Plut. De amicorum multitudine 94b), both as a greeting (according to Plut. Caesar 708 more a form of affability) and to say good-bye. Shaking hands was seen as a sign of friendship and trust (Xen. Cyr. 3…

Canistrum

(110 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek κανοῦν; kanoûn). Flat wicker basket; it served as a fruit basket (Ov. Met. 8,675) and was used in agriculture (Verg. G. 4,280). Canistra of sturdy materials (clay, silver, gold) were used as receptacles for liquid substances, e.g. honey and oil. The canistrum was also a device for sacrifices (Tib. 1,10,27; Ov. Met. 2,713 and more); often represented in Roman art in this role, the canistrum contained incense, fruits and offering-cakes. The silver saucers for drinking vessels were called canistra siccaria (Serv. Aen. 1,706).  Kanoun Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bi…

Calceus

(275 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman shoe or half-boot made of leather that was probably adopted from the Etruscans and was part of the clothing ( vestis forensis) of the noble Roman citizen. If a member of the nobility dressed in other shoes in public, he would be criticized (Suet.Tib. 13; an exception was the dress for the banquet at which people wore the solla; Hor. Sat. 2,8,77; Mart. 3,50,3; Suet. Vit. 2). In Roman literature and art the calceus was represented in many ways; three variants can be distinguished that at the same time served to differentiate between social ranks. Th…

Geneleus

(237 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Sculptor of the archaic period, famous for the family group with his signature in the Heraion on  Samos (560-550 BC). The group consists of the reclining figure of the founder ...ιλάρχος, three standing girls (unknown name, Philippe, Ornithe), the fragments of a young man, and the enthroned mother Phileia; apart from Ornithe (Berlin, SM, Inv. 1739), all the figures are on Samos (Vathy, Mus. Inv. 768). G. proves himself a master of Ionian sculpture because of the minute detail to w…

Canosa Vases

(129 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Type of  Apulian vases, between c. 350 and 300 BC, probably made exclusively for use in graves. Their distinguishing feature is their decoration in a variety of water-soluble pigments (blue, red/pink, yellow, pale purple, brown) on a white background. Preferred  vessel forms are the volute-krater, cantharus, oinochoe, and askos, whose main bodies were frequently decorated with figures of women on small pedestals and with three-dimensional decor (winged heads, gorgoneia et al.). The gre…

Paestan ware

(394 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] PW first developed in around 360 BC when immigrant artists from Sicily founded a new workshop in the southern Italian city of Paestum (Poseidonia), the leading masters of which were the vase painters Asteas and Python. Both are the only vase painters in southern Italy whose signatures are known on vases. The Paestan vase painters favoured bell craters, neck amphorae, hydrias, lebetes gamikoi (nuptial cauldrons depicting mostly wedding but also funeral scenes), lekanides (cosmetic/trinket containers), lekythoi (one-handled flasks for perfumed oil) and jug…

Sakkos

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σάκκος/ sákkos). Closed bonnet, esp. popular as a headdress of Greek women in the 5th and 4th cents. BC. The evidence from Attic vase paintings and tomb reliefs shows the sákkos worn mainly by female servants, whereas in southern Italian art it appears as the headdress of any woman. Sákkoi frequently had a loop on the calotte for hanging them up and often tassels hanging down. Some sákkoi were unadorned or decorated with simple lines, while others were richly decorated with ornaments of meanders, waves, scrolls and similar. The sákkos was not necessarily the only hea…

Tiara

(266 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τιάρα/ tiára). Head covering of Near Eastern peoples (Armenians, Assyrians, Sagae, especially Persians; Hdt. 3,12; 7,61; 7,64 et passim), similar to a turban; also a tall tiara, decorated with stars and rising to a point, which among the Persians was fit only for the king, his relatives and holders of high office (Xen. An. 2,5,23; Xen. Cyr. 8,3,13). In Greek sources, the tiara is also called a kyrbasía or a kíd(t)aris (e.g. Aristoph. Av. 487). The tiara as a head covering for Middle Eastern aristocrats was also common in the Roman period (Suet. Ner…

Tribon

(99 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τρίβων/ tríbōn, τριβώνιον/ tribṓnion). A coat ( himátion, cf. pallium ) of 'bristly' wollen material, worn by Cretans (Str. 10,4,20) and Spartans (Plut. Lycurgus 30; Plut. Agesilaus 30; Ael. VH 7,13); later also common in Athens (Thuc. 1,6,3). It was part of the clothing of simple people (Aristoph. Eccl. 850; Aristoph. Vesp. 1131), farmers (Aristoph. Ach. 184; 343) and lakōnizóntes ('imitators of Spartan customs', Dem. Or. 54,34). From the time of Socrates (Pl. Symp. 219b; Pl. Prt. 335d; Xen. Mem. 1,6,2) the tribon was also the typ…

