Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Phalantus

(123 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Φάλανθος/ Phálanthos; Lat. Phalant[h]us). Mythological founder of Taranto (Taras; Antiochus of Syracuse FGrH 555 F 13; Ephorus FGrH 70 F 216; Paus. 10,10,6-8 and elsewhere). According to Antiochus l.c., P. founded Taranto as a result of the instruction by the oracle of Delphi after an uprising by the Parthenians, led by him, against Sparta during the first Messenian War had failed; according to Ephorus l.c., the Spartans persuaded the Parthenians to emigrate. However, according to Paus. l.c., Taranto already existed. Apart from that, Paus. 10,13,3 report…

Phalanx

(745 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle)
(φάλαγξ; phálanx). [German version] I. The phalanx of hoplites As early as in Homer the word phalanx is used to describe a battle-line or a lined-up army section (cf. e.g. Hom. Il. 11,214f.; 13,126f., cf. 16,215-217). Phalanx is used, like στίξ ( stíx, '(battle-)rank'), almost always in the plural, phálanges; after Homer the expression is not used again until Xenophon (Xen. An. 1,8,17; 6,5,27; Xen. Cyr. 1,6,43; Xen. Hell. 4,3,18; 6,5,18). Today it is recognised that by the Homeric period (8th cent. BC) mass fighting was already decisive; the phalanx as a uniformly equipped and centr…

Phalara

(83 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Natural catastrophes (τὰ Φάλαρα; tà Phálara). Town of the Malieis, port serving Lamia [2] on the Malian Gulf, probably present-day Stilida. Destroyed by an earthquake in 426 BC (Str. 1,3,20); after its reconstruction, it was again an important harbour town (cf. Str. 9,5,13). Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) Bibliography E. Kirsten, s.v. P., RE 19, 1647  F. Stählin, Das hellenische Thessalien, 1924, 217f.  K. Braun, R. Scheer, s.v. P., in: Lauffer, Griechenland, 533.

Phalaris

(299 words)

Author(s): Patzek, Barbara (Wiesbaden)
[German version] (Φάλαρις; Phálaris). Tyrant of Acragas, son of Leodamas of Rhodes; ruled the city, which was founded c. 580 BC, from c. 570-555 BC. Aristotle (Pol. 5,10, 1310b 28) counts him among those tyrants who achieved power by virtue of their high official status ( ek tōn timôn). Elsewhere (Aristot. Rh. 2,20,1393b 5-8), Aristotle cites a fable of Stesichorus, according to which P. first held the office of a strategos with dictatorial powers ( stratēgós autokrátōr). According to Polyaenus, Strat. 5,1,1, on the other hand, P. seized power while treasurer during the…

Phalarium

(56 words)

Author(s): Falco, Giulia (Athens)
[German version] (Φαλάριον; Phalárion). Fortress (φρούριον; phroúrion) near Gela in Sicily, probably the fortification complex discovered on Monte Desusino (429 m high), founded in the 6th cent. BC by Phalaris. Here Agathocles [2] was encamped in 311 BC in the battle against the Carthagians (Diod. Sic. 19,108,2). Falco, Giulia (Athens) Bibliography BTCGI 7, 407f.; 10, 331-334.

Phalasarna

(307 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Crete (τὰ Φαλάσαρνα; tà Phalásarna). Port city in the NW of Crete (Str. 10,4,2; Plin. HN 4,59) with topographically striking, steep acropolis, present-day Koutri. Historical reports start with an alliance treaty concluded with the neighbouring polis Polyrrhenia as a result of mediation by Sparta at the beginning of the 3rd cent. BC [1. no. 1, pp. 179-181]. At the behest of the Romans, P. regained its previously lost autonomy from Cydonia (Pol. 22,1…

Phalces

(158 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Φάλκης; Phálkēs). Heraclid (Heraclidae), son of Temenus, brother of Cissus (Ceisus: Paus. 2,19,1), Cerynes, Agaeus (other sons of Temenus are mentioned in Apollod. 2,179) and Hyrnetho, father of Rhegnidas (Paus. 2,13,1). Out of envy of Hyrnetho and her husband Deïphontes, whom Temenus prefers to his sons, P. and his brothers (with the exception of the youngest: Agaeus) have their father attacked and killed while bathing (Nicolaus of Damascus FGrH 90 F 30; Diod.Sic. 7,13,1; Apollod…

Phaleas

(215 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover)
[German version] (Φαλέας; Phaléas) of Chalcedon. Greek thinker (5th cent. or 1st half of the 4th cent. BC) who concerned himself with polis structures but should probably not be regarded as one of the Sophists. On the basis of the little information that Aristotle [6] (Pol. 2,7,1266a 39-1267b 21; 1274b 9; cf. Diels/Kranz 39,1) provides in a polemical and perhaps distorted form, P. (neglecting warfare) developed a highly differentiated concept of the polis based on the idea - allegedly formulated by…

Phalerae

(5 words)

see Dona militaria

Phalerum

(319 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Φάληρον; Phálēron). Shallow bay to the east of Piraeus before the latter's expansion as the chief port of Athens (Hdt. 5,63; 5,85; 6,116; 8,66f.; 8,91ff.; 9,32; Paus. 1,1,2), modern Kallithea/Moschato/Palaia Phaliro. Also a large Attic asty-deme of the Aeantis phyle with 9 (13) bouleutaí. The location of the ancient centre of the deme is disputed [1; 2. 25ff.; 3; 5], the question of the ancient coastline [5; 8. 340] can be clarified only with geoscientific methods. In the 5th cent. BC the 'Phaleric Wall' connected Athens …

Phalerus

(115 words)

