Brill’s New Pauly

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Wreath, Garland
(712 words)

[German version]

(στέφανος/stéphanos, στεφάνη/stephánē, Lat. corolla, corona). Wreaths and garlands were formed out of flowers, leaves and branches, or were reproduced (out of bronze, silver and gold; cf. e.g. [1]) in their image. They were a constituent part of culture and everyday life in Greece and Rome: a symbol of consecration, honouring and decoration for people and gods. Wearing a wreath was a mark of distinction (cf. Apul. Met. 11,24.4) and it was reprehensible to attack a person wearing one (cf. Aristoph. Plut. 21). Wreaths have been worn from time immemorial (Tert…

Cite this page
Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg), “Wreath, Garland”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 24 May 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e622060>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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