Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Hartner, W." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Hartner, W." )' returned 29 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Naẓīr

(99 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, Naẓīr al-samt (a.), Eng. and Fr. nadir, the bottom, the pole of the horizon (invisible) under the observer in the direction of the vertical, also the deepest (lowest) point in the sphere of heaven. The nadir is the opposite pole to the zenith [see samt al-raʾs ]. The word naẓīr (from naẓara “to see”, “to observe”) originally (and generally) means the point diametrically opposite a point on the circumference of a circle or the surface of a sphere; we find muḳābal as a synonym of naẓīr in this general meaning [see also muḳābala ]. (W. Hartner)

Mut̲h̲allat̲h̲

(419 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
(a.), also mut̲h̲allat̲h̲a , pl. always mut̲h̲allat̲h̲āt , triangle; it forms the first category of plane surfaces bounded by straight lines ( al-basāʾiṭ al-musaṭṭaḥa al-mustaḳīmat al-k̲h̲uṭūṭ (cf. al-K̲h̲wārazmī, Mafātīḥ , 206). Following Euclid’s Elements, i, ʿΟρος 24-9, the Arab mathematicians classify triangles from two points of view: either according to the sides ( ḍilʿ , pl. aḍlāʿ ) into equilateral ( al-mut̲h̲allat̲h̲ al-mutasāwī ’l-aḍlāʿ , in Euclid τρίγωνον ὶσόπλευρον), isosceles ( al-mut̲h̲allat̲h̲ al-mutasawi ’l-ḍilʿayn , τρίγωνον ἰσοσκελές), and scalene ( al-mu…

Asṭurlāb

(4,885 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
or aṣṭurlāb (Ar.; on the vocalization see also Ibn Ḵh̲allikān, no. 779; idem, Būlāḳ, no. 746), Astrolabe. The word was derived from the Greek ἀστρολάβος or ἀστρολάβον (ὄργανον), name of several astronomical instruments serving various theoretical and practical purposes, such as the demonstration and graphical solution of many problems of spherical astronomy, the measuring of altitudes, the determination of the hour of the day and the night, and the casting of horoscopes. In Arabic the word Asṭurlāb when used alone always means the flat or planisphe…

Ḥabas̲h̲ al-Ḥāsib al-Marwazī

(1,087 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, Aḥmad b. ʿAbd Allāh , one of the most important and interesting figures in early Islamic astronomy, hailing from Marw, but living in Bag̲h̲dād. The sobriquet “Ḥabas̲h̲” (“the Abyssinian”) is nowhere explained; it may refer to the dark colour of his skin. While the Fihrist (p. 275) mentions only that he reached the age of 100, Ibn al-Ḳifṭī ( Taʾrīk̲h̲ , 170) gives more detailed information on his life and the various stages of his scientific activity. According to him, he lived in the reigns of al-Maʾmūn and al-Muʿtaṣim, which is co…

Falak

(2,078 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, Sphere, in particular the Celestial Sphere. a. Etymology and semantic evolution. The word falak (pl. aflāk ) occurs already in the Ḳurʾān with the specific significance “celestial sphere” (xxi, 34 “it is He who has created night and day, the Sun and the Moon, each of which moves in its own sphere”; similarly xxxvi, 40). Etymologically and semantically it has a long history: it can be traced back to Sumerian origins, where the stem bala (≷ * pilak ) already has the meaning “to be round” or also “to turn around”. In Akk. it appears as pilakku , which denotes the whorl o…

al-Kayd

(2,021 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, name of a fictitious star, defined in the Mafātīḥ al-ʿulūm (ed. van Vloten, Leiden 1895, 229) as nad̲j̲m naḥis fi ’l-samāʾ lā yurā wa-lahū “ḥisab maʿlūm yustak̲h̲rad̲j̲u bihī mawḍiʿuhū , “an ill-omened ¶ invisible star in the heavens, having a known ephemeris from which its position can be derived”. It is not mentioned in LA and TA. Although occurring in at least one oriental text printed in Europe ( Anonymus Per sa de Siglis Arabum et Persarum , ed. and tr. J. Gravius, London 1648), it seems to have escaped the attention of historians of astronomy…

al-Mus̲h̲tarī

(734 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, the planet Jupiter, Pers. Hurmizd < Aurmazd (Ahura-mazdāh). The name of the planet is in Sumerian S̲h̲ulpaʾe, later also Mulu-babbar “the white star” (= Μολοβαβαρ in Hesychios; cf. Meissner, Babylonien und Assyrien, Heidelberg 1925, ii. 404); in the later Accadian period it is always identified with the numen supremum Marduk (Biblical Merodach). In Hebrew it is called Ṣedeḳ, in Greek — just as among the Babylonians, as the symbol of the highest deity — ὁ τοῦ ΔιὸΣ ἀστήρ. As a synonym of al-Mus̲h̲tarī we find (e. g. in Ḥadīt̲h̲) the name Bard̲j̲īs (cf. Lisan al-ʿArab, vii. 323). The Arab ast…