Author(s): Börm, Henning (Kiel)
[German version] (Φάληρος; Phálēros). A Greek hero by the name of P. appears in many and varied contexts and it is uncertain whether the reference is always to the same person: a P. becomes an Argonaut (Argonauts) (Apoll. Rhod. 1,96f.; Val. Fl. 4,654) at the wish of his father Alcon; he is the eponym of the Attic Phalerum, where an altar was dedicated to him (Paus. 1,1,4), and of Lower Italian Neapolis [2] (= Phaleron). Perhaps this Attic P. is identical with the supposed founder of Soli (Str. 14,6…

Phales

(4 words)

see Phallos

Phallus

(672 words)

Author(s): Scherf, Johannes (Tübingen)
[German version] (φαλλός/ phallós, Latin phallus; from a Proto-Indo-European root * bhel-, 'blow up', 'swell up'). As bearer of the beneficent power of procreation, the male member played an important role in religion and cult. Its connection with Dionysus is particularly close: Phallus processions can be found in the rural Dionysia (Aristoph. Ach. 241-276), where the phallus is personified as Phales, to whom the cultic song is addressed (Aristoph. Ach. 263; 276), and at the great Dionysia, where the membe…

Phanae

(168 words)

Author(s): Külzer, Andreas (Vienna)
(Φάναι; Phánai). [German version] [1] Southern tip of the island of Chios The c. 300 m high southern tip of the island of Chios (Thuc. 8,24,3; Str. 14,1,35; Steph. Byz. s.v. Φ.; Liv. 44,28,7; Ptol. 5,2,19), modern Akron Masticho. Külzer, Andreas (Vienna) [German version] [2] Port on the southwestern coast of Chios Port on the southwestern coast of Chios about 10 km from P. [1] (Str. 14,1,35), modern Káto Phana. Area famous for viticulture (Verg. G. 2,98 and Serv. Georg. z.St.); palm grove (Str. l.c.). In the bay of P. great fleets were harboured…

Phanagoria

(311 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pontos Euxeinos | Scythae | Commerce | Colonization | Patricius | Patricius (Φαναγόρεια; Phanagóreia). Port founded by Teos (Ps.-Scymn. 886f.) in the 1st half of the 6th cent. BC in the area of the Sindi (Ps.-Scyl. 72) (Hecat. FGrH 1 F 212; Colonisation IV.) on the Korokondamitis limne (Gulf of Taman) on the Asiatic coast of the Bosphorus [2], on the peninsula of Taman about 3 km south-west of modern Sennaja. As the Hypanis [2] in ancient times flowed with …

Phanes

(600 words)

Author(s): Maharam, Wolfram-Aslan (Gilching) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)
(Φάνης; Phánēs). [German version] [1] Primordial god of the Orphic cosmogony In Greek, 'the one who illuminates, enlightens, appears; the one who is (makes something) obvious' (OF frr. 56; 61; 109); the light-like (Nonnus, Dion. 9,141) and golden-winged (OF frr. 54; 78; 87,2) primordial god of the Orphic cosmogony (OF fr. 78; 86; World, creation of the). This cosmogony, recorded by a certain Hieronymus and Hellanicus (OF fr. 54), must be distinguished from that in the Hieroì Lógoi, an Orphic poem in 14 rhapsodies (OF testimonia 174; 196). P. was not the original name of …

Phanes stater

(251 words)

Author(s): Stumpf, Gerd (Munich)
[German version] Stater of natural elektron [3] c. 14.2 g in weight, minted after 630 BC presumably in Ephesus in Ionia, with a deer gazing rightwards on the obverse, above it a retrograde inscription in Milesian letters ΦΑΝΟΣ ΕΜΙ ΣΗΜΑ ('I am the sign/arms of Phanes') and on the reverse two textured engraved squares with a rectangular field between them. Of this stater as yet two examples are known (London, BM; Frankfurt am Main, Bundesbank; [1. 1f.]). Besides these two there are hitherto two triple st…

Phanias

(104 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] (Φανίας; Phanías). Epigrammatist, perhaps among the last (2nd-1st cent. BC?) of the Garland of Meleager (Anth. Pal. 4,1,54); also a grammatikós (lemma on 7,537). Among the eight poems of his to survive (including one erotic one: 12,31), minute accounts of work tools and everyday objects predominate; with these, P. emulated Leonidas [3] of Tarentum. The extremely rare Latinism δρύππα, 'ripe olive' (cf. Anth. Pal. 6,299,4), may reflect direct knowledge of the terminology of Italian agriculture. The form Phainías for the name (cf. lemma on 6,299 and 12,31) se…

Phano

(60 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Cologne)
[German version] (Φανώ; Phanṓ). Daughter of the hetaera Neaera [6] and Stephanus, first married to the Athenian Phrastor, then divorced. Then her father married her to the árchōn basileús Theogenes ([Dem.] Or. 59,79ff.). After a scandal because of her doubtful citizenship she was divorced from him as well. Engels, Johannes (Cologne) Bibliography Ch. Carey, Apollodoros Against Neaira [Demosthenes 59], 1992.

Phanocles

(325 words)

Author(s): Di Marco, Massimo (Fondi Latina)
[German version] (Φανοκλῆς; Phanoklȇs). Early Hellenistic elegist, author of a poem entitled Ἔρωτες ἢ καλοί ( Érōtes ḕ kaloí/'Amours, or the Fair Youths'; fr. 1-6 Powell) which recounted the homosexual liaisons of gods and mythical heroes. The poem resembled a register (Catalogue) similar to Hesiod’s Catalogue of Women (Hesiodus). P. is probably also influenced by the Leontion of Hermesianax, with whom he shares a penchant for placing adjectives and nouns forming a juncture before the caesura and at the end of the pentameter, respectively. The longest fragment (1 Powell) contai…
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