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Simpuvium

(87 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ( simpulum, simpuium). Short-handled ladle of Roman priests and Vestal Virgins, usually of clay (Plin. HN 35,158); it was used to pour the wine needed for a  sacrifice (with ill.) on the sacrificial bowl. There are several representions of simpuvia on coins and in reliefs. In everyday life the simpuvium was replaced by the long-handled Greek kýathos (Varro Ling. 5,124). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography E. Zwierlein-Diehl, Simpuvium Numae, in: H. A. Cahn (ed.), Tainia. Festschrift R. Hampe 1980, 405-422 (with notes 58 and 69 on the form simpuium).

Phlyax vases

(191 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Even before the end of the 5th cent. BC, Greek vase painters had begun to depict grotesque comic scenes of the phlyakes' burlesques. The c. 250 extant vases and vase fragments show a rich repertoire of burlesques of the gods and heroes (e.g. Zeus and Hermes on an amorous adventure, Heracles at sacrifice), travesty of myth (Oedipus and the Sphinx) and daily life (punishment of a thief, love scenes, wedding). In Greece itself, PV are quite rare, although they are common in Apulian and Paestan vase painting…

Acacia

(187 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀκακία [ akakía], Dioscorides 1,133; ἄκανθα [ ákantha], Theophr. Hist. pl. 6,1,3). The Egyptian shittah or rubber tree, already mentioned in Hdt. 2,96, belongs to the genus of mimosa plants widespread in the Mediterranean. The sap ( kommì, gum) secreted by the tree was used by the Egyptians for embalming corpses (Hdt. 2,86), but then also in human medical applications (ophthalmology) and was traded at high prices in Roman times (Plin. HN 13,63). The acacia sap was processed into mouth pastilles (Plin. HN 24,109) for…

Hairstyle

(2,326 words)

Author(s): Colbow, Gudrun (Liege) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient In the Ancient Orient differences existed between male and female hairstyles as well as human and divine hairstyles. Ancient Oriental hairstyles were usually based on long hair. With the exception of goddesses who were portrayed en face with long curls, braided hairstyles were usually worn up to the 1st millennium. Men preferred knots and women braided crown styles. The form and size of knots and braided crowns were used to differentiate between gods and humans. Shaved heads as a special style were fr…

Blanket

(252 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek στρῶμα, strṓma; Lat. stragulum). Blankets were usually made of linen or wool, but also from the moleskin (Plin. HN 8, 226) and from furs ( Textile art). They were part of the  household equipment; owning many of them was a sign of wealth (Hom. Il. 16,224; Hom. Od. 3,348). Blankets were placed over the mattresses of the dining sofas and were used as cover during sleep (Hom. Il. 9,661; Hom. Od. 6,38; 11,189; 13,73). Blankets, like pillows and furs, were also placed on chairs. Sim…

Sponge

(311 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Science Σπόγγος/ spóngos, σπογγία/ spongía (Attic σπογγιά/ spongiá), Latin spongia (with the special names peniculus in comedies of such as Plautus and Terence, penicillus in Colum. 12,18,5 and Pliny) is the Bath Sponge ( Euspongia officinalis Bronn.), which grows in the Mediterranean. Four geographical subspecies, three black and one white (ἀπλυσία/ aplysía of the genus Sarcotragus Schmidt), are distinguished by Aristotle in his accurate description (Hist. an. 5,16,548a 30-549a 13; cf. Plin. HN 9,148-150) and a further one by Diosco…

Dice (game)

(530 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κυβεία/ kybeía; Lat. alea). Allegedly invented by the Lydians (Hdt. 1,94,3),  Palamedes [1] before Troy (Paus. 2,20,3; 10,31,1) or the Egyptian god Thot (Pl. Phdr. 274c-d). Dice are occasionally mentioned in mythology (Hdt. 2,122,1), e.g., Eros plays with Ganymede (Apoll. Rhod. 3,114-126), Hercules with a temple guard (Plut. Romulus 5,1 f.) and Patroclus with Clysonymus (Hom. Il. 23,87 f.). Either four-sided knuckle bones ( astragalos [2], Lat. also talus) that had inscribed on them the values one and six as well as three and four, or six-sided dice (κύβοι/ kýboi;…

Paenula

(233 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman cape of different lengths, produced from a semi-circular cut. It was sewn together at the front, had an opening for the head to slip in and a sewn-on hood. If required, the seam at the front could be unpicked from the bottom end in order to give the arms more room to move. The paenula was made of leather, linen or (sheep's) wool and was worn by men and women of all classes, slaves and soldiers, in particular as a travelling and bad-weather coat for protection against the cold and rain; it was white or gray, or dyed in various sh…

Tettix

(214 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(Τέττιξ, lit. “cicada”). [German version] [1] Founder of a city at the entrance to Hades A Cretan said to have founded a city on the Taenarum near the supposed entrance to Hades: there the man who killed Archilochus in battle, Callondas, nicknamed Corax, was sent by Delphi to placate Archilochus' ghost (Plut. De sera 17.615E, whence Suda α 4112, probably via Ael. (fr. 80)). The hypothesis of [1] that Archilochus called himself T. remains unproven, in spite of Lucian, Pseudol. 1 and Archil. fr. 223  West. Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) Bibliography 1 Göber, s. v. T. (1), RE 5 A, 1111. [German version] [2…

Salutatio

(446 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ('Greeting'). The morning reception allowed clients ( cliens, clientes ) to pay their respects to their patronus , and to receive advice (Hor. Epist. 2,1,102) and support, e.g. money ( sportula ). It took place during the first two hours of the morning (Mart. 4,8); the client ( salutator) had to attend in toga (Juv. 3,126 f.); hence Martial (3,46,1) calls the clients' duties the togata opera. The visitors gathered in the vestibulum or atrium of the house of their patronus and awaited admission (Hor. Epist. 1,5,31). Friends and prominent individuals were grant…

Money boxes

(209 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀργυροθήκη/ argyrothḗkē; Latin arcula, crumena). It seems that MB were unknown in archaic and classical Greece; money was kept in trunks and chests together with jewellery and other objects of value (e.g. Theophr. Char. 10). Probably the oldest surviving MB is from Priene (2nd/1st cent. BC) and has the form of a little temple with a slit in the pediment for inserting money, which can be taken out again through a lockable opening at the rear [1. 190 f. no. 25]. The Romans used small pots for keeping money ( olla or aula, Cic. Fam. 9,18,4, cf. also Plautus's comedy Aulularia).…

Dolls

(293 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κόρη/ kórē, νύμφη/ nýmphē; Lat. pup[ p] a) were made in antiquity from wood, bone, wax, cloth, clay, precious metals and the like and have been preserved in very large quantities from the early Bronze Age until the end of antiquity. We know of dolls in human as well as animal shape (Gell. NA 10,12,9) and of toys like e.g. items of furniture (beds, tables, chairs) and household objects (crockery, combs, lamps, mirrors, thymiaterion etc.). Human dolls were fitted out with great care. The …

Coae Vestes

(160 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Luxury  clothing from the island of Cos, with a transparent effect. They were known as early as Aristotle (Hist. an. 5,19; cf. Plin. HN 4,62) and received special mention during the Roman Imperial period.They were regarded as luxury clothing for demi-mondaines (e.g. Hor. Sat. 1,2,101; Tib. 2,3,57) but were also worn by men as light summer clothing. The sheen, purple colouring and decoration in gold thread, i.a. were highly esteemed. The fabric was woven from the raw silk of the bombyx ( Silk,  Butterfly), whose cocoons produced only short thread…

