Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Cynossema

(67 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Κυνὸς σῆμὰ; Kynòs sêma, ‘dog grave’). Cape on Thracian Chersonesus south of Madytus near modern Kilit Bahır where the Hellespont is at its very narrowest, well known for the sea victory of the Attic fleet over the Peloponnesians in 411 BC (Thuc. 8,104-107; Diod. Sic. 13,40,6; cf. also regarding the name ‘dog grave’ Eur. Hec. 1270ff.; Ov. Met. 13,569). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)

Cynosura

(346 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) | Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) | Lafond, Yves (Bochum) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
(Κυνόσουρα; Kynósoura, ‘dog's tail’). Name of several headlands. [German version] [1] Promontory on the east coast of the island of Salamis Promontory on the east coast of the island of Salamis, 4 km long and narrow (Hdt. 8,76,1; 77,1). Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) Bibliography Philippson/Kirsten 1, 870. [German version] [2] Narrow headland in the north-east of the bay of Marathon Narrow headland in the north-east of the bay of Marathon, where the Persian fleet landed in 490 BC (Paus. 1,32,3; 7), modern Cape Stomi. On C. there are walls of unknown d…

Cynthus

(35 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen)
[German version] (Κύνθος; Kýnthos, Latin Cynthus). Name of a mountain 113 m high on  Delos with a sanctuary to Zeus (Cynthius) and Athena (Cynthia). Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) Bibliography G. Gruben, Die Tempel der Griechen, 41986, 146f.

Cynuria

(460 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
(Κυνουρία; Kynouría, Κυνοσουρία; Kynossouría). [German version] [1] Landscape on the Gulf of Argolis Landscape on the Gulf of Argolis on the north-eastern coast of the Parnon mountains. As a border region between Laconia and Argolis, C. was often the cause of disputes between Sparta and Argos (cf. Str. 1,4,7). The northern part, the Thyreatis, one of the most fertile plains of the Peloponnese, consisted of the valleys of Tanos and Vrasiotis. According to Herodotus (8,73,1; 3), C. was originally Ionian and wa…

Cynus

(168 words)

Author(s): Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan)
[German version] (Κῦνος; Kŷnos). Town of Opuntian  Locris (Hom. Il. 2,531; Scyl. 60; Lycoph. Alexandra 1147; Ptol. 3,15,9; Plin. HN 4,27; Hecat. in Steph. Byz. s.v. Κ.; Mela 2,3,40) and ship mooring place (ἐπίνειον; epíneion, emporium) of  Opus (Paus. 10,1,2; Str. 9,4,2; Steph. Byz. loc. cit.; Liv. 28,6,12). The settlement covered the peak of the hill, known as modern Palaiopyrgos or Pyrgos after the ruins of the ancient walls and after a medieval tower that juts out over the little bay on the northern tip of the plain of Ataland…

Cypaera

(104 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Κύπαιρα; Kýpaira). Neighbouring town of Xyniae in south-western Achaea Phthiotis on the border with Dolopia, near modern Palaia Giannitsu (not near modern Makryrrachi, formerly Kaitsa). For 363 BC a temple donation from C. is noted in Delphi (Syll.3 239 B 12). From the end of the 3rd cent. C. belonged to the League of the Aetolians who conquered it back in 198 BC from its short-term possession by the Macedonians (Liv. 32,13,14). Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) Bibliography B. Helly, Incursions chez les Dolopes, in: I. Blum (ed.), Topographie antique et géograph…

Cyparissia

(301 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
(Κυπαρισσία; Kyparissía). [German version] [1] Town on the Messenian west coast This item can be found on the following maps: Sparta | Achaeans, Achaea Town on the Messenian west coast and the location of the modern town of the same name with a few remains mostly from Roman times; parts of the wall of the acropolis below a medieval castle. Aside from Pylos and Methone, the harbour of C. with its good connection to the upper Pamisus Valley was considered the only significant Messenian access to the sea. C. is already mentioned in the Pylos Tablets and is in any case identical to Κυπαρισσήεις ( Kypar…

