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Cothurnus
(248 words)

[German version]

(ὁ κόθορνος; ho kóthornos, cot[h]urnus). The Greek cothurnus was a high-shafted soft leather boot that fitted tightly to the leg and foot (and, by extension, was used as a synonym for an adaptable person in Xen. Hell. 2,3,30-31). It was wrapped with bands or tied at an opening at the front. The cothurnus is mentioned as women's footwear (Aristoph. Eccl. 341-346; Lys. 657), but was worn in particular by elegant youths at a symposium and  komos. It was the preferred footwear of Hermes, Diomedes, Odysseus, Theseus and Iolaus, who wore it as a walking-shoe; …

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Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg), “Cothurnus”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 16 July 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e621400>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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