Brill’s New Pauly

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Headgear
(427 words)

[German version]

plays only a minor role in myth and history. One case in point is Hades' helmet of invisibility which Athena uses (κυνέη Ἄϊδος/kynéē Áïdos, Hom. Il. 5,844 f.) and then hands to  Perseus [1].  Midas hides his donkey ears under a turban ( Tiara), Ov. Met. 11,180 f. A hat ( pilleus ) was taken from  Lucumo ( Tarquinius [11] Priscus) by an eagle and then brought back, which was seen as a positive omen for the future, Liv. 1,34; a wind blows  Alexander [4] the Great's  kausia off his head (Arr. Anab. 7,22,2 f.).

Greek and Roman men went bareheaded in everyday life, unless …

Cite this page
Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg), “Headgear”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 11 December 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e12223360>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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