Tabula

(196 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] General Latin term for board (Plin. HN 31,128; 33,76; 36,114; Ov. Met. 11,428), then for 'game board' ( tabula lusoria, Games, Board games, Dice (game)), 'painted panel' ( tabula picta, Plin. HN 35,20-28), 'votive tablet' ( tabula votiva, Hor. Carm. 1,5,13; Pers. 6,33). In a special sense, tabula is the term for writing tablets, used for writing and calculating, of wood, whitewashed or with a layer of wax, or metal tablets (Writing materials, Codex ), as were already common among the Greeks. Tabulae were used in the public domain, e.g. as tablets of law ( Tabulae duodecim

Diphros

(118 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Four-legged stool, generally with turned legs. A seat for gods and heroes (west frieze of the Siphnian treasury in Delphi; east frieze of the  Parthenon), as well as for common people in scenes from everyday life (geometric amphora Athens, NM Inv. no. 804: workshop scenes). They were made of simple wood or valuable ebony, the inventory lists of the Parthenon even record silver-footed diphroi. A special form is the folding stool (διφρος ὀκλαδίας; díphros okladías), whose legs end in claw-shaped feet.  Furniture;  Sella curulis Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography G…

Darius Painter

(180 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Apulian vase painter working c. 340/320 BC, named after the main figure on the  Darius Crater. On the vessels he painted (including voluted craters, lutrophoroi, amphorae), some of which are monumental, he generally depicted scenes from classical tragedies (Euripides) and themes from Greek myth; some of these are only documented through his work. Other vases show scenes depicting weddings, women and Eros, as well as Dionysian motifs and rare sepulchral representations ( Naiskos vases). His tendency to name people and representations in inscriptions ( Persai, Pat…

Peniculus

(69 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also penicillum). Duster, a stick with the hairy end of an animal's tail (Paul Fest. 208; 231 M.); used to wipe down tables (Plaut. Men. 77f.), polish shoes (Plaut. ibid. 391) or clean agricultural implements and vessels (Columella 12,18,5). The peniculus was also used as a brush to whitewash walls (Plin. HN 28,235) and as a paintbrush (Plin. HN 35,60f.; 103; 149). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Subligaculum

(95 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Men's item of clothing to cover the abdomen (Varro, Ling. 6,21; Non. 29,17). Originally, it was probably worn under the Roman toga (Non. 29,17; Isid. Orig. 19,22,5) and was later replaced by the tunica . The subligar, on the other hand, is a cloth worn for special occasions, such as by actors (Juv. 6,70) and by women in the bath (Mart. 3,87,3), or generally by labourers (Plin. HN 12,59). Perizoma Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography M. Pausch, Neues zur Bekleidung im Mosaik der 'Bikini-Mädchen' von Piazza Armerina in Sizilien, in: Nikephoros 9, 1996, 171-173.

Petasos

(207 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πέτασος; pétasos). Greek hat made of felt with a wide brim, also referred to as a 'Thessalian hat' because of its origin (Soph. OC 313); it was worn by women and men who spent a lot of time outdoors (fishermen, herdsmen/women, hunters) or who were travelling; amongst the most best-known mythological petasos wearers were Hermes, Peleus, Perseus, Oedipus and Theseus. Additional wearers are - more rarely - chariot riders (Athen. 5,200f.), horsemen (e.g. on the Parthenon freeze) and the Attic ephebes ( ephēbeía ). The petasos was firmly retained by a strap that was p…

Mastruca

(66 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also mastruga). Sardian word (Quint. Inst. 1,5) for a close-fitting garment made of (sheep)skin, sleeveless and reaching down to the upper thighs. The Romans considered those who wore it to be uncivilised (Cic. Scaur. 45d; Cic. Prov. cons. 15), thus Alaricus in: Prud. in Symm. 1,659f. In Plaut. Poen. 1310-1313 it is also used as a term of abuse. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Brattea

(258 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πέταλον; pétalon). Ancient term uncommon in archaeological terminology; in Greek originally the ‘leaf or foliage of a tree’ (Hom. Il. 2,312; Od. 19,520), in Bacchyl. 5,186 the Olympian wreath of the wild olive, in the 2nd cent. BC at the latest considered to be the artificial metal leaves of a golden  wreath. In Roman sources brattea is used to describe a thin metal foil, mostly silver or gold for gilding objects, also veneers of precious wood (Plin. HN 16,232) or tortoiseshell (Mart. 9,59,9), but mostly gold leaf or gold foil is mea…

