Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Fibrenus

(57 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Left tributary of the Liris in Latium in the region between Sora and Arpinum, modern Fibreno. At its mouth was the location of Cicero's villa (Cic. Leg. 2,6), remains of which are thought to be recognizable in the abbey of San Domenico near Isola del Liri. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography Nissen vol. 2, 670.

Fibula

(55 words)

Author(s): Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)
[German version] (Lat. fibula, from figibula; figere, ‘tack’, ‘pin’), a multi-part clasp used in clothing. Because of the wide range of types and decor, fibulae provide one of the most important guides for the differentiation and chronology of prehistoric and primitive cultures. For the various types and cultures, see  Needle. Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)

Fictio

(422 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] Fictio, rooted in Roman jurisprudence, describes a technique still used in modern legal practice in order to arrange sanctions for different circumstances from those originally addressed by the law through working on the assumption that both sets of circumstances are identical, even though in reality they are not. This concept developed from the religious rule stating simulacra pro veris accipiuntur (‘images are accepted as reality’): Priests as the first legal experts in Rome's early history transferred the concept expressed in this reli…

Fictores

(118 words)

Author(s): Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover)
[German version] (‘moulders of sacrificial cakes’, bakers). They assisted the   pontifices ( fictores pontificum: CIL VI 1074; 10247) and the Vestals ( fictores virginum Vestalium: CIL VI 786; 2134; Varro, Ling. 7,44, Cic. Dom. 139), their office, according to Ennius (Ann. 115), dated back to Numa. The fictores baked the sacrificial cakes ( liba) ─ a task which they may have taken over from the Vestal virgins ─ and sometimes they were also present at the sacrifices themselves. Cf. strufertarii (Fest. 85 L.), who offered   strues and fertum. Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover) Bibliography M. I…

Ficulea

(94 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Tribus Town in Latium, north-east of Rome on the via Ficulensis (Liv. 3,52,3), subsequently the via Nomentana [1. 43], localized near Casale di Marco Simone Vecchio. It was originally founded by Aborigines (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,16), then by the Prisci Latini; captured by Tarquinius Priscus (Liv. 1,38,4); municipium (Plin. HN 3,64). Atticus (Cic. Att. 12,34) and Martial (6,27,2) owned estates near F. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography 1 A. Nibby, Analisi storico-topografico-antiquaria della carta dei d…

Fideicommissum

(767 words)

Author(s): Manthe, Ulrich (Passau)
[German version] The fideicommissum (literally: ‘entrusted to faith’), which from the 2nd cent. BC (Ter. Andr. 290-298) appeared alongside the legatum (legacy), was a request of the testator to an heir or legatee to pass on the inheritance in part or total to a third party. Since a fideicommissum was not subject to the same restrictions as the civil law of succession, it was used to make a bequest to a person who would otherwise not be eligible to be an heir or to receive a legacy (non-citizens; women according to the lex Voconia,  Laws of succession III. D.; the unmarried and the chil…

Fidelis

(100 words)

Author(s): Johne, Klaus-Peter (Berlin)
[German version] (Φιδέλιος; Phidélios) of Milan. Lawyer in Rome and in AD 527/8 quaestor palatii of the Ostrogoth king  Athalaricus (Cassiod. Var. 8,18f.). In 536, he was sent to  Belisarius on behalf of the citizens of Rome and pope Silverius, in order to hand over the city (Procop. Goth. 1,14,5). In 537/8, he served as praefectus praetorio for the Eastern Roman Empire. In 538, he fell into the hands of the Goths near Ticinum, who killed him as a traitor (Procop. Goth. 1,20,19f.; 2,12,27f.; 34f.). Johne, Klaus-Peter (Berlin) Bibliography PLRE 2, 469f. Stein, Spätröm. R. vol. 2, 348, 354.

Fidenae

(163 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Tribus Latin town on a hill left of the Tiber along the via Salaria (Tab. Peut. 5,5), five (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 2,53) or six (Eutr. 1,4,19) miles from Rome. It was settled from the Iron Age onwards [1], and took part in the feriae Latinae on mons Albanus (Plin. HN 3,69). During the 5th cent., it was allied with Veii (Liv. 4,17ff.). At the time of Horace (Epist. 1,11,8), it was almost completely abandoned. The collapse of the wooden amphitheatre in AD 27 claimed many victims, the majority of…

Fidenas

(66 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen (‘victor over Fidenae’), transmitted for the Sergii and Servilii of the early Republican era (5th/4th cents. BC); the dictator Q.  Servilius Priscus allegedly captured the town of Fidenae in Latium in 435 and subsequently was given the epithet (Liv. 4,45,5). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Kajanto, Cognomina 181 F. Münzer, s.v. Servilius, RE II A 2, 1789f.; 1803f. W. Reichmuth, Die lat. Gentilicia, 1956, 55.

