Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

Philaidae

(447 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) | Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
(Φιλαΐδαι; Philaïdai). [German version] [1] Attican deme P. was an Attic mesogeia deme of the Aigeis phyle with three bouleutaí on the east coast of Attica. The shrine of Artemis at Brauron was on its territory. Peisistratus [4] came from P. (Pl. Hipparch. 228b; Plut. Solon 10,2). It is unsubstantiated that Cleisthenes [2] did not therefore name the deme Brauron [4. 11 with fn. 30, 24 with fn. 83]. The location of the deme centre of P. to the west of the early Christian basilica of Brauron [1. 41; 2. 127] is hypothetical [3. 56]. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Traill, Attica, 41, 6…

Philammon

(224 words)

Author(s): Knorr, Thorsten (Hamburg) | Ameling, Walter (Jena)
(Φιλάμμων; Philámmōn). [German version] [1] Singer and lyrist Mythical singer and lyrist of Delphi, a son of Apollo (Pherecydes of Athens FGrH 3 F 120); his mother is variously given as Philonis (ibid.), Chione [2] (Ov. Met. 11,316f.) and Leuconoe [1] (Hyg. Fab. 161). His sons - for whom there are also other genealogical backgrounds - were Thamyris (Eur. Rhes. 916; 925) and Eumolpus (Theoc. 24,108). At Delphi, P. is said to have introduced choirs of virgins (Pherecydes loc. cit.) and choirs within the t…

Philanthropa

(151 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] (φιλάνθρωπα/ philánthrōpa, neuter? pl. 'philanthropic <decrees>'). Specific, publicly announced measures by the Ptolemaic kings on economic and/or political preferential treatment (e.g. tax reduction, amnesty) for the population of the kingdom or certain groups (see Ptolemaeus [9] VI. Philometor; Ptolemaeus [12] VIII. Euergetes II.). As a rule, the philanthropa's aim was to prevent unrest which was threatening or had already arisen, and of also increasing the favourable reception of the respective ruler. On inscriptions in Hell…

Philaretus

(367 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
(Φιλάρετος; Philáretos). [German version] [1] Greek writer on medicine Greek writer on medicine. A text which bears P.’s name and ultimately goes back to Galen’s theories about the pulse, is a Byzantine revision (from the 9th cent.?) of the text De pulsibus ad Antonium (= Gal. 19,629-642 K.) which was influenced by pneumat (Pneumatists). Whether or not P. was the author of the original text or the revised version, is a matter of controversy. A connection with Philagrius cannot be ruled out as his name is occasionally misrepresented in P.…

Philargyrius

(6 words)

see Iunius [III 2] Filagrius

Philastrius

(125 words)

Author(s): Heimgartner, Martin (Halle)
[German version] (mostly Filastrius or Filaster). After long journeying as an anti-heretical preacher (Gaudentius [5] of Brescia, Sermo 21), P. became bishop of Brixia (Brescia) before AD 381. He met Augustine between 383 and 387 (Aug. Epist. 222) and died on the 18th July of a year before 397. The surviving Diversarum hereseon liber on 156 heresies is based on Epiphanius [1] of Salamis ( Panárion) and Irenaeus [2] of Lyon ( Adversus haereses), and was used by Augustine (Augustinus) ( De haeresibus). Heresiology Heimgartner, Martin (Halle) Bibliography F. Heylen (ed.), Filastrii Epi…

Phileas

(199 words)

Author(s): Gärtner, Hans Armin (Heidelberg) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
(Φιλέας; Philéas). [German version] [1] Of Athens, Greek geographer, middle of the 5th cent. BC Greek geographer from Athens (cf. Marcianus, Epitome peripli Menippei 2 = GGM 1, 565; Avien. 43f.), middle of the 5th cent. BC. His 13 directly preserved fragments have not been edited (sources and contents: [1. 2134f.]). As probably the first Attic successor to the early Ionian periegesis (Periegetes), P., in his Description of the Earth (γῆς περίοδος/ gês períodos, Harpocr. 152,2), probably discussed the entire Mediterranean region, not only the coasts, as in a periplous

Philemon

(1,647 words)

Author(s): Junk, Tim (Kiel) | Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne) | Gärtner, Hans Armin (Heidelberg) | Damschen, Gregor (Halle/Saale) | Et al.
(Φιλήμων; Philḗmōn). [German version] [1] Husband of Baukis Husband of Baucis. Junk, Tim (Kiel) [German version] [2] Writer of the Attic New Comedy, c. 300 BC Son of Damon of Syracuse [1. test. 1, 11], became (before 307/6 BC; cf. [1. test. 15]) an Athenian citizen [1. test. 2-12. 15]. Important writer of Attic New Comedy with his stage debut several years before Menander [4] (before 328: [1. test. 2]); it is uncertain whether this somewhat earlier chronology or the different nature of his plays led to P. once being call…

Philetaerus

(662 words)

Author(s): Hidber, Thomas (Berne) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale)
(Φιλέταιρος; Philétairos). [German version] [1] Attic poet of the Middle Comedy, 4th cent. BC Attic poet of the Middle Comedy (1st half of 4th cent. BC), according to Dicaearchus, son of the comic poet Aristophanes [3] [1. test. 1; 2. 192], though this remains uncertain owing to some discrepancies in ancient tradition [3]. In the list of victors at the Lenaea, P. has two victories immediately after Anaxandrides and before Eubulus. Of the total of 21 pieces attributed to P. by the Suda [1. test. 1], the titles…

