Brill’s New Pauly

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Busts
(652 words)

[German version]

From the Renaissance, the word bust (from Italian busto) refers to a three-dimensional free-standing human image, which is restricted to head and chest ( Portrait). There is no ancient technical term, because busts were predominantly classified as portraits (imagines). The term  bustum, on the other hand, meant gravesite, which in Italic cultures was marked by a  cippus or a stele, contouring a human head; in some instances as early as the 6th cent., but more commonly by the 4th and 3rd cents. BC, these developed into rudimentary colu…

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Neudecker, Richard (Rome), “Busts”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 18 February 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e221240>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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