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Antunnacum

(175 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] The modern Andernach; crossing-point of important long-distance routes (CIL XVII 2,675; Amm. Marc. 18,2,4) and the Rhine valley road from  Mogontiacum to  Colonia Agrippinensis; near the Roman cohort fort on the ‘Hügelchen’, already manned in the 1st cent. AD, it was a   vicus

Helvecones

(64 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Aside from the  Harii, Manimi, Halisiones and Nahanarvali, a powerful partial tribe of the Vandali-Lugii (Tac. Germ. 43,2); probably identical to the Elouaíōnes (Ἐλουαίωνες, Ptol. 2,11,9), although they do not have the addition Loûg[i]oi (Λοῦγ[ι]οι) and their location is pinpointed as between Rhoutíkleioi (Ῥουτίκλειοι) and Burgundiones (Βουργοῦντες). In this case they would be the most northerly Lugii. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)

Boiohaemum

(76 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] ‘Homeland of the Boii’, now Bohemia (sources: Str. 7,1,3; Vell. Pat. 2,109,5; Tac. Germ. 28,2). Although widely abandoned by the Celtic  Boii around 60 BC (Caes. Gall. 1,5,4; cf. Str. 7,1,5; Plin. HN 3,146 deserta Boiorum) and occupied by the  Marcomanni shortly before the end of that cent., the region retained their name. That it gav…

Albis

(145 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] The Elbe (never the Alb [3], despite [1]) has its source according to Tac. Germ. 41,2 [2. 242 f.] in the territory of the  Hermunduri, according to Ptol. 2,11,1 in the Sudeten, according to Cass. Dio 55,1,3 correctly in the ‘Vandal Mountains’ (Riesengebirge / Krkonoše). Known by the Romans since  Caesar, reached by  Drusus and  Tiberius in 9 and 5 BC, soon crossed by L.  Domitius Ahenobarbus, it was to have become the Germanic border of Rome -- a plan that failed. Therefore known to Tac. (Germ. 41,4) only by ‘hearsay’ ( nunc tantum auditur). Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography 1 R. Much, s. v. A., in: RGA 1, 21973, 129 f. 2 G. Perl, Tac. Germ. (trans. and comm.), 1990 3 J. Straub, Alba = Elbe oder Alb?, in: Regeneratio Imperii, 1972, 418-442. K.-P. Johne, Die Elbe als Ziel röm. Expansion, Sitzber. Akad. Wiss. DDR 1982, no. 15/G, 37-44 TIR M 33, 20.

Cusus

(73 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] River, eastern or western border of the kingdom of Quadian Vannius founded in AD 19 inter Marum (March) et Cusum (Tac. Ann. 2,63,6), mostly identified with the Duria, i.e. with Hron (Gran), Ipel' (Eipel) or -- archaeologically the most probable -- Váh (Waag [1. 186104]). Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography 1 H.-W. Böhme, Arch. Zeugnisse zur Gesch. der Markomannenkriege, in: JRGZ 22, 1975, 153-217. TIR M 33,35f. G. Neumann, s.v. C., RGA 5, 112f. Ipel';

Iuvavum

(426 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pannonia | Raeti, Raetia (modern Salzburg). In the territory of the Alauni the developing Roman site of I. (etymology disputed) on the left bank of the Salzach replaced the Celtic hill settlements on the Rainberg, the Festungsberg and the Kapuzinerberg in the later years of Augustus' reign (beginning 1st cent. AD). I. was built at the junction of the northern road along the crest of the Alps from Bregenz (Brigantium) and the long distance road from Aquileia leading over the Radstädter Tauernpass, and was raised to the status of mu…

Durnomagus

(69 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] The modern Dormagen. Late Flavian alae fort (3.3 ha) between Cologne and Neuss. Second construction phase in the mid 2nd cent. AD, probably the ala Noricorum (CIL XIII 8523f.); burnt down c. 200, and in c. 275 very briefly occupied. In the north-eastern corner was a reoccupation fort from late antiquity. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography M. Gechter, Das röm. Kavallerielager Dormagen, in: Arch. im Rheinland 1994, 1995, 85-87.