Parchment

(379 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Cleaned, depilated and tanned leather was one of the writing materials of Antiquity (Hdt. 5,58,3). Parchment emerged from a refined treatment of animal skin (donkey, calf, sheep, goat), which did not include tanning. Instead, the skin was soaked in a solution of slaked lime (calcium carbonate) for several days, then any remains of flesh, hair and epidermis were scraped off, and the skin was again soaked in a vat of lime for cleansing (calcination). The skin was then stretched over…

Ostrakinda

(162 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὀστρακίνδα/ ostrakínda). The 'shard game' or 'day and night game', a running and catching game played by Greek boys: of two groups with an equal number of players, one group stands facing east (day) and the other west (night) on a line over which a player throws a shard (ὄστρακον, óstrakon) that is painted white on one side = day (ἡμέρα, hēméra) and black on the other = night (νύξ, nýx); as he does so, the thrower calls 'day or night'. If the disc falls on the black side, the members of the west team attempt to catch the east team who are running a…

Ceremonial dress

(491 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Wearing the ceremonial dress (CD) distinguished persons in society and identified them in their official roles. This holds true particularly for priestesses, state officials, but also for delegates (herald's staff) and others. In Greece, priests wore a white robe (Pl. Leg. 12,965a), the ungirded  chiton, which could also be red, or, less often, dyed with saffron or purple. Another characteristic was the  wreath ( stephanophóroi, ‘wearers of the wreath’, was thus the name of priests in e.g. Miletus); less commonly, priests displayed the attribu…

Loculi

(185 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also lucellus). Loculi refer to boxes of different size that are divided into several compartments, such as caskets, cabinets, coffers etc. The loculi were used to hold the counting stones ( calculi) of students for class as well as to store jewellery or money (Hor. Sat. 1,3,17; 2,3,146; Frontin. Aq. 118); for the latter use, one could even carry them around as a purse (Juv. 11,38; Mart. 14,12f., cf. Petron. Sat. 140); holding spaces for any kind of animal in agriculture could also be referred to as loculi, as could the urns for voting. In the funerary practices, loculus desi…

Delphica

(70 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The round decorative table on three legs ( Household equipment;  Furniture) was called delphica by the Romans in imitation of the Delphic tripod (Procop. Vand. 1,21). The delphicae mentioned in literature (Mart. 12,66f.; Cic. Verr. 2,4,131) are probably to be identified with surviving tables from, in particular, the cities around Vesuvius. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography G. M. A. Richter, The Furniture of the Greeks, Etruscans and Romans, 1966, 111-112.

Xenon group

(245 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A special group of South Italian vases, named after a label on a pot in Frankfurt with the charioteer Xenon preparing to start [1]. The decoration of XG vases was applied with red slip to a pot covered with dark glaze (Gnathia ware). The pots (Pottery) used are quite small in scale. Decoration is chiefly limited to ornamentation (Ornaments) such as ivy and laurel branches, rod ornaments, wavy lines, meanders etc.; in contrast, representations of animals or people are distinctly ra…

Cradle

(193 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λίκνον/ líknon, σκάφη/ skáphē; Lat. cunae, cunabula, n. pl.). The líknon, actually the ‘grain rocker’, was used as a cradle (H. Hom. 4,150; 254; 290; 358; [1. 298, fig. 285]; cf. Callim. H. 1,48). A container similar to a tub served as a second form of the cradle (Soph. TrGF IV, 385; Ath. 13,606f; 607a;   scáphē ). There were often notches or small struts on the frame of the cradle for attaching cords. Safety belts could be drawn crosswise over the cradle. From time to time two children could be accommodated in them (Plut. Romulus 3,4). Depictions of infants in skáphai are know…

Ephedrismos

(156 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἐφεδρισμός; ephedrismós). A game where a target (δίορος; díoros) on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball; the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Boys and girls participated in ephedrismos, which according to the evidence of monuments became popular in the 5th cent. BC and is depicted in various stages. The representations also show satyrs and Erotes playing ephedrismos. The piggyback motif is very widespread in the Greek and Roman art (intaglios, sculpture; group in Ro…

Situla

(484 words)

Author(s): Kohler, Christoph (Bad Krozingen) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Italic, Celtic and Germanic Bucket-shaped vessel, as a rule metal, for the carrying and short-term holding of liquids. The shape is generally conical, with flat shoulders and a wide opening, on which a carrying handle was often also fixed with eyelets. The bottom, body and rim were mostly fashioned separately, then riveted together. In Etruria situlae are recorded from the 9th cent. BC onwards and were widely distributed there from the Orientalising Period on. Situlae had far greate…

Kemos

(92 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κημός; kēmós, late Ancient Greek χάμος; chámos; Lat. c[h]amus, -um). Kemoi cover a variety of objects that apparently relate to the basic concept of wrapping, covering, etc. Part of these are nosebags for horses, from which they take their fodder (Hesych. s.v.), as well as bow nets for fish, and the type of cloth that bakers tied around their mouth and nose (Ath. 12,548c) and that women wore in public to cover the lower part of their face. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. Schenkl, s.v. K., RE 11, 157-162.

Alveus

(128 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Trough-shaped container; actually cavity, vault or trough. The alveus served as wine press trough, bath for newborn children and as hot-water bath tub for one or more persons. Moreover, alveus can also mean a sarcophagus. In archaeological research alveus designates a large hip bath built in stone or brick, in the caldarium of the Roman thermae [1] (the smaller versions were called alveolus), which were heated by the praefurnium above the testudo alvei, a semicircular kettle. Functionally allied with the alveus are solium and   labrum . Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bi…

Trabea

(230 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Schmidt, Peter Lebrecht
[German version] [1] Festal form of the toga Roman garment, a festal form of the toga , differing from it only in colour. It was dyed purple-red, with scarlet or white stripes ( clavi) and was worn on official occasion by equestrians and Salii [2]. Originally it was the dress of Roman kings and was then taken over by consuls, but they wore it only on special occasions (e.g. opening of the Temple of Janus). Other wearers of the trabea in the early period were the augures and the Flamines Dialis and Martialis (priests of Jupiter and Mars), who then wore the toga praetexta from the 3rd cent. BC onw…

Swaddling Clothes

(139 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σπάργανον/ spárganon; Latin incunabula). SC in their modern form were not known in Antiquity; instead, a baby would be wrapped entirely - apart from the head - with narrow strips of wool. Wrapping was supposed to ensure the striaght growth of the body and the limbs (Sen. Ben. 6,24,1,  cf. Plin. HN 7,3). In Thessaly only the lower half of the body was wrapped, in Sparta SC were dispensed with entirely (Plut. Lycurgus 16,3). Depictions of babies survive from the Bronze Age onwards (e.…

Lakonikai

(64 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λακωνικαί; lakōnikaí). Men's shoes or boots, similar to the embas ( Shoes). Originally a Lacedaemonian (Spartan) phenomenon (Aristoph. Vesp. 1158-1165), later also worn elsewhere (Aristoph. Eccl. 74; 269; 345; 507, Aristoph. Thesm. 142); the elegant lakonikai were white (Ath. 215c) and red (Poll. 7,88). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography O. Lau, Schuster und Schusterhandwerk in der griech.-röm. Lit. und Kunst, 1967, 126f.