Cyparissus

(325 words)

Author(s): Schlapbach, Karin (Zürich) | Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan)
(Κυπάρισσος; Kypárissos). [German version] [1] Of Ceos of Ceos, beloved of  Apollo. Pained because he had accidentally killed his own favourite stag, C. begged to be allowed to mourn for ever and was turned into a cypress (Ov. Met. 10,106-142). Even though Ovid provides the earliest documentary evidence, the story itself is believed to be much older [1. 52]. In Servius' version, C. is a son of  Telephus, also hailing from Crete, also beloved of  Zephyrus or  Silvanus, but the stag was killed by Silvanu…

Cyphanta

(86 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Sparta (Κύφαντα or Κύφας; Kýphanta or Kýphas). Spartan perioikic polis (  períoikoi ) on the east coast of the  Parnon peninsula with an Asclepius sanctuary, already in ruins at the time of Pausanias, located in the bay with the mod. name of Kyparissi. Documentary evidence: Pol. 4,36,5; Paus. 3,24,2; Ptol. 3,16,10; 22; Plin. HN 4,17. Lafond, Yves (Bochum) Bibliography Pritchett 7, 1991, 146-149 A. J. B. Wace, F. W. Hasluck, East-Central Laconia, in: ABSA 15, 1908/9, 173.

Cypress

(344 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] Of the conifer genus Lat. cupressus (since Enn. Ann. 262 (223) and 490 (511); late Lat. cyparissus, Isid. Orig. 17,7,34; κυπάρισσος/ kypárissos, probably from the pre-Indogermanic, already in Hom. Od. 5,64) with 14 species, only the wild form C. sempervirens L. with the variant C. horizontalis ( C. mas in Plin. HN 16,141) occurred in south-east Europe. However, the old culture strain [1. 34 ff.] of the variant C. pyramidalis ( C. femina: Plin. HN 16,141; it was already sown by Cato: Cato Agr. 48,1; 151), widespread and well known on Cyprus and Crete…

Cypria

(590 words)

Author(s): Latacz, Joachim (Basle)
[German version] (τὰ Κύπρια; tà Kýpria; also τὰ Κύπρια ἔπη; tà Kýpria épē, τὰ Κυπριακά; tà Kypriaká, αἱ Κυπριακαὶ ἱστορίαι; hai kupriakai historíai, its title derived from the dominance of Aphrodite = Cypris in the causality of the plot [3; cf. 9. 287]). This epic, a part of the  epic cycle, recounts in 11 bks. (according to Proclus) the history of Troy prior to the better-known Iliad ( Homerus [1]). Approximately 50 hexameters in 12 [1] or respectively 10 [2] frs. are extant; in addition there are short summaries in  Proclus and  Apollodorus, as well as nume…

Cyprianus

(1,077 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] [1] C. Gallus Heptateuch poet see  Heptateuch poet Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) [2] C. Thascius Caecili(an)us From AD 248/9 bishop of Carthago [German version] A. Biography Caecilius Cyprianus qui et Thascius (his transmitted name, combining his original Punic cognomen Thascius C. with a newly adopted Christian cognomen after his godfather Caecilianus, according to Pontius, vita 4 -- or rather Caecilius, according to Jer. Vir. ill. 67 [1. 110, n. 1]) was the son of wealthy parents. Prior to his conversion t…

Cypriot

(953 words)

Author(s): Hintze, Almut (Cambridge) | Binder, Vera (Gießen)
[German version] I. Ancient Cypriot The sources for C. are inscriptions in  Cypriot script (most important finding places: Idalium, Golgi, Paphus, Marion; oldest Text: o-pe-le-ta-u / opheltau/11th/10th cents. BC),  glossography (esp. Hsch., schol. on the Iliad and the Odyssey, fr. of an anonymous grammarians: Anecd. Bekk. 3,1094) and Cypriot proper names. C. a) corresponds particularly with  Arcadian and in parts also with  Mycenaean, and b) has its own specific features. For a): arsis of e, o before a nasal sound (/ in/= ἐν, / on-/ un-/ = ἀνά) and of o (gen. sg. in / -au/< -āo, 3rd sg. -tu

