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Philodemus

(2,276 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
(Φιλόδημος; Philódēmos). [German version] A. Life and work Born in Gadara around 110 BC; in Athens, pupil of the Epicurean philosopher Zeno of Sidon; after Zeno's death, in the mid-70s, P. went to Italy. In Rome he became friends with L. Calpurnius [I 19] Piso Caesoninus (cf. Cic. Pis. 68-72) and took up residence at the Villa dei Pisoni (also called the 'Villa dei Papiri') in Herculaneum, where he met Siron and the poets Quinctilius Varus, L. Varius Rufus, Plotius and Vergilius. P. died after 40 BC. Before the library in the 'Villa dei Papiri' (Herculanean papyri) was discovered…

Cartonnage

(132 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] Cardboard or papier mâché made from used pieces of papyrus for making mummy bandages (for humans or animals). Common in Egypt during the Ptolemaic period (find spots: necropoleis of Ghoran, Madīnet al-Nuḥās, Al-Ḥība); a number of examples can be dated to the end of the Augustan period (find spots: Abū Ṣīr al-Malaq). Numerous 3rd-cent. BC fragments of Greek literary texts (e.g. Callimachus, Menander, Plato; list in [1]) and copies of documents (petitions or submissions/ enteúxeis to the Ptolemaic court) have been recovered from dismantled cartonnage. Dorandi, Tizia…

Anaxarchus

(169 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (᾿Ανάξαρχος, Anáxarchos) of Abdera. Democritean philosopher ( Democriteans, c. 380-320 BC). He accompanied Alexander the Great on his campaign to the East. After Alexander's death, A. was taken prisoner and then pounded to death in a mortar by Nicocreon, the tyrant of Salamis on Cyprus, with whom he had quarrelled. In the ancient records, A.'s attitude towards Alexander the Great wavers between adoration and irony. A. was the author of a treatise Περὶ βασιλείας ( Perì basileías), of which only two fragments are preserved (fr. 65-66). The assessments of h…

Manuale

(138 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] Portable wooden reading desk. Manuale was probably originally an adjectival attribute of lectorium. Substanticised it then took on the meaning of (reading) desk [1]. The sole written reference is found in Mart. 14,84. A manuale is illustrated on two reliefs from Neumagen [1. fig. 15-16] and in Vergil's Codex Romanus (Cod. Vaticanus Latinus 3867, VI). Two kinds of reading desk are attested: one with a base and one without. Only the latter can be defined as a manuale as such. This is a wooden board with ends so bent as to hold in depressions both rolled-up e…

Chaeredemus

(58 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Χαιρέδημος; Chairédēmos). One of the three brothers of  Epicurus, who, like him, devoted themselves to philosophy (Diog. Laert. 10,3). He predeceased Epicurus, who bestowed funerary gifts in his memory (Diog. Laert. 10,18) and dedicated a book to him (Diog. Laert. 10,27 and Plut. An recte dictum sit latenter esse vivendum 1129a). Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)

Siron

(89 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Σίρων; Sírōn). Epicurean philosopher, 1st cent. BC, who lived and worked in Neapolis. Known only from sparse testimonies [1]. It is uncertain whether he wrote at all. S. was an acquaintance of Philodemus (fr. 1) and a friend of Cicero (fr. 2-5). His most famous student was doubtlessly the Roman poet Vergilius who in his youth had studied Epicurean philosophy with him and remained close to him throughout his life (fr. 6-13). Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography 1 M. Gigante, I frammenti di Sirone, in: Paideia 45, 1990, 175-198.

Hermarchus

(496 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Ἕρμαρχος; Hérmarchos). Born in Mytilene on Lesbos, a contemporary of  Epicurus. In his youth he was trained in rhetoric and encountered Epicurus in Mytilene in about 310 BC. H. did not immediately turn to philosophy, but only followed his teacher Epicurus to Athens after he had founded a school (306 BC). From 290 to 270 BC he went to Lampsacus to visit the Epicurean school there. Before his death in 270 BC, Epicurus transferred the leadership of the Athenian school to H. despite h…

Kepos

(120 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] The philosopher Epicurus owned a house in the Attic deme of Melite (Diog. Laert. 10,17) and a garden (κῆπος; kêpos), the seat of his school (Cic. Fin. 5,1,3; Sen. Ep. 21,10; Plin. HN 19,50; Diog. Laert. 10,11). The localization of this garden is disputed. It was either outside the city between the Dipylon Gate and the Academy (Heliodorus, Aethiopica 1,16,5) [2], or in the city itself ( in ipsa urbe, Plin. HN 19,50), adjoining the house in the deme of Melite or very close by [1]. Epicurus; Epicurean School Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography 1 E. Wycherley, The Garden of E…

Herculanean papyri

(884 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] A. Definition Papyri with Latin and Greek texts found during the Bourbon excavations in the middle of the 18th cent. in a villa near  Herculaneum (with site map). These were part of the library of the poet and philosopher  Philodemus of Gadara, who had gone from Athens to Italia during the period 80-70 BC and maintained a friendly relationship there with L.  Calpurnius [I 19] Piso Caesoninus, the owner of the villa in Herculaneum. In this luxurious villa, Philodemus collected an ext…

Scheda

(204 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] ( schida, scida) has various meanings in Latin authors: (1) a sheet or piece of papyrus or parchment (Pugillares) for notes or short messages (Cic. Att. 1,20,7; Quint. Inst. 1,8,19; Mart. 4,89,4; CGL IV 422,52; V 243,10 and 482,57;  cf. [1. 4920]). (2) In Late Antiquity s./ schedula is the term for a 'rough draft' of a literary work; cf. Isid. Etym. 6,14,8 “scheda est quod adhuc emendatur, et necdum in libris redactum est” ("scheda describes a text which still has to be corrected and is not yet finished"; the interpretation i…