Household equipment

(1,622 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek τὰ ἔπιπλα/ tà épipla, ἡ σκευή/ hē skeuḗ; Latin supellex, instrumentum). Household equipment (HE) comprises the objects that are needed in daily life and that constitute the majority of moveable belongings; this includes primarily  furniture, cooking utensils and kitchen crockery, lighting devices,  carpets,  blankets, and in a wider sense also  jewellery and  clothing, furthermore, according to current understanding, objects belonging to the sphere of immovables, e.g. the doors and ro…

Matta

(84 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ψίαθος/ psíathos). Matte oder grobe Decke aus Binsen und Stroh, in Ägypten auch aus Papyrus (vgl. Theophr. h. plant. 4,8,4). Sie diente den Bauern, Reisenden und armen Leuten zum Lagern auf dem Boden; in einer att. Inschr. auch unter dem Hausmobilar aufgeführt [1]. Nach Augustinus (contra Faustum 5,5) ist jemand, der auf der M. schläft, ein Anhänger einer Lehre, die Bedürfnislosigkeit predigt ( mattarius). Die Schlafmatte konnte auch χαμεύνη/ chameúnē genannt werden (Poll. 6,11). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 Hesperia 5, 1936, 382 Nr. 6 A.

Pergament

(334 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Zu einem der Beschreibstoffe der Ant. zählte das gereinigte, enthaarte und gegerbte Leder (Hdt. 5,58,3). P. entstand durch eine verfeinerte Bearbeitung der Tierhaut (von Esel, Kalb, Schaf, Ziege), bei der auf die Gerbung verzichtet wurde; statt dessen legte man die Tierhaut einige Tage in eine Kalklösung, entfernte sodann Fleischreste, Haare und Oberhaut, und legte sie danach in ein Kalkbad zur Reinigung (Kalzinierung). Anschließend spannte man die Haut in einen Rahmen, trocknete…

Epiblema

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἐπίβλημα). Griech. Begriff für Decke, Tuch, Mantel (Poll. 7,49f.). In der modernen arch. Terminologie bezeichnet E. das Schultertuch der dädalischen, bes. der kretischen Frauenstatuetten. In der Regel wird das E. auf der Brust, aber auch über dem Hals und dem Schlüsselbein befestigt; der obere Rand ist mitunter verziert. Auf Denkmälern des 7. Jh.v.Chr. findet sich das E. häufig dargestellt. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Fer(i)culum

(131 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] seltener feretrum (z.B. Ov. met. 3,508; 14,747). Damit werden Tragevorrichtungen unterschiedlicher Form bezeichnet, die zum Befördern von Sachgütern nötig waren, speziell aber solche Gerüste, auf denen bei Aufzügen (Triumph, Bestattung o.ä.) Gegenstände präsentiert wurden, z.B. Beutestücke, Gefangene, Götterbilder u.a. (Suet. Caes. 76); ferner diente das f. zum Transport des Verstorbenen oder der Dinge, die mit ihm bestattet oder verbrannt werden sollten (Stat. Theb. 6,126). F. nannte man auch (Hausrat) das Speisebrett, die flache Schüssel, m…

Petasos

(180 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πέτασος). Griech. Hut aus Filz mit breiter Krempe, aufgrund seiner Herkunft auch als “thessalischer Hut” bezeichnet (Soph. Oid. K. 313); er wurde von Frauen und Männern getragen, die sich viel im Freien aufhielten (Fischer, Hirten, Jäger) oder auf Reisen waren; zu den bekanntesten myth. P.-Trägern zählen Hermes, Peleus, Perseus, Oidipus, Theseus. Weitere Träger sind - seltener - Wagenlenker (Athen. 5,200f.), Reiter (z.B. am Parthenonfries) und die att. Epheben ( ephēbeía ). Für einen sicheren Halt des p. sorgte ein Riemen, der unter das Kinn geführt wur…

Canosiner Vasen

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Gattung der apulischen Vasen, zwischen ca. 350 und 300 v.Chr. wohl ausschließlich für den Grabgebrauch hergestellt. Als ihr besonderes Kennzeichen kann die in wasserlöslichen, verschiedenen Farben (blau, rot/rosa, gelb, hellviolett, braun) ausgeführte Bemalung auf weißem Grund gelten. Bevorzugte Gefäßformen sind Volutenkrater, Kantharos, Oinochoe und Askos, deren Gefäßkörper häufig mit auf kleinen Podesten stehenden Frauenfiguren und plastischem Dekor (geflügelte Köpfe, Gorgoneia…