Orarium

(138 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also called sudarium). The use of a 'face-cloth' ( orarium) or 'sweat-cloth' ( sudarium) is attested from the 1st cent. BC (Quint. Inst. 6,3,60; 11,3,148); it was used to wipe away sweat, cover the mouth (Suet. Nero 25), cover the head (Suet. Nero 45) or dry the hands (Petron. 67). It could also be worn around the neck (Suet. Nero 51; Petron. 67). According to Catull. 12,14 and 25,7, sudaria were made of Spanish linen. The name orarium does not emerge until the 3rd cent. AD; the two were used synonymously, with the orarium now being used for applause in arenas, for cover…

Plaga

(227 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Roman hunting net Roman hunting net, esp. for entrapment, into which game (stags, boars) was flushed from cover by dogs (Hor. Epod. 2,31-32; Hor. Epist. 1,6,58; 1,18,45), and so contrasts with the retia ('strike nets') and casses ('drop or purse nets'); of plagae plaited from rope, those from Cumae were the most highly valued (Plin. HN 19,11). The battue with the plaga, depicted in ancient art from early times (Vaphio Cup), later became primarily a theme of Roman mosaic and sarcophagus art. The term plaga is no longer used in modern archaeological scholarship, …

Pilos

(175 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (πῖλος/ pîlos). Originally the term for the felt lining of helmets (Hom. Il. 10,265), shoes and caps (Hes. Op. 542-546) and the protective part of the armour (Thuc. 4,34,4), later for felt blankets (Hdt. 4,73 and 75) and shoes of felt (Cratinus 100 CAF), but esp. for a conical headdress (Hes. Op. 546, Anth. Pal. 6,90 and 199, cf. Hdt. 3,12; 7,61; 62; 92 on the felt mitres and tiaras of eastern peoples). The last resembles half an egg (Lycoph. 506), at times with a loop on the point for hanging up or carrying by the finger. The pîlos was worn by craftsmen (in pictorial represen…

Neck ornaments

(655 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A. Greece Neck ornaments famously play a role in the myth of Eriphyle, as they do in that of Scylla (Aesch. Choe. 613-622). The comedy Plókion by Menander also deserves mention (cf. Plut. Mor. 2,141d; Gell. 2,23,6). In Aristaen. 1,1 the stones of the necklace are organised in such a way that they give the name of Lais. Neck ornaments (ἁλύσιον/ halúsion, κάθημα/ káthēma, μάννος/ mánnos, μανιάκης/ maniákēs, ὅρμος/ hormos, πλόκιον/ plókoin) as a chain or a rope, with and without pendants, have survived in great numbers throughout the Mediterranean since…

Kekryphalos

(246 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κεκρύφαλος, -άλιον; kekrýphalos, -álion, Lat. reticulum), hair net, hair cloth. Mentioned already in Hom. Il. 22,469 as part of the female costume, the kekryphalos was used to cover the hair or parts thereof. Greek (cf. e.g. Aristoph. Thesm. 257) and Roman women wore a kekryphalos not only at night to keep their carefully arranged hairstyle together, but also during the day (Varro, Ling. 130; Non. 14,32 et al.). Men who occasionally were seen to wear a kekryphalos were criticized (Ath. 15,681c; Juv. 2,96) and perceived as effeminate. As a cloth, the kekryphalos could b…

Paludamentum

(262 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Rectangularly cut, mostly purple but also red or white, Roman cloak of linen or wool, corresponding to the Greek chlamys; Agrippina's gold-braided paludamentum is, however, unusual (Plin. HN. 33,63). Initially paludamenta were worn only by Roman generals and other high-ranking officers; they advanced in the imperial period to insignia of Imperial ruling power. Paludamenta were part of the battle dress of generals and emperors (cf. Varro Ling. 7,37) and were not to be worn within the limits of the city of Rome (Tac. Hist. 2,89); thu…

Fimbriae

(153 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κροσσοί/ krossoí; θύσανοι/ thýsanoi). These were actually the thread ends left at the edge of the cloth that ─ with several knotted together or hanging individually ─ decorated materials of all kinds such as cloths, blankets and clothes. They could also be worked separately and sewed on. Thus, for example, the ταραντῖνον ( tarantînon), a luxury garment, or the rica, a Roman head scarf, are explicitly defined as trimmed with fimbriae (Fest. 288,10; Non. 549,9). The Oriental and Egyptian garments already show evidence of fimbriae; they are also documented in Greek…

Trigon

(122 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman ball game, recorded for the Imperial period; it was played on the Field of Mars  (Hor. Sat. 1,6,126) and in baths (Petron. 27,1-3). Three players (Mart. 7,72,9) were needed for trigon; they positioned themselves in a triangle and played one or more small balls between themselves, either catching them (Mart. 12,82,4) or hitting them with both hands so that they were passed back to the thrower or to the third player (Mart. 14,46,1), sometimes with such violence that the palms …

Applause

(607 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (κρότος, ἐπικροτεῖν [ krótos, epikroteîn], plausus, plaudere). The impulsive and impromptu expression of praise and approval, also of rejection, cursing and reprimand communicated through words, sounds, gestures and actions; these forms of expressing approval are so closely related to   acclamatio that it is often difficult to distinguish between them [1]. In the ancient world, the most frequent gesture used to express approval was the clapping of hands, for example, in the theatre, during music, danc…

Kalathos

(323 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὁ κάλαθος/ ho kálathos; diminutive τὸ καλάθιον/ tò kaláthion and ὁ/τὸ καλαθίσκος, -ν/ ho/tó kalathiskos, -n; Lat. calathus). A basket which opens like a blossom, made from a variety of materials such as clay, wood, precious metals (Hom. Od. 4,125). It can also be woven from rods [1]. It was used as a working basket by female wool spinners (e.g. Juv. 2,54; Ov. Ars am. 1,693 and 2,219) - and as such is a requisite of scenes of the women's quarters (e.g. Rhyton London, BM E 773 [2]) - or as a household receptacle for cheese, milk, or oil, which made the kalathos a common wedding pre…

Strophium

(208 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
(στρόφιον/ stróphion). A band wound round something or twisted together. [German version] [1] Breast band A breast band worn by women in Greece and Rome (Aristoph. Thesm. 139; 251; 255; 638; Aristoph. Lys. 931; Catull. 64,65), also called μίτρα/ mítra (Anth. Pal. 5,13,4; Apoll. Rhod. 3,867), μηλοῦχος/ mēloûchos (Anth. Pal. 6,211), στηθόδεσμος/ stēthódesmos (Poll. 7,66), mamillare (Mart. 14,66 lem.), fascia pectoralis (Mart. 14,134 Lem., cf. Ov. Ars am. 3,274; Prop. 4,9,49). Women are variously portrayed in art wearing strophia or putting on strophia. Straps across the shoulde…

Umbrella, Parasol

(241 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (σκιάδιον/ skiádion or σκιάδειον/ skiádeion; Latin umbella, umbraculum). Round, collapsible umbrellas and those with fixed frames had been familiar to the Greeks from the 5th cent. BC; as in the states of the Near East, in Greece too umbrellas were a status symbol and sign of dignity. Noble Greek women had them carried by a servant girl (Athen. 12,534a, cf. Ael. VH 6,1). For Greek men, carrying an umbrella was considered a sign of effeminacy (Pherecrates PCG 7, 70 (64)). In Antiquity, um…

Lakaina

(116 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λάκαινα; lákaina). A drinking vessel listed as a cup in Ath. 11,484f.; the technical term is used in archaeological research to describe a vessel with a goblet-like body and round-bellied lower part, with two horizontal handles. Produced predominantly in Sparta from the 8th cent. BC onwards, the L. became a model for Laconian vasepainting of the 7th cent. BC. The design was discontinued after the middle of the 6th cent. BC. Its decoration was usually ornamental, but black- glazed examples do occur. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. M. Stibbe, Lakon. Vasenma…

