Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Bräu, H. H." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Bräu, H. H." )' returned 16 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

T̲h̲aʿlaba

(250 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H.H.
, a common old Arab proper name (more rarely T̲h̲aʿlab) and eponym of a number of subdivisions of the larger tribal divisions of ancient Arabia. Thus we have the T̲h̲aʿlaba b. ʿUḳāba of the great tribe of Bakr b. Wāʾil (Yamāma as far as Baḥrayn); the T̲h̲aʿlaba b. Saʿd b. D̲h̲ubyān of the tribe of G̲h̲aṭafān in the Nafūd region; the T̲h̲aʿlaba b. Yarbūʿ of the tribe of Tamīm; the T̲h̲aʿālib Ṭayyiʾ clans of the Ṭayyiʾ [ q.v.]. A T̲h̲aʿlaba b. ʿAmr b. Mud̲j̲ālid is mentioned as the first phylarch of the G̲h̲assānid dynasty [see g̲h̲assān ]. The “Roman Arabs of the house…

T̲h̲amūd

(562 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, the name of one of those old Arabian peoples, which like the ʿĀd, Iram (Aram), Wibār (Jobaritae?) had disappeared some time before the coming of the Prophet. A series of older references, not of Arabian origin, confirm the historical existence of the name and people of T̲h̲amūd. Thus the inscription of Sargon of the year 715 b. c. mentions the Tamud among the people of eastern and central Arabia subjected by the Assyrians. We also find the Thamudaei, Thamudenes mentioned in Aristo, Ptolemy, and Pliny. The latter mentions as settlements of the Thamuda…

al-Zafayān

(100 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, nickname of the rad̲j̲az poet ʿAṭāʾ b. Usaid Abu ’l-Miḳāl (according to another reading: Miḳdām). He belonged to the Banū ʿUwāfa, a branch of the tribe of Saʿd b. Zaid Manāt b. Tamīm, whence he was known as al-Saʿdī or al-Tamīmī. It is clear from one of his poems that he went through the rising of Abū Fudaik (73 = 692) and was roughly a contemporary of al-ʿAd̲j̲d̲j̲ād̲j̲. (H. H. Bräu) Bibliography A few quoted fragments of his urd̲j̲ūza’s from a defective copy of the Dīwān, ed. by Ahlwardt in Sammlungen alter arab. Dichter, Berlin 1903, vol. ii.

T̲h̲aʿlaba

(232 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, a common old Arab proper name (more rarely T̲h̲aʿlab) and eponym of a number of subdivisions of the larger tribal divisions of ancient Arabia. Thus we have the T̲h̲aʿlaba b. ʿUḳāba of the great tribe of Bakr b. Wāʾil (Yamāma as far as Baḥrain); the T̲h̲aʿlaba b. Saʿd b. Ḏh̲ubyān of the tribe of G̲h̲aṭafān in the Nefūd region; the T̲h̲aʿlaba b. Yarbūʿ of the tribe of Tamīm; the T̲h̲aʿālib Ṭaiy clans of the Ṭaiy [q.v.]. A T̲h̲aʿlaba b. ʿAmr b. Mud̲j̲ālid is mentioned as the first plylarch of the…

Maʿadd

(364 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, a collective name for certain Arab tribes, in the traditional usage for those of North Arabian origin (Muḍar and Rabīʿa) in contrast to the Yemen tribes. This contrast said to be inherent in the name Maʿadd seems already to be found frequently in the early poets, always presuming the genuineness of the passages in question. Thus in a verse of Imru ’l-Ḳais (Ahlwardt, N°. 41, l. 5) the term Maʿadd is used apparently in the sense of excluding the ʿIbād, Ṭaiy and Kinda, and in Nābig̲h̲a (Ahlwardt,…