Fidentia

(127 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Augural name of a town in the western Aemilia ( regio VIII) on the via Aemilia (It. Ant. 288; It. Burd. 616; Tab. Peut. 4,3) on the crossing of the river Stirone, in the Middle Ages Borgo San Donnino, from 1927 Fidenza (Parma). It was founded as a municipium in the 2nd cent. BC; during the Civil War, it was besieged by Lucullus in 82 BC (Plut. Sulla 17; Vell. Pat. 2,28; Liv. Epit. 88). It later declined to become vicus Fidentiola (It. Ant. 99; 127). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography A. Aimi, Storia di F., 1982 M. Calvani Marini, F., 1977 M. Catarsi, Il territorio fidenti…

Fides

(1,654 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva) | Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen) | Büchli, Jörg (Zürich)
[German version] I. Religion F. is the cultically venerated personification of faith and veracity [1]. According to Varro (Ling. 5,74), she had been adopted in Rome from the Sabini; her cult is still in evidence at the end of the 2nd cent. AD (Tert. Apol. 24,5). F. is depicted as a woman, her head adorned with a garland or veil, dressed in a   chitṓn and péplos [2]. She appears frequently in poetry, but rarely in prose. She was considered to be a very ancient deity (Sil. Pun. 1,329f.; 2,484ff.) and therefore referred to as cana (Verg. Aen. 1,292). According to Agathocles Perì Kyzíkou (Fest. 328 L…

Fiducia

(769 words)

Author(s): Schanbacher, Dietmar (Dresden)
[German version] Term for ‘fiduciary agreement’, (e.g. Paulus, Sent. 2,13,1) also for the object held in trust. Fiducia could be found in various aspects of Roman civil law: In the law of persons, there was the coemptio of women (a form of   mancipatio , Gai. Inst. 3,113), not only for the purpose of marriage ( matrimonii causa), but also in the context of the transference of property on trust ( fiduciae causa), e.g. in order to avoid one kind of guardianship (  tutela ) and to establish a different one (of a tutor fiduciarius) (Gai. Inst. 1,114; 115). The law of persons and obligations …

Fig

(523 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] The fig has been indigenous to southern Europe since at least the Neolithic period, as documented by fruit discoveries from Lerna, the Argolid and the Bronze Age at the Mincio. The first literary references are in the Odyssey (e.g. Hom. Od. 11,588; 12,103). The fig is represented by two deciduous species of the genus Ficus of the Moraceae: (a) Ficus carica L. as ἐρινεός ( erineós), the goat fig as a wild form besides to the συκῆ ( sykê), the cultivated eating fig that was pollinated by a male plant ( caprificus) of (a). (b) the sycamore or mulberry fig, Ficus sycomorus L. (συκόμορ…

Figulus

(34 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen (‘Potter’), attested to in the fasti of the Republican period for the family of the Marcii and the writer P.  Nigidius Figulus. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Kajanto, Cognomina 322.

Figura etymologica

(5 words)

see  Figures

Figured poem

(1,525 words)

Author(s): Ernst, Ulrich (Wuppertal RWG)
Ernst, Ulrich (Wuppertal RWG) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) In Antiquity, three forms of the Figured Poem (FP) were developed: 1. the mimetic acrostic poem invented by members of the Koian Writers' League around or after 300 BC: Simias of Rhodes in the form of wings, an egg and a hatchet; Theocritus in the verse measures of a syrinx; and Dosiadas of Crete in the contours of two altars [4].  Evidence of correlations with figurative epigraphics, magical words, griphos poetry and verse experiments c…

Figures

(1,998 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
(Lat. figura; Greek σχῆμα/ schêma; French figure). [German version] A. Overview Figures are formal phenomena of language beyond the grammatical primary structure. In rhetoric they are treated in the context of   elocutio under the category ornatus (decoration) and are mostly defined as deviations from normal language usage; if they are few in number, it is considered as paucity of expression (Quint. Inst. 9,3,3). The theory of figures assumes that there is a raw framework of arguments in simple words that has to be clad and orname…

Figures, theory of

(4,789 words)

Author(s): Usener, Sylvia (Wuppertal RWG)
Usener, Sylvia (Wuppertal RWG) [German version] A. Definition (CT) The rhetorical and stylistic theory of figures (ToF) addresses the form, function and origin as well as the classification of figures of speech. According to the ancient (and still generally valid) definition, figures are intentional deviations from normal usage or elaborations of 'normal language' aimed at achieving different stylistic or argumentative effects. The rhetorical ToF, as a prose style, differs from the poetic ToF in terms of…

Figurine vases

(418 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] Vases worked three-dimensionally using a combination of techniques; figurine vases made by coroplasts, often originating from the same moulds as the statuettes (terracottas). Precursors in Anatolia, Egypt and the Ancient Orient. Greek figurine vases of clay (birds, cattle, horses) in greater numbers from the 14th cent. BC. [1]. Vast production of ointment vessels with glazed clay painting in the 7th-6th cents. BC e.g. in Corinth [2], Rhodes [3] and Boeotia: complete figures, busts…

Film

(4,380 words)

Author(s): Wieber-Scariot, Anja (Dortmund RWG)
Wieber-Scariot, Anja (Dortmund RWG) [German version] A. History (CT) The beginning of the silent film era at the end of the 19th cent. opened up a new venue for communicating information about the ancient world. The medium of film addresses Antiquity in two ways, first in the form of citations [30; 36], i.e. references to ancient names, motifs and objects. For example, ancient tragedy and its chorus provided the framework plot for Woody Allen's Mighty Aphrodite (USA 1995), while the comedy 9 to 5 (USA 1980), in which three secretaries stage a revolt against their boss, echoes …
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