Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Io

(541 words)

Author(s): Waldner, Katharina (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰώ; Iṓ). Daughter of  Inachus, king of Argus (Aesch. PV 589f.; Bacchyl. 19,18 et al.), or of  Peiren (or Peras or Peirasus), king of Tyrins (Hes. Cat. fr. 124), and Melia (Johannes Antiochenus FHG IV 544 fr. 14). Zeus falls in love with her and seduces her in the form of a bull. Out of jealousy, Hera transforms I. into a cow (Aesch. Supp. 299). According to Hes. Cat. fr. 124, I. is transformed by Zeus himself only after their affair in order to deceive Hera (so also Apollod. 2,1,3). According to Aes…

Iobaritae

(33 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰωβαρῖται; Iōbarîtai, Ἰοβαρῖται; Iobarîtai). Ethnic group in southern Arabia; only mentioned in Ptol. 6,7,24 as neighbours of the Sachalitae ( Sachalites). …

Iobates

(76 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰοβάτης/ Iobátēs, ‘who strides along powerfully’). King of Lycia (anonymous in Hom. Il. 6,174-177), to whom Proetus sends  Bellerophontes with the ‘Uriah letter’ (Apollod. 2,30ff.; Hyg. Fab. 57; cf. Plut. Mor. 248a-d). Father of  Stheneboea and Philonoe. An homonymous tragedy by Sophocles has been transmitted in fragmentary form (TrGF IV 297-299); Euripides wrote a

Iocaste

(232 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
[German version] (Ἰοκάστη/ Iokástē, in older sources also Ἐπικάστη/Epicaste). Daughter of  Menoeceus, sister of  Creon, wife of  Laius, mother and later wife of  Oedipus. In spite of the negative oracle of Apollo in Delphi, Laius fathers Oedipus with I. After his birth, Oedipus is abandoned, later kills his father and, after solving the puzzle of the  Sphinx, marries his mother. In the older sources, the gods reveal the incest (Hom. Od. 11, 271-280), whereupon I. kills herself. Here, I. usually has…

Iocheaira

(4 words)

see  Artemis

Iodama

(65 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰοδάμα; Iodáma). Local deity of Coronea (Boeotia), driven out by Athena. In mythology the daughter of  Itonus, granddaughter of  Amphictyon [2], priestess of Athena Itonia, who turned her to stone with the Gorgoneion (Paus. 9,34,2); in a different tradition mother of Thebe by Zeus, sister of Athena, killed by her out of jealousy (Simonides, FGrH 8 F 1). …

Iohannes

(7,268 words)

Author(s): Frey, Jörg (Stuttgart) | Domhardt, Yvonne (Zürich) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Redies, Michael (Berlin) | Et al.
(Ἰωάννης; Iōánnēs). Well-known persons i.a.: I. [1] the Evangelist, I. [4] Chrysostomos, bishop of Constantinople and Homilet, I. [18] Malalas, author of the world chronicle, I. [25] of Gaza, rhetor and poet, I. [33] of Damascus, the theologian, I. [39] Baptistes. [1] I. the Evangelist [German version] A. Tradition and criticism According to the inscriptions, the author of a  Gospel (Jo), of three letters and the Apocalypse in the NT is called I. (= J.; the name appears only in Apc. 1:1; 1:4; 1:9; 22:8). Since the end of the 2nd cent. (Iren. adversus haereses 3,1,1; Polycrates of Ephesus according to Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3,31,3; Clem. Al. according to Euseb. Hist. eccl. 6,14,7; Canon Muratori 9 Lietzmann), he has been widely identified with the ‘disciple of the Lord’, the son of Zebedee and brother of James who ranked sec…

Iolcus

(355 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Dark Ages | Mycenaean culture and archaeology | Aegean Koine | Aegean Koine | Aegean Koine (Ἰωλκός; Iōlkós). Already named in the most ancient legends (Aeson, Alcestis, Argonautae, Jason, Neleus, Peleus, Pelias). Residence city at the northern exit of the Gulf of  Pagasae on the Anaurus (modern Xerias). A large settlement mound in the old city of Volos (Kastro Volo) bears witness to continuity of settlement at the latest since the early Bronze Age - many Mycena…

Iole

(247 words)

Author(s): Waldner, Katharina (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰόλη; Iólē). Daughter of  Eurytus [1], king of Oechalia, and Antioche (Hes. Cat. fr. 26,31a), sister of  Iphitus, who was murdered by Heracles (cf. Hom. Od. 21,11-41). Although Herac…