Chests

(267 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ζύγαστρον/ zýgastron, κιβωτός/ kibōtós, κιβώτιον/ kibṓtion, λάρναχ/ lárnax, χηλός/ chēlós; Latin arca, cista). Chests made of wood, bronze or other materials were used in the household for storing and transporting clothes, household goods, book rolls (  scrinium), equipment, provisions, etc. Chests could be simple and undecorated, or decorated with ornamental or figurative reliefs on their sides ( Praenestine cistae). Wooden chests often had metal fittings, which were also decorated, for reinforcing edges and corne…

Games

(1,734 words)

Author(s): Nissen | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Egypt and Ancient Orient The boundaries between games and  sport are fluid; here only relaxation games ( Board games) are treated that are very well known e.g. for Egypt as originals from tomb contexts and pictorial representations e.g. the Senet board game ( znt) was popular. The position regarding the sources for the Ancient Orient is very limited for climatic reasons (wood barely preserved). We can make only assumptions about the rules of games. In addition to the game boards there are game stones, astragaloi ( Astragalos [2]), dice and little dice rods tha…

Sportula

(118 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ( sporta, sportella). Roman basket (Isid. Orig. 20,9,10; Petron. Sat. 40) used for shopping (Apul. Met. 1,24 and 25), the term is also used for a  basket which held money or food for clients (Petron. 40;  Juv. 1,95 f.; Salutatio ). Hence sportula denoted a feeding of the public (cf. Suet. Claudius 21,4) or a fee due to the magistrates for their official activities. In the 4th and 5th cents. AD, the fees that were charged by court magistrates for their services were also called sportula (Cod. Iust. 3,2). Donativum Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. A. Cahn et al., …

Catinus

(154 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Dish of clay or metal for meals Dish of clay or metal for meals (fish, meat, desserts). Vessel for the kitchen and cooking, for sacrificial offerings and for melting metals; identified by graffiti probably as the vessel forms Dragendorff 31 and 32 ( Clay vessels). Bowls (  acetabulum ) were also called catinus.  Terra sigillata;  Clay vessels Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography G. Hilgers, Lat. names of vessels, BJ 31. Supplement 1969, 48f., 142-144 F. Fless, Opferdiener und Kultmusiker auf stadtröm. histor. Reliefs, 1995, 19f. [German version] [2] Meltin…

Shoes

(752 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] According to ancient literature (Poll. 5,18; 7,85-94; 10,49; Herodas 7,54 ff.), there was a great multiplicity of varieties of sandals and boots; only in a small number of cases is it possible to identify footwear mentioned by name with that represented in monumental art or with surviving originals (e.g. calceus ). From Classical Greece alone we have 82 words for footwear, named after origin, people, shape, colour, material or use: many kinds of footwear were adopted from other countries and given the name of their country of origin, e.g. 'Persian shoes', Περσικαί/ Pe…

Darius Crater

(159 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Apulian voluted crater from  Canosa (found in 1851) in Naples (NM, Inv. 81947 [H 3,253], H 130cm, [1]), known as the eponymous work of the  Darius Painter named after it. The main face has the crown council of Darius in the centre [1] I., with paymasters and tribute bearers below and Athena with Hellas before Zeus and Apate before Asia above. Archaeological study interprets this as a representation of the victories of  Alexander' [4] the Great in Persia or an echo of contemporary …

Wig

(282 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (φενάκη/ phenákē, πηνήκη/ pēnḗkē, Latin capillamentum, galerus). The use of wigs apparently began in Greece at the end of the 6th cent. BC; late Archaic korai show hairstyles that are inconceivable without added hairpieces. In the theatre, too, people made use of wigs in the 5th cent. BC (Aristoph. Thesm. 258) and also used false beards (Aristoph. Eccl.25), musicians and conjurers similarly wore wigs and hairpieces (Ael. VH 1,26; Lucian Alexandros 3). The use of wigs and hairpieces was extremely popular i…

Wineskin

(173 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀσκός/ askós; Lat. culleus, uter). For transporting solid (Thuc. 4,26) and liquid foods (Hom. Il. 3,247; Hom. Od. 5,265; 9,196), apart from barrels, people also used animal (ox, sheep, goat; in the Arab lands also camel, Hdt. 3,9) skins sewn together, a leg of the animal serving as inlet and outlet. Representations of wineskins are common in ancient art in transportation scenes; a wineskin-carrying silen is a fixed feature of the iconography of Dionysian scenes (Dionysus). In myths, …

Epiblema

(76 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἐπίβλημα; epíblēma). Greek term for  blanket, cloth, coat (Poll. 7,49f.). In modern-day archaeological terminology, epiblema denotes the shoulder-covering of Daedalic female statues, esp. those from Crete. As a rule the epiblema is fastened at the breast, but also across the neck and collarbone; the upper edge is occasionally decorated. The epiblema is frequently depicted on 7th-cent. BC monuments. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Mortar

(231 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ὅλμος/ hólmos, ἴγδις/ ígdis, θύεια/ thýeia, ὕπερον/ hýperon, Latin mortarium, pistillum, pila). Mortars and pestles of various materials were among the household utensils (Plaut. Aul. 94-95; Household equipment) necessary for kneading dough, grinding corn, chopping and mixing fruits, vegetables, etc. Mortars were also used for preparing cosmetics and drugs, pigments and metal alloys. Mortars included smaller grinding bowls (with or without a lip and round grinding stone, called a coticula in Latin, Plin. HN 34,106; made of granite for eye ointment…

Arca

(216 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λάρναξ; lárnax). Box, case, chest, then especially the treasure chest of wood or metal-jointed wood in the atrium (Juv. 11,26; 14,259 and passim), of which there are known examples or remains of examples in Pompeii. Arca was the term used for a large number of sacred, state and private treasures, e.g. the one of the virgines vestales. The arca could be large enough for a person to hide inside (App. B Civ. 4,44). Small arcae are preserved from late antiquity which were given to one's wife as a present with congratulatory messages and their metal fitting…

Dipylon Painter

(303 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Attic vase painter of the geometric period (Late Geometric I, mid 8th cent. BC;  Geometric vase painting), named after the cemetery at the Dipylon Gate in Athens, where most of his works were found. The Dipylon Painter (DP) and the other painters of his workshop created about 20 monumental vases (kraters; amphorae), which were placed on tombs as receptacles for offerings ( Burial); of these, the amphora Athens, NM 804, with a height of 155 cm (the stand has been replaced and thus …

Solium

(184 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Seat Roman high seat with foot-, arm- and backrest, throne; the solium was the seat of kings (Ov. Fast. 3,358; 6,353) and, presumably as early as in Etruria, the symbolic seat of a pater familias . It was inherited from father to son, selling it was considered shameful ( Salutatio ). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography F. Prayon, Frühetrurische Grab- und Hausarchitektur, 1975, 111 f.  Th. Schäfer, Imperii Insignia. Sella curulis und Fasces. 29. Ergänzungsheft MDAI(R), 1989, 26 f. [German version] [2] Bathtub Roman bathtub for one (Mart. 2,42; Vitr. 9 …

Clavus

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] ‘Nail’, in the context of  clothing: ‘stripes’. The decoration of a  tunic with purple clavi extending from the shoulder to the lower seam at the front and back, served to denote rank in Rome. Senators, their sons (since Augustus) and officials wore a tunic with broad stripes ( lati clavi), equestrians one with small stripes ( angusti clavi). The clavi could be woven in or sewn on, cf.  Dalmatica. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. R. Goette, Studien zu röm. Togadarstellungen, 1990, 8-9 J. Bergemann, Röm. Reiterstatuen, 1990, 23-24 B. Levick, A Note on the …