Philetas

(4 words)

see Philitas

Philhellenism

(1,070 words)

Author(s): Ferrary, Jean-Louis (Paris)
[German version] In the modern languages, the word philhellene ('lover of Greece or the Greeks') or philhellenism ('love for Greece or the Greeks') came into use at the time of the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829), when there was a wave of sympathy for the Greeks throughout Europe. A short time later (beginning in the 1850s) the word also came to be used by classical scholars such as Grote and Mommsen (see also Philhellenism). In Antiquity there was only the Greek adjective φιλέλλην/ philhéllēn ('loving of Greece or the Greeks'), which appeared regularly, although not ver…

Philhellenism

(2,540 words)

Author(s): Landfester, Manfred (Gießen RWG) | Lessenich, Rolf
Landfester, Manfred (Gießen RWG) [German version] I. Philhellenism in the Broader Sense (CT) The term Philhellenism is derived from Philhellenes ('Friends of the Greeks'; Greek: philhéllēnes). In the broader sense, it designates any cultural or political movement that admires the Greeks and Greece and feels itself connected to them; in the narrower sense, it denotes a Western European and American political and literary movement that supported the Greeks in the 19th cent. in their struggle for liberation from Turkish ru…

Philia

(4 words)

see Friendship

Philiadas

(126 words)

Author(s): Di Marco, Massimo (Fondi Latina)
[German version] (Φιλιάδας; Philiádas) of Megara. Steph. Byz. s.v. Θέσπεια ascribes to him an ἐπίγραμμα τῶν ἀναιρεθέντων ὑπὸ τῶν Περσῶν ('epigram on those who fell against the Persians') from which he quotes an elegiac distich (GVI no. 5 Peek = no. 23 Preger = FGE 289-290 = IEG II2 p. 193) lauding the bravery of the Thespians. The theory that this formed part of an Epitaphios carved on one of the five steles erected at Thermopylae (Str. 9,4,2) is probably without foundation [1; 2]. The hypothesis that P. authored vv. 773-782 (788) of the Theognidea (Theognis [1]) is also dubious [3]. Di Marco,…

Philicus

(114 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)
[German version] (Φίλικος; Phílikos) of Corcyra (Corfu). Poet and tragedian, priest of Dionysus at Alexandria in the reign of Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285-246 BC). Member of the Pleias, often confused with Philiscus [4] of Aegina (TrGF I 89; I 104 T1, T4). Nothing survives of the 24 tragedies attributed to him. A large section is preserved of a hymn to Demeter in stichic catalectic choriambic hexameters (SH 676-680). In it, Demeter is consoled for the loss of her daughter with the prospect of cultic honours at Eleusis and by the wit of the maiden Iambe (in direct speech). Zimmermann, Bernhar…

Phi (linguistics)

(205 words)

Author(s): Meiser, Gerhard (Halle/Saale)
[German version] In Greek, the letter Φ originally denotes a voiceless aspirated labial stop ph , which, in inherited words, can be traced back to PIE bh or - before a o i - to gwh (φέρω < * bher-e/o-; φόνος < * gwhón-o-; ὄφις < * 2o(n)gwhi- for Latin anguis, Sanskrit áhi-, Young Avestan. aži-?) [1. 297; 2. 84, 88]. As an 'additional character' to the earliest Greek alphabet (Alphabet C.) it is missing in the archaic alphabets of Crete, Thera and Melos; ΠΗ (Pi + Heta) [3. 35] appears for this if necessary. Its sound value in the Etruscan alphabet (Etruscan) is uncertain; cf. for instance Φ erse  Πε…

Philinne

(84 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] (Φιλίννη; Philínn ē). A papyrus fragment (PAmherst 11) contains three hexameters of a magical incantation (ἐπῳδή; epōidḗ) against headaches, attributed to a certain “P. of Thessaly”. This fragment is physically connected to another (PBerolinensis inv. 7504) from the same roll containing a magic spell by a Syrian woman from Gadara against burns of all sorts. Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) Bibliography 1 SH 900 2 PGM II2, p. 145 3 Pack, No. 1871 (with bibliography) 4 A. Henrichs, Zum Text einiger Zauberpapyri, in: ZPE 6, 1970, 204-209.

Philinus

(600 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Et al.
(Φιλῖνος; Philînos). [German version] [1] Athenian politician Athenian. P. proposed absorbing all thetai (thetes) into the hoplites ( hoplítai ) (Antiph. fr. 61 from the speech Katà Philînou). In 420/419 BC, he attempted to prevent a case brought against him for the improper use of public funds by inciting one Philocrates to raise a charge of accidental killing against the accuser immediately before the trial. Once the charge was accepted, P.' accuser was no longer permitted to enter any protected places, including places of justice ( nómima) (Antiph. 6,12; 21; 35f.). Schmitz, Winfrie…

Philip, acts and gospel of

(15 words)

see New Testament Apocrypha; Philippus, I Greek [I 28]

Philippi

(765 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg)
This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Christianity | Coloniae | Macedonia, Macedones | Macedonia, Macedones | Natural catastrophes | Education / Culture | Mineral Resources (Φίλιπποι/ Phílippoi, Latin Philippi). [German version] I. Founding Hellenistic and Roman Periods City in eastern Macedonia, founded by Philip [4] II around 355 BC on the site of Crenides or Daton (App. B. Civ. 4,105) on the occasion of the conquest of the region between the Strymon and the Nestus [1], inhabited by the Thracians (Thraci). The Via Eg…
▲   Back to top   ▲