Bustum

(90 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Der bereits im Zwölftafelgesetz (Cic. leg. 2, 64) als “Grab” definierte Terminus war nach Paul. Fest. 6, 78; 25,3; 27,11 und Serv. Aen. 11,201 der Ort, an dem die Leiche verbrannt und die Reste bestattet wurden, während die Brandstätte allgemein ustrinum heißt. Arch. ist diese Bestattungsform vielfach belegt. Bestattung Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography T. Bechert, Röm. Germanien zwischen Rhein und Maas, 1982, 244-246  M. Struck(Hrsg.), Römerzeitliche Gräber als Quellen zu Rel., Bevölkerungsstruktur und Sozialgesch., 1993 (Arch. Schrift…

Geschicklichkeitsspiele

(488 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] wurden vor allem von Kindern veranstaltet. Bei einem Teil dieser Spiele dienten Astragale, Nüsse, kleine Steine, Münzen, kleine Kugeln oder Scherben als Spielzeug (Kinderspiel), bei anderen Stöcke, Scheiben, Räder usw. Beliebt war das πεντάλιθα ( pentálitha) genannte G. (Poll. 9,126), bei dem man fünf Steine (Nüsse, Kugeln o.ä.) hochwarf und mit der Handfläche oder dem Handrücken wieder auffing; bei einem anderen G., dem orca-Spiel, warf man in ein sich oben verengendes Gefäß Nüsse, Steine u.a. (Ps.-Ov. Nux 85f.; Pers. 3,50); diesem Spiel äh…

Armarium

(197 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (Schrank). Neben der arca das zweite wichtige Möbel zum Aufbewahren von Sachgütern. A. scheint ein typisch röm. Einrichtungsgegenstand gewesen zu sein, der den Griechen erst spät zur Kenntnis gelangte ( purgiskos). In seiner Grundfunktion bezeichnet A. den Geräteschrank, dann auch den Schrank für Speisen, Geld und Schmuck; auch die Bücherschränke bzw. -regale der Bibliotheken hießen A. Ein Grabrelief in Rom (TM 184) zeigt das A. in einer Schusterwerkstatt [3. 114-115 Taf. 117,1-2] bzw. als Einrichtungsgegenstand im Haushalt zusammen u.a. mit der arca (Leide…

Pallium

(240 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Ein dem griech. Himation entsprechender röm. Mantel aus einer rechteckigen Stoffbahn; als Materialien dienten Wolle, Leinen oder Seide. Das P. konnte unterschiedlich gefärbt (weiß, diverse Rottöne, gelblich, schwarz), golddurchwirkt und mit Purpurstreifen versehen sein. Es ist seit dem 3. Jh.v.Chr. bekannt, und anfänglich trugen es nur Freunde der griech. Kultur, Philosophen u.a. (Liv. 29,10); doch es erfreute sich recht bald aufgrund seiner Bequemheit und einfachen Tragweise grö…

Barbaron hyphasmata

(129 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (βαρβάρων ὑφάσματα). Als b.h. bezeichneten die Griechen die kostbaren medisch-persischen Gewänder, Stoffe, Decken u.a. mit bunten Ornamenten, detaillierten figürlichen Verzierungen, Misch- und Fabelwesen. Nach Griechenland gelangten b.h. durch Handel (Aristoph. Vesp. 1132ff.), als Beutegut (Hdt. 9,80) oder Geschenk (Athen. 2,48d). Als Weihung stiftete man b.h. in Heiligtümer (Paus. 5,12,4) oder man trug sie als Luxusgewänder zur Demonstration von Reichtum und Macht. Die b.h. führten zu Veränderungen der griech. Tracht (Zeira) und Textilien …

Bigae

(513 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Kurzform aus lat. biiugae (griech.: δίζυξ; συνωρίς); eigentlich zwei unter einem Joch gehende Tiere (Pferd, Rind, Maulesel), vornehmlich für Pferdegespanne verwandt. Neben den bereits aus der min.-myk. Kultur erh. Darstellungen auf Fresken, Sigelringen u.ä. bzw. den Modellen aus Ton oder Br., ist vor allem die lebendige Schilderung bei Homer (Il. 23,392f., Leichenspiele für Patroklos) eines Pferderennens im Zweigespann für die griech. Frühzeit zu erwähnen. Diese leichten Gespanne wu…