Calenian Pottery

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Generic term for lower Italian black-glazed pottery ( Relief ware), evident from the second half of the 4th cent. to the 2nd cent. BC. The term Calenian Pottery (CP) (askoi, bowls, omphalos phialae, gutti) is commonly used for this group of vessels, yet they were undoubtedly also produced in other regions (Paestum, Sicily, Tarentum). Particularly well-known are bowls with medallions, worked in a medium relief (‘Arethusa bowls’); their origin from Cales (Calenus) or rather Campania…

Nestoris

(182 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A type of ‘Italian’ vase, also called trozella, which was adopted by Lucanian vase painting in the 5th cent. and by Apulian vase painting only around the middle of the 4th cent. BC. The nestoris appears to have been taken on from Messapian vase art. It is known in various forms; typical is its ovoid body with side handles and strap handles (which rise up from the shoulder of the vessel and connect to its lip) which are often decorated with discs (rotellae) [1. 11 fig. 3]. In vase …

Pilleus

(212 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (also pileus). Close-fitting half-spherical or ball-shaped head covering made of fur, felt, leather or wool; adopted by the Romans from the Etruscans (cf. Liv. 34,7). In Rome the pilleus was the mark of a free citizen and was given a slave (Petron. Sat. 41), prisoner of war, or gladiator (Tert. De spectaculis 21) upon manumission. Thus the pilleus libertatis, together with the vindicta , is the attribute of Libertas, who holds them in her hands on Roman coins. P illeus can be used synonymously as an expression for freedom (Mart. 2,68; Suet. Nero 57, cf. Plau…

Furniture

(1,500 words)

Author(s): Cholidis, Nadja (Berlin) | Veigel, Isabell (Berlin) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient Furniture can be documented for the Ancient Orient since the 6th millennium BC, in the form of a sculpture of a feminine figure from Çatal Hüyük that is enthroned on a chair flanked by felines. More substantial statements, however, are not possible until the 3rd millennium BC, as written sources are added. Of the furniture made mostly of wood, reed, woven textiles or leather, scarcely anything is preserved due to the aggressive climate in the Near East. Valuable ind…

Chiton

(507 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (χιτών; chitón). Greek undergarment, originally of linen, then wool; probably of Semitic origin ( Clothing). Frequent occurrences in Homer (e.g. Il. 2,42; 262; 416; 3,359; Od. 14,72; 19,242), show that the chiton was already a part of Greek costume in early times, and a favoured garment for men. The chiton came into fashion for women during the 1st half of the 6th cent. BC, and later replaced the  peplos (vase paintings, sculptures). The chiton consists of two rectangular lengths of material ( ptéryges, wings), 150-180 cm wide and of varying length, sewn toget…

Recta

(107 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The first time the Roman boy donned the toga virilis, he wore the ( tunica) recta as an undergarment; for the sons of equestrians and senators, it was furnished with the insignia of rank ( latus clavus). The long, white tunica with tight upper sleeves which the Roman bride donned on the eve of her wedding, which she slept in and wore on her wedding day was called recta or regilla (Plin. HN 8,194). Clothing; Toga Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography Blümner, PrAlt., 336, 350 f.  C. M. Wilson, The Clothing of the Ancient Romans, 1938, 138-145  D. Balsdon, Die Frau in der röm…

Facial expression

(469 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] FE means the expressive motions of the entire face (moods) or parts of it that spontaneously indicate a momentary human mood or are deliberately assumed with the intention of making a particular expression. FE's are often situation-related and supplemented by  gestures ( Gestus) or even only become comprehensible through the latter. On the stage individual characters were shown with differing FE's ( Masks,  Mimos). FE's were also a means of providing a person (e.g. a philosopher, …

Palimpsest

(350 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (παλίμψηστος/ palímpsēstos [βίβλος/ bíblos or χάρτης/ chártēs], lat. codex rescriptus). A 're-scraped' book, papyrus or parchment leaf, prepared for renewed writing after its first text was scraped off. The first text was either wiped off with a sponge or scraped away with pumice stone. This method was already used in Egypt (e.g. PBerlin 3024, 12th dynasty, from c. 2000 BC), and was also standard practice in later periods, out of thrift (Cic. Fam. 7,18,2) or lack of virgin papyrus or parchment (cf. Catull. 22,5). Plutarch (Mor. 779c, 50…

Ofellius

(378 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
Roman family name (also Offellius, Offillius etc.), probably from the Oscan praenomen Of(f)ellus, which also appears as a cognomen (a landowner in Venusia: Hor. Sat. 2,2,2f.; 53f.; 112ff.). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [1] O. Tribunus militum, 36 BC Tribunus militum in 36 BC, mocked rewards handed out by Octavian (Augustus) as paltry, whereupon according to Appian he vanished without trace (App. B Civ. 5,532f.). Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) [German version] [2] O., A. Roman jurist Jurist, see Ofilius Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2a] O. Ferus, C. Campanian …

Antyx

(109 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀντυξ; ántyx) Raised metal rim of the Greek shield (Hom. Il. 6,118; 15,645; 18,479 and passim); also refers to a hoop-like railing or ledge of the Greek racing and war chariot (archaic vase paintings [1.524 fig. 44]), which could be used to hold on to when stepping in or out (Hom. Il. 5,728 f.; 16,406). Evidently made of wood (Hom. Il. 21,38). When the chariot was not in motion, one could wrap the reins around the antyx (Hom. Il. 5,262). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 C. Weiss, M. Boss, Original und Restaurierung, in: AA 1992, 522-528. J. Wiesner, Fahren und Reit…

Mattress

(116 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (τύλη/ týlē; Latin culcita, torus). Mattresses were laid on the Greek and Roman kline (lying on the supporting straps of the kline, Petron. Sat. 97,4) or were spread out directly on the floor (Ath. 15,675a; Alci. 4,13,14; χαμεύνη/ chameúnē: Theoc. 7,133; 13, 33). Mattresses were filled with wool, straw, reeds, sea grass, hay, hair, feathers; the feathers of Germanic geese being especially valued (Plin. HN 10,54, compare Ov. Met. 8,655 on rushes). There also was the κνέφαλλον/ knéphallon (Poll. 10,42) and the τυλεῖον/ tyleíon, the fine underbed made of wool cut a…

Crepundia

(88 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A piece of jewellery or a toy, usually metal, for small children in Rome. Besides the bulla ( Ages), children wore several such miniatures as an  amulet, strung on a chain and worn around the neck or over the shoulder. The crepundia were also used to identify abandoned children and were kept in a cistella (little chest) together with other children's items (Plaut. Cist. 634ff., Plaut. Rud. 1151ff.).  Amulet;  Jewellery Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography E. Schmidt, Spielzeug und Spiele im klass. Altertum, 1971, 18-21 incl. fig. 1.