Patron

(113 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Πάτρων; Pátrōn). Epicurean, successor in 70 BC to Phaedrus [4] of Athens as director of the 'Garden' of the Epicurean School at Athens (Phlegon of Tralleis, FGrH 257 F 12 § 8). P. had previously gone to Rome, where he had become acquainted with Cicero, C. Memmius [I 3], Catullus, Atticus (Cic. Fam. 13,1) and Saufeius (Cic. Att. 4,6,1). A successful intervention by Cicero on P.'s initiative prevented C. Memmius from having a house built in the deme of Melite on the site of the house of Epicurus (Cic. Att. 5,11,6; Fam. 13,1,5). Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography M. Erler, …

Timasagoras

(134 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Τιμασαγόρας; Timasagóras). Epicurean 'deviant' ( sophistḗs), living in Rhodes presumably in the 2nd cent. BC. T., who shared the philosophical views of Nicasicrates, the leader of the Epicurean school there, is accused together with him (primarily by Philodemus) of having misappropriated Epicurean theories by setting themselves in opposition to the founders ( kathēgemónes). T.' interest was in the theory of perception, particularly vision (PHercul. 19/698). T. and Nicasicrates were of the opinion that anger is an affect that shoul…

Carneiscus

(86 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Καρνεΐσκος; Karneískos). Pupil of  Epicurus, originating in Asia Minor, perhaps from Cos or Rhodes. In his work Φιλίστας ( Philístas), comprising at least two volumes, he wrote on the Epicurean concept of friendship. The end of the 2nd volume (extant in PHercul. 1027) is dedicated to one Zopyrus, otherwise unknown. C. expresses his disagreement with the Peripatetic philosopher  Praxiphanes, criticizing his writing on friendship for suggesting improper forms of relationship between friends.  Epicurean School Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography T. Dorandi,…

Copy

(2,225 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] A. Introductory comments Copy should be understood in two ways: on the one hand, it refers to the copying of a literary work beginning with the first version and throughout the various writing phases, including the alteration of the text into book form. On the other hand, it refers to the copies of a book intended for its systematic, ‘publisher driven’ dissemination. Copy thus refers to both the working methods of ancient authors and to the realm of book production. Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) [German version] B. Copying-techniques There are only few indirect records a…

Punctuation

(2,578 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
I. Greek [German version] A. General The common practice of ancient Greek copyists to write prose as well as poetry in scriptio continua, that is without grouping individual letters into words to delineate units of meaning, must have given rise to serious reading and comprehension difficulties. Punctuation was introduced as a remedy but only sporadically and without fixed rules. On some Greek inscriptions from the 5th/4th cent. BC, words are separated by a horizontal row of dots [4]. Dots are also frequently document…

Pugillares

(227 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (or pugillaria, mostly: 'notebook'). Latin substantive, derived from pugillus, a diminutive of pugnus ('fist', 'closed hand'); the etymology emphasises that it is an object of such restricted size that it can be held there. In Latin texts pugillares. is a term for a small writing surface; sometimes it occurs as a synonym for libellus or codicillus ('small manuscript'). What is meant are mostly wax or wood tablets (such as those from Vindolanda in Britain, cf. [3]) or sheets of parchment ( pugillares membranei, Mart. 14,7) fastened together. Ancient authors wro…

Opisthographos

(199 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (ὀπισθογράφος, -ον/ opisthográphos, -on; Latin opisthographus, -a, -um), lit. 'written on the reverse', adj., sometimes also used as a noun; a technical term rarely attested in antiquity. Ancient authors paraphrased or used synonyms instead (ὄπισθεν/ ópisthen or κατόπισθεν/ katópisthen, ὀπίσω/ opísō, κατόπιν/ katópin). In antiquity, opisthographos denoted either a roll with a text which continued from the recto to the verso (Plin. Ep. 3,5,17; opisthographum Ulp. Dig. 37,11,4) or a roll with a text on the back of the papyrus (Lucian. Vitarum au…

Epicurean School

(1,973 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] A. School of Epicurus The school, founded in Athens in 307/6 or 305/4, survived as an institution until the 1st cent. BC. After a period of obscurity we again come across references, from the 2nd cent. AD, to some Epicurean philosophers. It was between the 4th and 1st cents. BC that the Epicurean School received its strength and vitality, extending both its range of thought and its structure. That happened under a series of school heads from Epicurus to Patron who assured its fate and…

Publication

(667 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] Publication (ἔκδοσις/ ékdosis) describes the act by means of which an author in Antiquity released his work to the public. The common interpretation (van Groningen) limited the meaning of ἔκδοσις to entirely private transmission by authors themselves, who would make their works available to anybody who might wish to become acquainted with them. This view has been abandoned for good reasons [1. 60f.]. Some evidence in Porphyrius, Galen and Quintilian suggests rather interpreting the verb ἐκδοῦναι ( ekdoûnai) in the sense of 'making public, publishing'. The…

Themista

(100 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Θεμίστα; Themísta). One of the women philosophers of the Epicurean School; at the beginning of the 4th cent. BC the wife of Leonteus [2] (Diog. Laert. 10,5,25); they had a son called Epicurus (Diog. Laert. 10,26). Cicero praises T.'s 'wisdom' ( sapientia) and names her as the author of numerous writings ( tanta volumina, Cic. Pis. 63). Epicurus addressed a number of letters (Excerpt: Diog. Laert. 10,5 = fr. 125 Usener) and a work Neocles to T. (Νεοκλῆς πρὸς Θεμίστα; Diog. Laert. 10,28) to her. Nothing of her work survives. Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography M. Erler, i…
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