Encyclopaedia of Islam, First Edition (1913-1936)

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Ḥod̲j̲aila
(178 words)

, a village in South Arabia, at the foot of Ḥarāz [q. v.] about 1900 feet above the sea level, a border village of the Tihāma. It belongs to the ḳaḍā of Manāk̲h̲a [q. v.] and to the mudīrlik of Mitwaḥ on Ḏj̲ebel Saʿfān (Ḥarāz). It has a market and Turkish barracks. The low cottages (arwās̲h̲) of the village are built of large unhewn stones without mortar. The people of Ḥod̲j̲aila are of a chestnut brown colour and resemble gipsies; they belong some to the tribe of Ḵh̲awlī, others to the Ziyādinī. Around the village many partridges are found whence its name. Moreover a kind of wild duck called k̲h̲ulal

Cite this page
Schleifer, J., “Ḥod̲j̲aila”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, First Edition (1913-1936), Edited by M. Th. Houtsma, T.W. Arnold, R. Basset, R. Hartmann. Consulted online on 01 December 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2214-871X_ei1_SIM_2840>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004082656, 1913-1936



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