Greeting

(1,186 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
I. Gestures of greeting [German version] A. Handshake According to Greek and Roman custom, one would shake the right hand of guests, family members, close acquaintances or friends and squeeze it firmly (Hom. Il. 10,542 et passim; Xen. Cyr. 3,2,14; Aristoph. Nub. 81; Plut. Cicero 879; Plut. Antonius 952; Plut. De amicorum multitudine 94b), both as a greeting (according to Plut. Caesar 708 more a form of affability) and to say good-bye. Shaking hands was seen as a sign of friendship and trust (Xen. Cyr. 3…

Canistrum

(110 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (Greek κανοῦν; kanoûn). Flat wicker basket; it served as a fruit basket (Ov. Met. 8,675) and was used in agriculture (Verg. G. 4,280). Canistra of sturdy materials (clay, silver, gold) were used as receptacles for liquid substances, e.g. honey and oil. The canistrum was also a device for sacrifices (Tib. 1,10,27; Ov. Met. 2,713 and more); often represented in Roman art in this role, the canistrum contained incense, fruits and offering-cakes. The silver saucers for drinking vessels were called canistra siccaria (Serv. Aen. 1,706).  Kanoun Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bi…

Matta

(84 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ψίαθος/ psíathos). Matte oder grobe Decke aus Binsen und Stroh, in Ägypten auch aus Papyrus (vgl. Theophr. h. plant. 4,8,4). Sie diente den Bauern, Reisenden und armen Leuten zum Lagern auf dem Boden; in einer att. Inschr. auch unter dem Hausmobilar aufgeführt [1]. Nach Augustinus (contra Faustum 5,5) ist jemand, der auf der M. schläft, ein Anhänger einer Lehre, die Bedürfnislosigkeit predigt ( mattarius). Die Schlafmatte konnte auch χαμεύνη/ chameúnē genannt werden (Poll. 6,11). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 Hesperia 5, 1936, 382 Nr. 6 A.

Pergament

(334 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Zu einem der Beschreibstoffe der Ant. zählte das gereinigte, enthaarte und gegerbte Leder (Hdt. 5,58,3). P. entstand durch eine verfeinerte Bearbeitung der Tierhaut (von Esel, Kalb, Schaf, Ziege), bei der auf die Gerbung verzichtet wurde; statt dessen legte man die Tierhaut einige Tage in eine Kalklösung, entfernte sodann Fleischreste, Haare und Oberhaut, und legte sie danach in ein Kalkbad zur Reinigung (Kalzinierung). Anschließend spannte man die Haut in einen Rahmen, trocknete…

Epiblema

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ἐπίβλημα). Griech. Begriff für Decke, Tuch, Mantel (Poll. 7,49f.). In der modernen arch. Terminologie bezeichnet E. das Schultertuch der dädalischen, bes. der kretischen Frauenstatuetten. In der Regel wird das E. auf der Brust, aber auch über dem Hals und dem Schlüsselbein befestigt; der obere Rand ist mitunter verziert. Auf Denkmälern des 7. Jh.v.Chr. findet sich das E. häufig dargestellt. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography C. Davaras, Die Statue aus Astritsi, 8. Beih. AK, 1972, 26-27, 59-64.

Fer(i)culum

(131 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] seltener feretrum (z.B. Ov. met. 3,508; 14,747). Damit werden Tragevorrichtungen unterschiedlicher Form bezeichnet, die zum Befördern von Sachgütern nötig waren, speziell aber solche Gerüste, auf denen bei Aufzügen (Triumph, Bestattung o.ä.) Gegenstände präsentiert wurden, z.B. Beutestücke, Gefangene, Götterbilder u.a. (Suet. Caes. 76); ferner diente das f. zum Transport des Verstorbenen oder der Dinge, die mit ihm bestattet oder verbrannt werden sollten (Stat. Theb. 6,126). F. nannte man auch (Hausrat) das Speisebrett, die flache Schüssel, m…

Petasos

(180 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πέτασος). Griech. Hut aus Filz mit breiter Krempe, aufgrund seiner Herkunft auch als “thessalischer Hut” bezeichnet (Soph. Oid. K. 313); er wurde von Frauen und Männern getragen, die sich viel im Freien aufhielten (Fischer, Hirten, Jäger) oder auf Reisen waren; zu den bekanntesten myth. P.-Trägern zählen Hermes, Peleus, Perseus, Oidipus, Theseus. Weitere Träger sind - seltener - Wagenlenker (Athen. 5,200f.), Reiter (z.B. am Parthenonfries) und die att. Epheben ( ephēbeía ). Für einen sicheren Halt des p. sorgte ein Riemen, der unter das Kinn geführt wur…

Canosiner Vasen

(113 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Gattung der apulischen Vasen, zwischen ca. 350 und 300 v.Chr. wohl ausschließlich für den Grabgebrauch hergestellt. Als ihr besonderes Kennzeichen kann die in wasserlöslichen, verschiedenen Farben (blau, rot/rosa, gelb, hellviolett, braun) ausgeführte Bemalung auf weißem Grund gelten. Bevorzugte Gefäßformen sind Volutenkrater, Kantharos, Oinochoe und Askos, deren Gefäßkörper häufig mit auf kleinen Podesten stehenden Frauenfiguren und plastischem Dekor (geflügelte Köpfe, Gorgoneia…

Bustum

(90 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Der bereits im Zwölftafelgesetz (Cic. leg. 2, 64) als “Grab” definierte Terminus war nach Paul. Fest. 6, 78; 25,3; 27,11 und Serv. Aen. 11,201 der Ort, an dem die Leiche verbrannt und die Reste bestattet wurden, während die Brandstätte allgemein ustrinum heißt. Arch. ist diese Bestattungsform vielfach belegt. Bestattung Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography T. Bechert, Röm. Germanien zwischen Rhein und Maas, 1982, 244-246  M. Struck(Hrsg.), Römerzeitliche Gräber als Quellen zu Rel., Bevölkerungsstruktur und Sozialgesch., 1993 (Arch. Schrift…

Fischteller

(275 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Unter F. versteht die arch. Forschung Teller, die fast ausschließlich mit Fischen und anderen Meerestieren (Muschel, Tintenfisch, Garnele, Krabbe, Zitterrochen u.v.a.m.) in Malerei verziert sind; selten sind andere Motive (z.B. Hippokamp, Heuschrecke, Frauenkopf oder rein florale Ornamentik). Die F. haben einen breitem Standring und einen unterschiedlich hohen Stiel. Ihre Platte, mit nach außen umgebogenem Rand, neigt sich muldenförmig zum vertieftem Zentrum hin. Als keramisches …

Crepundia

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Meist metallenes Schmuck- und Spielzeug kleiner Kinder in Rom; neben der Bulla (Lebensalter) trugen sie, an einer Kette aufgereiht, um den Hals oder über die Schulter verschiedene solcher Miniaturgegenstände als Amulett. Die c. waren gleichzeitig Erkennungsmerkmal für ausgesetzte Kinder und wurden in einer cistella (Kistchen) zusammen mit anderen Kindersachen aufbewahrt (Plaut. Cist. 634ff., Plaut. Rud. 1151ff.). Amulett; Schmuck Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography E. Schmidt, Spielzeug und Spiele im klass. Altertum, 1971, 18-21 m. Abb. 1.