Ṭasm

(465 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
b. Lūd̲h̲ b. Sām b. Nūḥ, a legendary tribe of the prehistoric period of the Arabs, closely connected by descent, dwellingplace (in al-Yamāma), conditions of life (agriculturists and cattle-breeders) and history with the Ḏj̲adīs [q. v.] (with whom they are always numbered) b. Ḥat̲h̲ir b. Iram b. Sām b. Nūḥ. The story, frequently mentioned in Arabic literature, of the ¶ fall of the two sister-tribes is in its main outlines as follows: They were at one time under the tyranny of a Ṭasmī named ʿAmlīḳ (or ʿAmlūḳ). Appealed to in a matrimonial dispute of a Ḏj̲…

Laila ’l-Ak̲h̲yalīya

(228 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, an Arab poetess, daughter of ʿAbdallāh b. al-Raḥḥāl(a) b. Kaʿb b. Muʿāwiya of the tribe of ʿUḳail b. Kaʿb. She got her name from the fact that her father — according to other traditions one of her ancestors Kaʿb or Muʿāwiya — was known as al-Ak̲h̲yal (= “the falcon”); perhaps it was a common name in her family and the phrase naḥnu ’l-ak̲h̲āʾilu in her verses glorifying her family may refer to this ( Ag̲h̲ānī, x. 80; Ḥamāsa, p. 711). Laila is usually mentioned in connection with her fellow-tribesman Tawöa b. Ḥumaiyir al-Ḵh̲afād̲j̲ī; fragments of her laments for him are preserved in the Kitāb al-A…

Taʾabbaṭa S̲h̲arran

(362 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, a nickname of the old Arab poet and Beduin hero, famed in legend, T̲h̲ābit b. Ḏj̲ābir b. Sufyān of the tribe of Fahm. Various explanations of it are given by the sources: “he carried mischief under his arm”, namely a sword, a knife ( ḥamāsa), a ram which proved to be a g̲h̲ūl. or a skin full of poisonous snakes ( Ag̲h̲ānī). His mother was according to one statement (in Fresnel) a negress, according to the Ag̲h̲ānī a woman of the Fahm tribe called Amīna, who afterwards married the Hud̲h̲ailī Abū Kabīr, who sought to take his step-son’s life. Taʿabbaṭa S̲h̲arrān was thro…

Mad̲h̲ḥid̲j̲

(180 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, an Arab tribe of Yemen origin, traced by the genealogists to Mālik b. Udad, who is said to be descended in the fourth generation from Ḳaḥtān and to have received his name Mad̲h̲ḥid̲j̲ from a hill of this name on which he and his brother Ṭaiy were born. His sons are said to have been: Saʿd al-ʿAs̲h̲īra, Ḏj̲ald, Yuḥābir called Murād, and Zaid called ʿAnz. The Mad̲h̲ḥid̲j̲ whose tribal lands are said to have lain near Tard̲j̲ “on the road to Yemen” (Yāḳūt, s. v.) and whose brother tribes were Ḵh̲…

al-Ḳuṭāmī

(278 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, epithet (“vulture-like”) of the Arab poet ʿUmair b. S̲h̲uyaim b. ʿAmr of the clan of Taim b. Usāma of the Tag̲h̲lib, a contemporary and fellow-tribesman of the poet al-Ak̲h̲ṭal and like the latter played a part in the feuds which raged in the second half of the first century a. h. between the tribes of Tag̲h̲lib and the Ḳais ʿAilān. His own experiences in battle and the glorification of the exploits of his tribe in war form the main themes of his poems. In contrast to al-Ak̲h̲ṭal however he does justice to his opponents, while venting particul…

ʿUrwa

(258 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
b. al-Ward b. Ḥābis of the tribe of ʿAbs, an old Arab poet. His father, whose fame was sung by ʿAntara, played a part in the Dāḥis war. His mother belonged to the less esteemed Banū Nahd, a branch of the Ḳuḍā’a (cf. Wüstenfeld, Tab., i. 17; allusions to them in poems ix., xix., xx.). He lived, as is expressly stated, in the Ḏj̲āhilīya. But his allusions to individuals who survived into the time of Muḥammad, like ʿĀmir b. Ṭufail (schol. on i. 1) show that he must have flourished just before the coming of the Prophet. His poems and the anec…