Heruli

(481 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Seafaring East Germanic tribe [1], which at the beginning of the 3rd cent. AD was allegedly driven out of Scandinavia by the Danes and split into East and West Heruli. The latter attacked the Romans at the Lower Rhine in 287, were defeated and repeatedly attacked Roman territory from the Dutch-Frisian coast to southern Spain (esp. 456/459). Threatened by the  Franci, they made an effort in 476 to gain the friendship of the  Visigoths. At the beginning of the 6th cent. they are no longer attested. From their home by the Sea of Azov, the much stronger East H. advance…

Herminones

(135 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] H.,  Ingaevones and  Istaevones are Germanic names for the original Germanic tribes traced back to the three sons of Mannus in the ancient mythological ethnogony of the Germans, based on an indigenous core, (Mannus genealogy) that was probably introduced to ancient literature by Posidonius and was gradually expanded under the influence of the Roman discovery of the north (Mela 3,32; Plin. HN 4,99f.; Tac. Germ. 2,2). Ethnically, spatially and socially the myth remains without conte…

Arenacium

(79 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt According to It. Ant. 254,3 and Tab. Peut. 2,4 (H)arenatio, presumably today's Kleve-Rindern. In AD 70/1 winter quarters of the legio X Gemina in the territory of the  Batavi (Tac. Hist. 5,20,1). The auxiliaries' fort in Kleve has not yet been found. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography J. Seibert, s. v. A., RGA 1, 21973, 399 H. G. Horn, Kleve-Rindern, in: Id. (ed.), Die Römer in Nordrhein-Westfalen, 1987, 458.

Abusina

(146 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Modern Eining. Tab. Peut. 4,3 f. Arusena, the modern river Abens. From AD 79/81 cohort fort ( castellum; 1.8 hectares) at the crossing of the Danube. Reduced size fort from about AD 300; the   vicus of the middle imperial period relocated into the fort: its northern extension perhaps a horreum from the second half of the 4th cent. AD. In the field named ‘Unterfeld’ remains of an ephemeral camp ( legio III Italica) from about AD 172/179.  Horrea;  Cohors;  Castellum Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography A. Faber, Die südgallische Terra Sigilata aus Kastell und …

Aestii

(172 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] The Aestiorum gentes, Baltic tribes, settled in the region east of the Vistula up to the Western Dvina (Tac. Germ. 45,2: ‘coastal dwellers to the right of the Suebian sea’; in tradition and looks related to the  Suebi, but closer to the  Britanni in language). This ethnic name which etymologically might relate to the river of the name Aistà in the Vilkabikis district was after all possibly Germanic [1]; furthermore, a connection with the Σουδινοί ( Soudinoí) of Ptol. 3,5,9 is postulated. The A. were peaceable (Iord. Get. 5,36) peasants, armed with cudgels…

Harii

(101 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Alongside the  Helvecones, Manimi, Halisiones and Nahanarvali, the H. are a powerful branch of the Vandali-Lugii tribe (Tac. Germ. 43,2). The identification with the Charini (Plin. HN 4,99) [1] is uncertain; the old conjecture of reading the hand-written alii (Tac. Germ. 43,4) as ( H) arii must be abandoned. Thus, the conclusions related to the supposed ferialis exercitus (‘army of ghosts’, ‘army of the dead’) of the H. are invalid. [2]. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography 1 G. Neumann, s.v. Charini, RGA 4, 371f. 2 A. A. Lund, Kritischer Forsch.-Ber. zur Germa…

