Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Xylicces

(45 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Ξυλικκεῖς; Xylikkeîs). A - possibly negroid - people which probably lived to the north of the Ahaggar Massif (in the Sahara)  (Ptol. 4,6,23: Ξ. Αἰθίοπες). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography J. Desanges, Catalogue des tribus africaines, 1962, 241  H. Treidler, s. v. Ξ., RE 9 A, 2161-2163.

Xyline

(102 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Brandt, Hartwin (Chemnitz)
(Ξυλίνη; Xylínē). [German version] [1] Coastal town in Colchis Coastal town in Colchis between the mouths of the Archabis (modern Arhavi) and the Cissa (modern Kise; Ptol. 5,6,6), not locatable more precisely. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography H. Treidler, s. v. X., in: RE 9 A, 2163 f. [German version] [2] Settlement in Pisidia to the north of Termessus [1] Settlement in Pisidia to the north of Termessus [1], to the south of Cormasa (not located with certainty: [1. 67]); precise location unclear. Cn. Manlius [I 24] Vulso stayed there in 189 BC (Liv. 38,15,7). Bran…

Xylinepolis

(85 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] One of Alexander [4] the Great's settlements (Plin. HN 6,26,96; perhaps following Onesicritus), where his fleet set off under Nearchus [2] on its coastal voyage westwards; according to [2] identical with Ἀλεξάνδρου λιμήν/ Alexándrou limḗn ('Alexander's port') in Arr. Ind. 21,10 where the western branch of the Indus flows into the Arabian Sea [1. 127]. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography 1 J. André, J. Filliozat (ed.), Pline l'ancien, Histoire naturelle. Livre VI, 2e partie, 1980 (with French transl. and comm.) 2 H. Treidler, s. v. X., RE 9 A, 2164-2172.

Xylophoria

(103 words)

Author(s): Colpe, Carsten (Berlin)
[German version] (by analogy with plur., ἡ τῶν ξυλοφορίων ἑορτή/ hē tôn xylophoríōn heortḗ). The Jewish '(festival of) wood-carrying'. Once a year (middle of August/beginning of September) it celebrated, possibly from as early as the end of the 5th cent. BC (Neh 10,35; 13,31) and probably until the beginning of the 2nd cent. AD (Taan. 4,4: Simon ben Azzai, c. AD 110), the fetching of wood, which was, or - after the destruction of the Temple (III.) - would had been, necessary to maintain the eternal fire which burned for the morning and evening burnt sacrifices (Jos. BI 2,17,6). Colpe, Cars…

Xylopolis

(23 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Ξυλόπολις; Xylopolis). Settlement at Mygdonia [1] in Macedonia (Plin. HN. 4,35; Ptol. 3,13,36), not located. Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)

Xyniae

(149 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Ξυνίαι; Xyníai). City in Achaea Phthiotis in western Othrys, about 4 km southwest of modern X. (formerly Dauklí). X. lay 74 m above the southeastern shore of Lake Xynias and controlled the pass on the road from Lamia [2] to Thaumaci. X. was Aetolian from the middle of the 3rd cent. BC (at this time there was a definition of borders with the neighbouring city of Melitaea: IG IX 2, p. XI, no. 3), but at the end of the 3rd cent., X. was Macedonian. In 198 BC, after a massacre of its …

Xynias

(58 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Ξυνιάς; Xynías). Lake in a caldera of the Othrys (approximately 5  km × 7 km in size, up to 5 m in depth), named after the city of Xyniae on its southeastern shore, drained to the north, called Ezeros in the Middle Ages, and today dried up. Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) Bibliography F. Stählin, Das hellenische Thessalien, 1924, 159 f.

Xypete

(91 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Ξυπέτη; Xypétē). Attic asty deme of the Cecropis phyle, from 307/6 until 201 BC of the Demetrias [2] phyle, seven bouleutaí; with Peiraeus, Phalerum and Thymaetadae, X. formed the cult federation of the tetrákōmoi with a common Herakleion at Peiraeus. Its location between this sanctuary and Phalerum at modern Kallithea-Moschato is certain. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography E. Meyer, s. v. X., RE 9 A, 2178-2182  Traill, Attica, 11, 50, 67, 112 No. 142, Table 7, 12  J. S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 5, 13, 14, 24, 115, 134  Whitehead, Index s. v. X.

Xystis

(115 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Ξυστίς/ Xystís). City in northwestern Caria (Cares IV.; Steph. Byz. s. v. Ξ.), like Orthosia [1], Euhippe (at modern Dalama), Coscinus or Coscina (at modern Mount Arı near Dalama) and other places (Plin. HN. 5,109) between the Harpasus [1] and the Marsyas [4], left-bank tributaries of the Maeander [2], modern Körteke. Archaeology: a mountain fortress, presumably of the Leleges (cf. Str 7,7,2; 13,1,59), with pre-Classical and Mediaeval walling. Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg) Bibliography R. J. A. Talbert, Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, 2000, 61 G 3  E…

Xystos

(187 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (ξυστός/ xystós; Latin xystus). In Roman Antiquity a walkway ( ambulatio) or a terrace, usually an element of a hortus (garden) and hence part of a villa. According to Vitr. 5,11,4 such a xystus consisted of an unroofed path edged by plane trees. In a Greek gymnasiun, the original context of a xystus (in evidence there since the 5th cent. BC), in contrast, a covered running track was meant. There is disagreement about the precise definition of a xystus in Roman architecture; sometimes (Varro Men. 162; Cic. Att. 1,4,2) it is only the course of a sp…

Xystus

(510 words)

Author(s): Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg)
[German version] [1] (presumed) bishop of Rome 117-125 (Ξύστος/ Xýstos). In sixth place (as successor to an Alexander) in his list of sources of the Apostolic tradition ( traditio apostolica) in Rome, Iren. Adversus haereses 3,3 mentions a X., who may therefore have been considered the most important member of the Christian community in Rome in the first half of the 2nd cent. This list was later understood as a list of bishops and X. was placed as Sixtus I with a period in office from 117 to 125. Petrus [1] D Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg) Bibliography E. Caspar, Geschichte des Papsttums,…