Cypriot Archaeology

(5 words)

see  Cyprus

Cypriot Script

(678 words)

Author(s): Hintze, Almut (Cambridge)
[German version] The Cypriot script (CS), probably a further development of the  Cypro-Minoan scripts [1; 2], is a syllabic script, related to  Linear B, with signs for vowels and open syllables. Their common origin is apparent in signs which correspond not only in form, but also in phonetic value ( lo/ ro, na, pa, po, se, ta/ da, to, ti). In contrast with Linear B, CS is a purely syllabic script (without ideograms). There are also minor differences in the orthographic rules: in CS, t and d are not differentiated ( i-ta-te = Attic ἐνθάδε), whereas r and l are ( lu-sa-to-ro = Attic gen. Λυσάνδρο…

Cypriot scripts (medieval)

(209 words)

Author(s): Eleuteri, Paolo (Venice)
[German version] Collective term for Greek scripts from the 2nd half of the 11th cent. AD, esp. on the island of Cyprus, as well as from Palestine.  These scripts did not fully develop their characteristic traits until the period between 1250 and 1300. One of these traits is the so-called 'epsilon style', a vertical, calligraphic style with pseudo-ligatures executed with an upward stroke in two forms: a rectangular one and a small round one. The latter is common in the so-called 'Family 2400' of t…

Cypro-Minoan Scripts

(708 words)

Author(s): Hintze, Almut (Cambridge)
[German version] Term coined by Arthur Evans to describe the late Bronze Age Cypriot linear scripts related to  Linear A [1. 69f.] ( Cyprus). The writing system is presumed to have been syllabic, but the texts are still largely undeciphered. Differences in writing modus, form of signs, and sign inventory have led to the distinction of three variants [2. 11-17]: (a) Cypro-Minoan (= CM) 1, (b) CM 2, (c) CM 3. On (a): From the late 16th to 11th cents. BC, texts in CM 1 are found all over Cyprus and also in north Syrian Ras Šamra ( Ugarit). The signs are painted on …

Cyprus

(1,764 words)

Author(s): Peña, P. Bádenas De La | Tsakmakis, Antonis (Nicosia )
Peña, P. Bádenas De La [German version] Cyprus (CT) Because of its strategic position, the island of Cyprus (C.) has always been a place where the claims of the various powers of the eastern Mediterranean for supremacy clashed. From the 12th cent. BC on the Greeks increasingly left their mark; added to this in Antiquity were Phoenicians, Assyrians, Egyptians, Persians and Romans; in the Middle Ages Franks and Venetians; and in the modern period Turks and Britons, all of whom, to varying degrees, left tra…

Cyprus

(2,847 words)

Author(s): Senff, Reinhard (Bochum) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich) | Berger, Albrecht (Berlin) | Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Cyprus [3] The island was incorporated into Roman possessions in 58 BC and remained part of the province of Cilicia until 48/47 BC. It was returned to the Ptolemaic kingdom by Caesar and Antony, and came permanently into Roman possession from 30 BC. As a province in its own rights, it was initially administered by a legatus, then from 22 BC by the Senate through an annually appointed procurator; following Diocletian's reorganization of the provinces, it was placed under the administration of the consularis of the dioecesis Oriens in Antioch [1] . After the initial f…

Cypsela

(125 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Byzantium (Κύψελα; Kýpsela, Cypsala). Inland Thracian town on the lower left bank of the  Hebrus at the via Egnatia (Str. 7,7,4), in a very marshy area (Str. 7,7,4; 6; 7a,1,9f.; 48; 57), mod. Ipsala. In the 4th cent. BC, C. was residence and mint of the  Odrysae dynasty. Because it was in Ptolemaic possession, the town was besieged by  Antiochus [3] II in 254 BC (Polyaenus, Strat. 4,16); in c. 200 BC, it was taken by Philip V. In 188 BC, Cn. Manlius Vulso was attacked by Thracians near C. In the Byzantine perio…
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