Encyclopaedia of Islam, First Edition (1913-1936)

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Iyād
(1,148 words)

, a great Arab tribe belonging to the Maʿaddī (Ismāʿīlī) group. Their genealogy is Iyād b. Nizār b. Maʿadd b. ʿAdnān. The Rabīʿa, Anmār and Muḍar were consanguineous tribes of the Iyād. A section of the Iyād professed Christianity. The poet Abū Dūʾād, famous for his descriptions of the horse, and the celebrated Ḳuss b. Sāʿida were members of the Iyād.

At first they dwelt in Tihāmn up to the borders of Nad̲j̲rān [q. v.]. In the first half of the iiird century they emigrated in large bodies to Eastern ʿIrāḳ and thence to Mesopotamia. Among their settlements were: Anbār (they …

Cite this page
Schleifer, J., “Iyād”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, First Edition (1913-1936), Edited by M. Th. Houtsma, T.W. Arnold, R. Basset, R. Hartmann. Consulted online on 26 November 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2214-871X_ei1_SIM_3276>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004082656, 1913-1936



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