al-D̲j̲awzahar

(865 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
or al-D̲j̲awzahr , technical term occurring in Arabic and Persian astrological and astronomical texts. 1. It indicates primarily the two lunar nodes, al-ʿuḳdatāni , i.e., the two diametrically opposite points of intersection between the moon’s orbit and the ecliptic: the ascending node or “head”, raʾs , and the descending node or “tail”, d̲h̲anab ( scil . of the ¶ dragon, al-tinnīn ). In many cases it refers only to the “head”; in some mss. a special word, nawbahr , is used for the “tail” [see below]. The word Ḏj̲awzahar, though explained differently in the Mafātīḥ al-ʿulūm

al-Nahr

(858 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, the constellation of the River (Eridanus). It corresponds to the ΠοταμόΣ, Flumen, Amnis of the ancients (cf. Aratos, Φαινόμενα, l. 358; Geminus, Εἰσαγωγή; Ptolemy, Almagest). Aratos observes (l. 360) — probably one of the first to do so, — that the river of heaven represents Eridanus (’ΗριδανόΣ, river of the morning? or river of darkness, of the west?) turned into stars, into which Phaeton, son of Helios, fell, struck by the thunderbolt of Zeus, after his unsuccessful attempt to ride to heaven. [The opinions of the Gr…

al-D̲j̲abr wa ’l-Muḳābala

(2,372 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, originally two methods of transforming equations, later the name given to the theory of equations (algebra). The oldest Arabic work on algebra, composed ca. 850 A.D. by Muḥ. b. Mūsā al-K̲h̲wārizmī [ q.v.], consistently uses these methods for reducing certain problems to canonical forms; al-K̲h̲wārizmī’s work was edited with English translation by F. Rosen, London 1831. A revision of Rosen’s text is badly needed, cf. S. Gandz, The Mishnat ha Middot , in Quellen u. Stud. z. Gesch. d. Math. , Abt. A: Quellen, 2, 1932, 61 ff.; the translation is arbitrary and often wrong, not the…

Abū Kāmil S̲h̲ud̲j̲āʿ

(1,240 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
b. Aslam b. Muh. b. S̲h̲ud̲j̲āʿ al-Ḥāsib al-Miṣrī , next to Muḥ. b. Mūsā al-Ḵh̲wārizmī [ q.v.] the oldest Islamic algebraist of whose writings we still possess some remains; they entitle us to place him among the greatest mathematicians of the Islamic Middle Ages (for the development of Islamic algebra see al-d̲j̲abr wa ’l-muḳābala ). Through Leonard of Pisa and his followers he exercised considerable influence on the development of algebra in Europe and no less great was the impact of his geometrical writings (algebraic treat…

Asṭurlāb

(4,712 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
ou Aṣṭurlāb (A.; sur la vocalisation, voir aussi Ibn Ḵh̲allikān. n° 779, éd. Būlāḳ, n° 746), astrolabe. Le mot a été tiré du grec άστρολάβοΣ ou άστρολάβον, (ὄργανον) nom de plusieurs instruments astronomiques servant à des fins théoriques et pratiques variées, telles que la démonstration et la solution graphique de nombreux problèmes d’astronomie sphérique, la mesure des altitudes, la détermination de l’heure du jour et de la nuit et l’établissement d’horoscopes. En arabe, le mot asṭurlāb, employé seul, désigne toujours l’astrolabe plat ou planisphérique basé sur le pr…

al-Kayd

(2,166 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, nom d’une étoile fictive que les Mafātīḥ al-ʿulūm (éd. van Vloten, Leyde 1895, 229) définissent ainsi: nad̲j̲m naḥis fī l-samāʾ lā yurā wa-lahū ḥisāb maʿlūm yustak̲h̲rad̲j̲ bihī mawḍiʿuhū, «une étoile de mauvais augure, invisible dans le ciel, qui a une éphéméride connue permettant de déduire sa position ». Il n’en est fait état ni dans le LA ni dans le TA; bien que mentionnée dans au moins un texte oriental imprimé en Europe ( Anonymus Persa de Siglis Arabum et Persarum, éd. et tr. J. Gravius, Londres 1648), elle semble avoir échappé à l’attention des historiens de l’astr…

al-Ḏj̲abr wa-l-Muḳābala

(2,294 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, à l’origine deux méthodes de transformation des équations; plus tard, nom donné à la théorie des équations (algèbre). L’ouvrage arabe le plus ancien sur l’algèbre, composé vers 235/850 par Muḥammad b. Mūsā al-Ḵh̲wārizmī [ q.v.] et édité avec traduction anglaise par F. Rosen, Londres 1831, utilise d’une facon logique ces méthodes pour réduire certains problèmes à des formes classiques. Le texte de Rosen aurait besoin d’être sérieusement revisé (cf. S. Gandz, The Mishnat ha Middot, dans Quellen u. Stud. z. Gesch. d. Math., Abt. A; Quellen, 2, 1932, 61 sqq.); la traduction est arb…