Iomnium

(144 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Gr. Ἰόμνιον; Iómnion or Ἰόμνυον; Iómnyon). I. probably originated as a Phoenician or Punic trading post (as indicated by the letter I at the beginning of the name: ʾj = Punic ‘island’), located in  Mauretania Caesariensis, near the modern Tigzirt (Algeria). Ptol. 4,2,8; It. Ant. 17,1; Tab. Peut. 2,2. Inscriptions: CIL VIII 2, 8995-9001; Suppl. 3, 20710-20728; AE 1994, 1898 f.; Rev. Africaine 58, 1914, 342-353. It became a municipium under Septimius [II 7] Severus. The Punic tradition continued to remain vibrant for a long time. In the Roman peri…

Ion

(1,095 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
(Ἴων; Íōn). [German version] [1] Hero of the Ionians Eponymous hero of the Ionians ( Iones). Several traditions of his ancestry emphasizing Athens' political primacy are extant. The earliest and most influential versions present I. as the son of  Xuthus and Creusa, thus as the grandson of  Hellen, progenitor of the Hellenes, and of the Athenian king  Erechtheus (Str. 8,383; Paus. 7,1,2). I.'s brother is Achaeus [1], progenitor of the Achaeans, his paternal uncles are  Aeolus [1] and  Dorus. With his wife…

Iones

(466 words)

Author(s): Gschnitzer, Fritz (Heidelberg)
[German version] (Ἴωνες, Ionians). Name of a Greek tribe (older form Iāwones), first attested in a Cnossus text (B 164, l. 4) probably as the name of a foreign troop of warriors. Homer (Il. 13,685) applies the name to the Athenians, the Delphic hymn to Apollo (H. Hom. 5,147-155) refers to the Delphic festive gathering of the I., in the Amphiktyonia I. is the name of the tribe which is represented by Athens and the Euboean cities. In further sources of the archaic and classical peri…

Ionia

(154 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Ἰωνία; Iōnía, Ἰωνίη; Iōníē). West Anatolian countryside between Aeolis in the north, Lydia in the east, the Aegean in the west and Caria in the south; it includes the settlement area in Asia Minor of the  Iones, who moved in there in connection with the post-Mycenaean migration and since about 700 BC were amalgamated in the Panionian Amphiktyonia (cf. the descriptions of I. in Str. 14,1; Plin. HN 5,112-120) with the cities of (cf. Hdt. 1,1…

Ionian migration

(5 words)

see  Colonization

Ionian Revolt

(306 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
[German version] The Greek cities in  Ionia were compliant subjects of the Persians from 546/5 BC. Beginning with the further expansion of the Persian empire towards the west, the limitations to their trade as a result, increasing taxes and conscription led many cities to attach themselves in 499 to the initiator of the rebellions,  Aristagoras [2]. The latter had given up the tyranny in  Miletus, proclaimed   isonomía and secured military support from Athens and Eretria for the revolt. In 498 the Milesians and their allies attacked  Sardes …

Ioniapolis

(143 words)

Author(s): Peschlow-Bindokat, Anneliese (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰωνιάπολις; Iōniápolis). Milesian harbour town on the south bank of the former Latmian Gulf, modern Bafa Gölü. Material from the nearby marble quarries was shipped via this harbour to build the Temple of Apollo at  Didyma. Many Didymaean column drums within a settlement of late antiquity are preserved on the shore and in the water near Pınarcık Yayla (formerly Mersinet Iskelesi). The ancient harbour is assumed to have been further out to sea, as the water level has risen. The name…

Ionic

(1,585 words)

Author(s): García-Ramón, José Luis (Cologne) | Binder, Vera (Gießen)
[German version] I. Pre-classical period to the Koine Beginning in the pre-classical period, Ionic is attested in three main regions, from where it spread in the course of the second  colonization to the end of the Pontus and to Hispania: (1) West Ionic: Euboea (and Oropus) with colonies in Chalcidice (Olynthus), Lower Italy (Cyme, Pithekussa), and Sicily, (2) Ionic of the Cyclades: i.a. Ceos, Delos, Paros (and Thasos), Naxos (and Amorgos), (3) East Ionic: (Ionia and the offshore islands of Chios and Samos): i.a. Phocaea (including Massalia and its settlements in Emporiae in the northeast of Spain and Pech-Maho in the south of France), Smyrna, Clazomenae, Erythrae, Teos, Ephesus, Priene, Miletus, Halicarnassus. Archaic inscriptions are particularly instructive regarding Ionic, because it was strongly influenced or replaced by  At…
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