Limbus

(78 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Band, Borte oder Bordüre mit vielfältiger Bed. L. bezeichnet das Kopfband und den Gürtel, mehr aber den Besatzstreifen und Saum an Gewändern (Ov. met. 6, 127; Verg. Aen. 4,137), der auch bunt oder aus Gold sein konnte (Ov. met. 5, 51). Ferner nannte man den über dem Himmelsglobus laufenden Streifen, der den Tierkreis enthält, l. (Varro rust. 2,3,7, Tierkreiszeichen). Daneben waren l. die Schnüre an den Fangnetzen der Jäger und Fischer. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Geldbeutel

(343 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Im Griech. wie auch im Lat. gab es eine Vielzahl von Begriffen, die den G. bezeichneten, z.B. βαλ(λ)άντιον ( bal(l)ántion), μαρσίππιον ( marsíppion), θύλακος ( thýlakos), φασκώλιον ( phaskṓlion), crumina, marsuppium, pasceolus, saccus, sacculus, sacciperium, versica, ohne daß heute im einzelnen eine genaue Differenzierung möglich ist; vielleicht wurde nur eine Unterscheidung nach Farbe, Form und Größe getroffen, was man aus Plaut. Rud. 1313-1318 (dazu 548) vermuten darf. Die G. waren kleine Säckchen, die man, da d…

Anaxyrides

(122 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Iranische Hosen, von Skythen, Persern und benachbarten Völkern (Hdt. 7,61 ff.) sowie mythischen Gestalten des Orients (Amazonen, Troianer, Orpheus u. a.) getragen, zu deren Kennzeichnung sie dienten. Die A. waren den Griechen bereits im 6. Jh. v. Chr. bekannt (verschiedene Vasenbilder; “Persischer” Reiter, Athen AM Inv. 606). In der ant. Kunst werden die A. eng an den Beinen anliegend dargestellt, oft in Verbindung mit einem trikotartigen Oberteil, das die Arme bedeckt. Die orien…

Kosmetik

(558 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] In der griech. und röm. Ant. war der Bedarf an Essenzen, Ölen oder Pomaden immens. Man salbte sich, um die Haut zu pflegen, weich und zart zu halten (Athen. 15,686); die Salbung erstreckte sich auf den Kopf und den ganzen Körper, und vielfach war es üblich, sich mehrfach am Tag zu salben, wobei oft für jeden Körperteil eine andere Salbe benutzt wurde (Athen. 12,553d); ungesalbt galt man als schmutzig. Der Überl. nach waren Tierfett und Butter die ersten dazu verwandten Mittel (vg…

Delphica

(65 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Die runden Prunktische auf drei Füßen (Hausrat; Möbel) wurden von den Römern D. genannt in Anlehnung an den Delphischen Dreifuß (Prok. BV 1,21). Die in der Lit. erwähnten D. (Mart. 12,66f.; Cic. Verr. 2,4,131) sind evtl. mit den v.a. aus den Vesuvstädten überlieferten Tischen zu identifizieren. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography G.M.A. Richter, The Furniture of the Greeks, Etruscans and Romans, 1966, 111-112.

Fritillus

(136 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (φιμός, phimós). Der Würfelbecher diente zum Werfen der Spielsteine und Astragale bei unterschiedlichen Brettspielen und Würfelspielen (Hor. sat. 2,7,17; Iuv. 14,5; Mart. 4,14,7-9; 5,84,1-5 u.ö.; Sen. apocol. 12,3,31; 14,4; 15,1; Sidon. epist. 2,9,4 usw.). Neben den aus vergänglichem Material hergestellten Würfelbechern gab es solche aus Ton [1. Abb. 15 aus Mainz-Kastell, Wiesbaden] und Bronze (schol. Iuv. 14,5 nennt Horn). Eine entsprechende Funktion nahmen die ( turricula oder pyrgus genannten) Spieltürme aus Elfenbein, Holz oder Kupferblech e…

Perirrhanterion

(203 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (περιρ(ρ)αντήριον). Großes Becken aus Ton, Marmor oder Kalkstein auf hohem Ständer mit zylindrischem Schaft und Basis von z.T. beträchtlichen Ausmaßen, wobei das Becken mit dem Ständer entweder fest verbunden oder abnehmbar ist. In Form und Aussehen dem Luterion (Labrum) ähnlich, diente das P. zum rituellen Reinigen durch Besprengen mit Wasser und stand vor Tempeln, an den Eingängen zu Heiligtümern bzw. an Kultorten in Gymnasien oder bei Hermen (während man das Luterion zur körpe…

Ring

(768 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (δακτύλιος/ daktýlios, ἀκαρές/ akarés; lat. anulus). Unter R. werden im folgenden ausschließlich Finger-R. verstanden (zu Ohr-R. s. Ohrschmuck). Bereits die R. der Aigina- und Thyreatis-Schatzfunde aus dem beginnenden 2. Jt. v. Chr. zeigen hervorragende Beherrschung der Technik und hohe künstlerische Qualität. Aus der frühmyk. Zeit sind Golddraht- und Silber-R. zu nennen, daneben auch die sog. Schild-R., die sich zu einer Leitform des myk. Schmucks entwickeln und ihren Namen nach der …

Astragal

(241 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(Ἀστράγαλος). [English version] [1] s. Ornament s. Ornament Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [English version] [2] Spielstein Spielstein ( talus). Fußwurzelknochen von Kälbern und Schafen/Ziegen, ebenso aus Gold, Glas, Marmor, Ton, Metallen und Elfenbein verfertigt, bereits bei Hom. Il. 23,85-88 als Spielgerät erwähnt. Man verwandte den A. als Zählmarke für Glücks-, Würfel- und Wurfspiele, wozu das Spiel “Grad oder ungrad” (Plat. Lys. 206e) oder πεντάλιθα ( pentálitha, Geschicklichkeitsspiele) gehörten. Beim A.-Spiel hatten die einzelnen Seiten unterschiedliche Zä…

Löffel

(269 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] L. fanden zunächst als Rühr- oder Koch-L. (griech. τορύνη/ torýnē, Aristoph. Equ. 984, vgl. Anth. Pal. 6,305; 306, lat. trua oder trulla) bei der Zubereitung von Speisen Verwendung. Zum Schöpfen von flüssigen Nahrungsmitteln oder Wein diente der κύαθος/ kýathos. Wenn der L. auch schon früh bekannt war, so fand er trotzdem beim Speisen wenig Verwendung, da man vornehmlich ausgehöhltes Brot (μυστίλη/ mystílē, μύστρον/ mýstron) zum Verzehr von Breien, Brühen oder Suppen u.ä. benutzte (Aristoph. Equ. 1168-1174). Der Römer unterschied Löffel mit ovaler Schale ( ligul…

Labrum

(339 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (aus lavabrum, Diminutiv labellum, griech. λουτήριον/ lutḗrion und λεκάνη/ lekánē). Das L., ein großes flaches Becken mit aufgewölbtem Rand und hohem Fuß, diente unterschiedlichen Zwecken. Als Material für das L. werden Marmor, Porphyr, Ton, Stein u.a. gen. Im griech. Bereich ist L. ein Waschbecken, an dem sich Männer und Frauen mit Wasser reinigten; auf unterital. Vasen findet dies häufig in Anwesenheit von Eros statt, mitunter tummeln sich Wasservögel (Schwan oder Gans) im Wasser des L.…

Pera

(142 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (πήρα/ pḗra, πηρίδιον/ pērídion, lat. pera). Ein Beutel oder Ranzen zum Tragen von Brot (Theokr. 1,49; Athen. 10,422b), Saatgut (Anth. Pal. 6,95; 104) oder Kräutern und Gemüse (Aristoph. Plut. 298), der zur Ausrüstung von Jägern (Anth. Pal. 6,176), Hirten (Anth. Pal. 6,177) oder Fischern gehörte und mittels eines Riemens über der Schulter an der Hüfte getragen wurde. Die p. war schon bei Hom. Od. 13,437; 17,197; 410; 466 Erkennungszeichen des Bettlers (vgl. Aristoph. Nub. 924) und galt später, zusammen mit dem Wanderstab ( báktron, lat. baculum, Stab), als Symbol…

Oscillum

(157 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Gruppe von runden oder peltaförmigen, d.h. nach der Form des Amazonenschilds gebildeten und reliefierten Schmuckscheiben aus der Zeit vom 1. Jh.v.bis zur Mitte des 2. Jh.n.Chr. aus Marmor. Die Oscilla stammen zum größten Teil aus den Vesuvstädten und wurden in Villen und Stadthäusern mit Gartenanlagen gefunden, in denen sie, an Ketten in den Interkolumnien des Gartenperistyls aufgehängt, zur Dekoration dienten. Andere fanden sich als Schmuckelemente in Theatern und in Tempelanlag…

Kemos

(83 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κημός, spätgriech. χάμος; lat. c[h]amus, -um). Unter k. sind diverse Sachgüter zusammengefaßt, die offenbar von der Grundbedeutung des Umschlingens, Verhüllens usw. ausgehen. Darunter fallen der Maulsack der Pferde, aus dem sie ihr Futter zu sich nehmen (Hesych. s.v.), wie auch die Fischreuse, ferner ein Tuch, das sich die Bäcker um Mund und Nase banden (Athen. 12,548c) bzw. das die Frauen zur Verhüllung der unteren Gesichtshälfte in der Öffentlichkeit trugen. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography H. Schenkl, s.v. K., RE 11, 157-162.