Falak

(1,987 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, sphère et particulièrement sphère céleste. A. — Étymologie et évolution sémantique. Le mot falak (pl. aflāk) apparaît déjà dans le Ḳurʾān avec le sens spécifique de «sphère céleste» (XXI, 34: «c’est Lui qui a créé la nuit et le jour, le Soleil et la Lune, dont chacun se meut dans sa propre sphère»; de même, XXXVI, 40). Étymologiquement et sémantiquement, il a une longue histoire, car on peut le faire remonter à une origine sumérienne où la racine bala (≶ * pilak) a déjà le sens d’«être rond» ou aussi de «tourner autour». En accadien, il apparaît sous la forme pilakku qui désigne le peson du f…

Naẓīr

(109 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, Nahẓīr al-Samt (a.), français et anglais nadir, «pendant, vis-à-vis», désigne le point situé sous nos pieds, le pôle (invisible) de l’horizon, situé dans la direction de la verticale (la perpendiculaire) au-dessous de l’observateur, également le point le plus profond (le plus bas) de la sphère céleste. La nadir est le point opposé au zénith [voir Samt al-Raʾs]. Le mot naẓīr (de naẓara, «voir», «observer») signifie originellement (et d’une façon générale) le point diamétralement opposé à un point de la circonférence d’un cercle ou de la surface de la sphè…

Mut̲h̲allat̲h̲

(415 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
ou Mut̲h̲allat̲h̲a (a.) (plur. des deux: mut̲h̲allat̲h̲āt) «triangle»; il constitue la première catégorie des surfaces planes limitées par des droites ( al-basāʾiṭ al-musaṭṭaḥa al-mustaḳīmat al-k̲h̲uṭūṭ; voir al-Ḵh̲wārazmī, Mafātīḥ, 206). En s’inspirant des Éléments d’Euclide, I, “Opoç, 24-29, les mathématiciens arabes divisent les triangles en se plaçant à deux points ¶ de vue différents: ou bien, d’après les côtés ( dilʿ pl. aḍlāʿ), en triangles équilatéraux ( al-mut̲h̲allath al-mutasāwī l-aḍlāʿ, chez Euclide τρίγωνον ἱσόπλευρον), isocèles ( al-m. al-mutasāwī l-ḍilʿa…

al-Ḏj̲awzahar

(858 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, ou al-Ḏj̲awzahr, terme technique qu’on rencontre dans les textes astrologiques et astronomiques arabes et persans. 1. Il indique en premier lieu les deux nœuds lunaires, al-ʿuḳdatān, c’est-à-dire les deux points diamétralement opposés d’intersection de l’orbite de la lune et de l’écliptique: le nœud ascendant ou «tête» ( raʾs), et le nœud descendant ou «queue» ( d̲h̲anab [du dragon, al-Tinnīn]). Dans de nombreux cas, il ne désigne que la «tête»; dans quelques mss, un mot spécial, nawbahr, est employé pour la «queue» (voir ci-dessous). Le mot d̲j̲awzahar, bien qu’expliqué différ…

Ḥabas̲h̲ al-Ḥāsib al-Marwazī

(1,058 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, Aḥmad b. Ābd Allāh, l’une des figures les plus importantes et les plus intéressantes des premiers temps de l’astronomie islamique; originaire de Marw, il vivait à Bag̲h̲dād. Le sobriquet «Ḥabas̲h̲» («l’Abyssin») n’est expliqué nulle part, mais il provient peut-être de la couleur foncée de sa peau. Alors que le Fihrist (275) dit seulement qu’il atteignit l’âge de 100 ans, Ibn al-Ḳifṭī ( Taʾrīk̲h̲, 170) donne des informations plus détaillées sur sa vie et les différentes étapes de son activité scientifique. Selon lui, il vécut sous les règnes d’al-Maʾmūn et…

al-Mus̲h̲tarī

(768 words)

Author(s): Hartner, W.
, la planète Jupiter, en persan Hurmizd < Aurmazd (Ahura-mazdāh). Le nom de la planète en sumérien est S̲h̲ulpaʾe; plus tard, on trouve aussi Mulu-babbar «l’astre blanc» (= Μολοβαβαρ dans Hésychios; cf. Μeissner, Babylonien und Assyrien, Heidelberg 1925, II, 404); à l’époque akkadienne postérieure, elle est toujours identifiée au «numen supremum» Marduk (Merodach de la Bible). En hébreu, elle s’appelle Ṣedeḳ, en grec — comme chez les Babyloniens en tant que symbole de la plus haute divinité — ὁ τoῦ ΔιòΣ ἀστήρ. Bird̲j̲īs se trouve, par ex. dans le ḥadīt̲h̲, comme synonyme d’al-Mus̲h̲…
▲   Back to top   ▲