Umaiya

(891 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
b. Abi ’l-Ṣalt, an Arab poet of the tribe of T̲h̲aḳīf, lived in Ṭāʾif, the son of Abu ’l-Ṣalt ʿAbd Allāh and Ruḳaiya bint ʿAbd S̲h̲ams b. ʿAbd Manāf, grandson of Abū Sufyān, cousin of the ʿUtba and S̲h̲aiba who were killed at Badr and closely related to the Ḳurais̲h̲ patrician families of Mecca. A lament on the Ḳurais̲h̲ who fell at Badr, preserved by Ibn His̲h̲ām, p. 531 sqq., shows that he was still alive in 624 a. d. According to tradition, he died in 8 or 9 a. h. Traditions differ regarding his attitude to the Prophet and to Islām. But the statement that he was not in personal to…

Ṭaiy

(609 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, a tribe in early Arabia of Yamanite origin. According to the genealogists its ancestor, Ḏj̲ulhuma b. Udad, with the surname of Ṭaiy, was a descendant of Ḳaḥṭān and a brother of Mad̲h̲ḥid̲j̲ and Murra, the ancestor of the large tribe of Kinda. Originally they were at home in that part of the South-Arabian Ḏj̲ōf in which Ḥunaka was situated, on the way between Ṣanʿāʾ and Mecca. Ṭaiy, as well as Azd and other South-arabian tribes, joined the migration which tradition connects with the break of th…

T̲h̲aʿlaba

(247 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H. H.
, vieux nom propre arabe (plus rarement T̲h̲aʿlab) éponyme de nombre de fractions à l’intérieur des grandes tribus d’Arabie ancienne. Ainsi, les T̲h̲aʿlaba b. ʿUḳāba de la grande tribu Bakr b. Wāʾil (Yamāma jusqu’au Baḥrayn); T̲h̲aʿlaba b. Saʿd b. Ḏh̲ubyān de G̲h̲aṭafān dans la région du Nafūd; T̲h̲aʿlaba b. Yarbūʿ de la tribu Tamīm; les clans T̲h̲aʿālib Ṭayyiʾ des Ṭayyiʾ [ q.v.]. Un T̲h̲aʿlaba b. ʿAmr b. Mud̲j̲ālid est mentionné comme premier phylarque de la dynastie G̲h̲assānide [voir G̲h̲assān]. Les «Arabes Romains de la maison de T̲h̲aʿlaba» mentionnés par Joshua Styl…

al-Ḳuṭāmī

(400 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H.H. | Pellat, Ch.
(“the falcon”), the name of several poets (including one from Ḍubayʿa b. Rabīʿa and another from Kalb; see al-Āmidī, Muk̲h̲talif , 166); the best-known of these was ʿumayr b. s̲h̲uyaym b. ʿamr , who probably came from the D̲j̲us̲h̲am b. Bakr of Tag̲h̲lib (see Ibn al-Kalbī-Caskel, Register , 474). On account of one of his verses, he was also given the name of Ṣarīʿ al-G̲h̲awānī “the one felled by beautiful maidens”. Like his fellow-tribesman and maternal uncle (?) al-Ak̲h̲ṭal [ q.v.], he was involved in the quarrels of the second half of the 1st/7th century between the Tag̲h…

al-Ḳuṭāmī

(383 words)

Author(s): Bräu, H.H. | Pellat, Ch.
«le Faucon», surnom de plusieurs poètes (dont un des Ḍubayʿa b. Rabīʿa et un autre des Kalb; voir al-Āmidī, Muk̲h̲talif, 166), parmi lesquels le plus connu est ʿUmayr b. S̲h̲uyaym b. ʿAmr qui appartenait probablement aux Ḏj̲us̲h̲am b. Bakr, des Tag̲h̲lib (voir Ibn al-Kalbī-Caskel, Register, 474). A cause d’un de ses vers, il avait été surnommé également Ṣarīʿ al-G̲h̲awām «la victime des belles ». Comme son contribule et oncle maternel(?) al-Ak̲h̲ṭal [ q.v.], il fut impliqué dans les querelles qui opposèrent, au cours de la seconde moitié du Ier/VIIe siècle, les Tag̲h̲lib aux Ḳays ʿ…