Dienst- und Ehrentracht

(479 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Durch die D. wurde ihr Träger aus der Gesellschaft hervorgehoben und in seiner Funktion kenntlich gemacht. Dies trifft bes. auf Priesterinnen, staatliche Beamte, aber ebenso auf Gesandte (Heroldsstab) o.ä. zu. In Griechenland trugen die Priester ein weißes Gewand (Plat. leg. 12,965a), den ungegürteten Chiton, der auch rot, seltener safran- oder purpurgefärbt sein konnte. Ein Kennzeichen war auch der Kranz ( stephanophóroi, “Kranzträger”, hießen deshalb die Priester z.B. in Milet); ferner traten Priester mitunter mit den Attributen der jew…

Fasciae

(227 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Bandagen, Binden, Gurte der unterschiedlichsten Art; sie waren aus verschiedenen Materialien (Filz, Leder, Leinen, Wollstoff) und konnten weiß oder bunt sein. Unter die f. fallen zum einen die Gurte des Bettes ( lectus, Kline), auf denen die Matratze auflag, ferner Windeln (σπάργανα, spárgana) und schließlich f. crurales, Binden, die die Unterschenkel ( f. tibiales) bzw. Oberschenkel ( feminalia) gegen Kälte schützen sollten. Bei Männern galt die Verwendung der f. als weibisch und war nur für Kränkelnde angebracht, doch trugen solche f. auch Augustus (Suet. …

Mörser

(232 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (ὅλμος/ hólmos, ἴγδις/ ígdis, θύεια/ thýeia, ὕπερον/ hýperon, lat. mortarium, pistillum, pila). M. und M.-Keulen oder -Stößel aus unterschiedlichen Materialien gehörten zu den notwendigen Utensilien des Haushaltes (Plaut. Aul. 94-95; Hausrat), um Teig zu kneten, Getreide zu mahlen, Früchte, Gewürze u.a. zu zerkleinern und zu mischen; des weiteren dienten M. zur Zubereitung von Kosmetika und Pharmaka, Farben oder Metallmischungen. Zu den M. gehören die kleineren Reibschalen (mit und ohne Tülle und rundem Reibstein, lat. coticula genannt, Plin. nat. 34,1…

Python

(1,046 words)

Author(s): Junk, Tim (Kiel) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Engels, Johannes (Köln) | Schmitt, Hatto H. (München) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Et al.
(Πύθων). [English version] [1] Von Apollon bei Delphi getöteter Drache Ein ungeheurer Drache, den Apollon bei Delphoi mit seinen Pfeilen tötet. Die älteste Fassung der Gesch. bietet Hom. h. 3,300-374: Apollon besiegt eine Drachin, die in der Nähe von Delphoi ihr Unwesen treibt und der Hera ihren Sohn Typhon in Obhut gegeben hat. Nach ihrem verfaulenden (πύθεσθαι/ pýthesthai) Leichnam erhalten der Ort und der Gott den Beinamen Pythṓ (vgl. auch den Namen der delphischen Seherin Pythía [1]). Nach Eur. Iph. T. 1245-1252 ist der Drache männlich und bew…

Kampanische Vasenmalerei

(579 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] In der k.V. des 5.-4. Jh. v.Chr. sind die Gefäße aus einem hellbräunlichen Ton hergestellt, häufig wird die Oberfläche mit einem rosafarbenen bis roten Überzug versehen. Allg. bevorzugen die Maler kleinere Gefäßtypen, daneben als Leitform die Bügelhenkelamphora, ferner Hydrien und Glockenkratere, nur selten erscheint die Pelike (Gefäße, Gefäßformen mit Abb.). Die für die apulische Vasenmalerei charakteristischen Voluten- und Kolonettenkratere, Lutrophoren, Rhyta oder Nestoriden f…

Hirschfeld-Maler

(210 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Att. Vasenmaler der geom. Zeit (Spätgeom. I b, nach 750 v.Chr.; geometrische Vasenmalerei), benannt nach Gustav Hirschfeld (1847-1897), der das 1870 ausgegrabene Hauptwerk, den sog. Hirschfeldkrater (Athen, NM Inv. Nr. 990), erstmalig beschrieb [1; 2]. Der H. und seine Werkstatt standen in der Nachfolge des Dipylon-Malers und stellten vorzugsweise monumentale Kratere her, von denen insbes. der eponyme Krater und ein weiterer in New York (MMA Inv. Nr. 14.130. 14) aufgrund der darg…

Lacerna

(155 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] Fransenbesetzter (schol. Pers. 1,54), offener Mantel, eine Sonderform des sagum , wahrscheinlich im 1. Jh.v.Chr. eingeführt (erstmalige Erwähnung Cic. Phil. 2,30,76); diente zunächst als Soldatenmantel, den in der Dichtung auch mythische Könige und Heroen tragen konnten (z.B. Ov. fast. 2,743-747; Prop. 4,3,18). Die L. wurde schon bald zu einem Gewand des Alltags und war im 1. Jh.n.Chr. beliebt. Anfangs aus grober Wolle, verwandte man auch leichte Stoffe, die purpurn oder…

Klismos

(96 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] (κλισμός, lat. cathedra). Der K. ist ein hoher Stuhl ohne Armlehnen mit breiter, ausladender Rückenlehne, seit Homer (z.B. Il. 8,436; Od. 4,136) als Sitz der Vornehmen, Götter und Heroen belegt. In der griech. und röm. Kunst findet dies Bestätigung, aber ebenso ist er in Hausgemach-, Schulszenen und weiteren Alltagsdarstellungen oft genug zu sehen. Mitunter legen die Sitzenden aus Bequemlichkeit und zur Entspannung einen Arm auf die Rückenlehne, häufig wird das entspannte Sitzen durch Fußschemel und Sitzkissen unterstützt. Diphros; Möbel Hurschmann, Rolf (H…

Möbel

(1,353 words)

Author(s): Cholidis, Nadja (Berlin) | Veigel, Isabell (Berlin) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[English version] I. Alter Orient M. lassen sich für den alten Orient seit dem 6. Jt. v.Chr. nachweisen, so im Bildnis einer weiblichen Figur aus Çatal Hüyük, die auf einem von Feliden flankierten Stuhl thront. Fundiertere Aussagen sind jedoch erst ab dem 3. Jt.v.Chr. möglich, als schriftl. Quellen hinzukommen. Von den meist aus Holz, Schilfrohr, textilem Flechtwerk oder Leder gefertigten M. ist im Vorderen Orient aufgrund des aggressiven Klimas kaum etwas erh. geblieben. Kostbare Einzelstücke konnte…
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