Akazie

(177 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἀκακία, Dioskurides 1,133; ἄκανθα, Theophr. h. plant. 6,1,3). Der bereits bei Hdt. 2,96 gen. ägypt. Schotendorn oder Gummibaum gehört zur im Mittelmeergebiet weit verbreiteten Gattung der Mimosengewächse. Der von dem Baum ausgeschwitzte Saft ( kommì, Gummi) fand bei den Ägyptern Verwendung bei der Einbalsamierung von Leichen (Hdt. 2,86), dann aber auch in der Humanmedizin (Augenheilkunde) und wurde in röm. Zeit teuer gehandelt (Plin. nat. 13,63). Den A.-saft verarbeitete man zu Mundpastillen (Plin. nat. 24,109) …

Acetabulum

(104 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Von lat. acetum (Essig); das kelchförmige Gefäß mit eingeschnürter Wandung diente zur Aufnahme von Essig und Honig, als Tisch- und Kochgefäß bzw. zum Wachsschmelzen; auch Becher der Taschenspieler. Das A. bestand meist aus Ton oder Glas, seltener aus Edelmetall. Sein Volumen war sehr gering (0,068 l [1]); bei Apicius (6,8,3) und Apici excerpta a Vindario VI ist A. auch ein Kochgefäß. catinus Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 F. Hultsch, s. v. A., RE I, 155 f. G. Hilgers, Lat. Gefäßnamen, BJ (Beih. 31), 1969, 33 f.  E. M. Stern, B. Schlick-Nolte, Frühes Glas d…

Kalathos

(276 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ὁ κάλαθος; Dim. τὸ καλάθιον/ kaláthion und ὁ/τὸ καλαθίσκος, -ν/ kalathískos/-n; lat. calathus). Sich blütenartig öffnender Korb aus unterschiedlichen Materialien wie Ton, Holz, Edelmetall (Hom. Od. 4,125), der auch aus Ruten geflochten sein kann [1]. Er diente als Arbeitskörbchen der Wollspinnerinnen (z.B. Iuv. 2,54; Ov. ars 1,693 und 2,219) - so ist er Requisit der Frauengemachszenen (z.B. Rhyton London, BM E 773 [2]) - oder im Haushalt als Behältnis für Käse, Milch oder Öl; daher konnte der K. ein typisches Hochzeitsgeschenk sein. Des weiteren war er ein Blumen- (Ov. met. 5,393 und 14…

Kekryphalos

(226 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κεκρύφαλος, -άλιον, lat. reticulum), Haarnetz, Haartuch. Bereits bei Hom. Il. 22,469 als Bestandteil der weiblichen Tracht erwähnt, diente der K. dazu, das Kopfhaar oder Teil…

Alveus

(125 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] [1] Behälter Muldenförmiger Behälter; eigentlich Höhlung, Wölbung oder Trog. Der A. diente als Keltertrog, Wanne für neugeborene Kinder und als Warmwasserwanne für eine oder mehrere Personen im Bad. Ferner kann A. auch einen Sarkophag meinen. In der arch. Forschung bezeichnet A. eine gemauerte, große Sitzwanne im Caldarium der röm. Thermen (die kleinere Variante wurde

Kredemnon

(168 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κρήδεμνον, lat. calautica, auch κάλυμνα/ kálymna, καλύπτρη/ kalýptrē). Allg. die oberste Bedeckung, auch eines Wein- oder Vorratsgefäßes (Hom. Od. 3,392) bzw. eines Mauerringes (Hom. Il. 16,100), dann aber mehr ein Kopftuch der Frauen, das die Schultern bedeckte und mit dem sie das Gesicht verhüllen konnten (Hom. Il. 14,184; 16,470; Hom. Od. 1,334). Im 5. Jh.v.Chr. nur noch poetisch verwendet (z.B. Eur. Phoen. 1490); die üblichen Ausdrücke für Schleier und speziell für Brautschleier waren kálymna und kalýptrē (vgl. Aischyl. Ag. 1178). Bereits auf den …

Askoliasmos

(132 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (Ἀσκωλιασμός). “Hüpfen auf einem Bein” (Plat. symp. 190d mit schol.; Aristoph. Plut. 1129 u.a.), auch “Schlauchhüpfen”. Von Eratosthenes (fr.22) und Didymos (schol. in Aristoph. ebd.) bei att. Kelterfesten als Tanzen auf einem Schlauch aus Schweins- oder Ziegenfell er…
▲   Back to top   ▲