Colonia Agrippinensis

(967 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | | Coloniae | Gallia/Gaul | Commerce | Legio | Limes | Limes | Pertinax | Rome | Rome | Batavian Revolt Present-day Cologne, principal city (Tac. Ann. 1,36,1; 37,2; 71,1) of the Ubii who moved from the Neuwieder Becken to settle in the area previously inhabited by the Eburones, following the deditio by Agrippa in 38 BC (Str. 4,3,4; Tac. Ann. 12,27,1; Germ. 28,4). Located on the gravel plain in the area today known as the old town (archaeology dates the oppidum Ubiorum to around the time of the birth of Christ). Oppidum ( Civ…

Noreia

(193 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Caesar Epithet of a mother goddess (possibly derived from a pre-Celtic tribe of the Nori), which was transferred to her shrines [1; 2. 156f.; 3. 240f.; 4]. A place called N. was situated 27 to 40 miles from Virunum in the direction of Ovilavia (Tab. Peut. 5,1). Several inscriptions are addressed to the goddess N. [4. 97f. ill. 4]. The urbs N. (Sempronius Asellio fr. 9 = schol. Bernensia to Verg. G. 3,474), where Papirius Carbo was defeated in 113 BC by the Cimbri, 1200 stadia from Aquileia (Str. 5,1,8…

Carnuntum

(681 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Commerce | Legio | Legio | Limes | Pannonia Important Roman base and settlement on the Danube at the intersection of the amber trade route (running from Aquileia through the March valley to the Baltic Sea) and the road along the Danube valley, modern Petronell and Bad Deutsch-Altenburg. Its Celtic name which can be linked with the neighbouring tribe of the Carni (e.g. Old Iranian carn‘stone mount’) indicates a (as yet unverified) pre-Roman settlement. The locus Norici regni C., from where Tiberius set out agains…

Grinario

(105 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] (modern Köngen). Fort (2.4 ha) on the Augsburg-Mainz road probably founded around AD 90/95. In about 160 the unit was moved to Lorch but the old camp probably still served as a base for supplies. The vicus G. (CIL XIII 11726f.; Tab. Peut. 4,1) that was c. 20 ha. in size flourished to around the middle of the 3rd cent. and belonged to the civitas Sumelocennensis (modern Rottenburg; CIL XIII 6384; 11727). Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography C. Unz, G., 1982 M. Luik, F. Reutti, Der Römerpark in Köngen, 1988 D. Planck, Neues zum röm. Vicus G.-Köngen, in: Arch. A…

Burii

(133 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] East Germanic people, lived as part of the  Lugii, but linguistically and culturally close to the  Suebi, settled with the Marsigni, Cotini and Osi north of the Marcomanni and Quadi up to the source of the Vistula (Tac. Germ. 43,1; Ptol. 2,11,10). In the wars against the Dacians enemies of Rome (illustration of battle scenes on the monument at Adamclisi), in the war against the Marcomanni on the side of Rome, they seceded from Rome because of the Peace of Commodus and around AD 182 were crushed (CIL III 5937) or may have settled in Spain [1]. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliogr…

Angli(i).

(115 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] According to Tac. Germ. 40,2, a Germanic tribe who, together with the Aviones, Reudigni, Varini, Eudoses, Suardones and Nuithones worshipped  Nerthus; it lived (against Ptol. 2,11,8: on the middle reaches of the Elbe) between Saxony and Jutland in Angulus (modern Angeln) in Schleswig-Holstein (Beda, Hist. eccl. 1,15). Joined at times with the  Suebi, the A. broke away from them under king Offa; most of them made the sea crossing directly to the island of  Britannia, from where Rom…

Lauriacum

(594 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | Legio | Pannonia Settlement and legionary camp in Noricum, modern Enns-Lorch in Upper Austria. The region at the confluence of the rivers Enns and Danube was touched by all of the important communication routes in Noricum. Iron from Noricum was traded through the Enns valley, and salt along the river Traun; the Aist valley led to the Bohemian Moldau region. The existence of an oppidum, postulated (with little justification) from the supposedly Celtic name, could not be verified. The assumption …
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