Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Xandrames

(129 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] (Ξανδράμης/ Xandrámēs). Indian king (in Diod. Sic. 17,93,2; Latin Agrammes in Curt. 9,2,3; Sacram(es) in the Epitome Mettensis 68), second half of the 4th cent. BC. He was described to Alexander [4] as the most powerful king in the Ganges valley. It is therefore probably Nandrus, the last king of the Nanda dynasty in Indian sources, that is meant (Nandas). The account in Just. Epit. 15,4,12-19 of the fall of Nandrus Chandragupta (Sandracottus; Mauryas), although differing in detail, in general…

Xanten

(9 words)

see Vetera; Colonia Ulpia Traiana; Archaeological park

Xanthea

(95 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Ξάνθεια; Xántheia). City in Thrace between the Bistonis limne (modern Lake Vistonida) and Maronea [1] on the northern coast of the Aigaion Pelagos (Str. 7a,1,44) on the southern slopes of Rhodope, not precisely locatable. In the Byzantine city of the same name no remains suggesting Antiquity have been discovered; it was on the Via Egnatia (Nikephoros Gregoras 727,24; 814,19); modern Xanthi. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography S. P. Kyriakidis, Περὶ τὴν ἱστορίαν τῆς Θρᾴκης, 1960, 27-32  P. A. Pantos, Ἱστορικὴ τοπογραφία τοῦ νομοῦ Ξάνθης…

Xanthi

(45 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Ξάνθοι; Xánthoi). Thracian people (Hecat. FGrH 1 F 180), whose location cannot be determined; mentioned in Str. 13,1,21 in a list of Thracian/Trojan homonyms as a parallel to the River Xanthus (Hom. Il. 20,74; Scamander) in the Troad. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)

Xanthippe

(279 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel) | Döring, Klaus (Bamberg)
(Ξανθίππη; Xanthíppē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Dorus Daughter of Dorus, with Pleuron parent of Agenor [3], Sterope, Stratonice and Laophonte (Apollod. 1,58). Antoni, Silke (Kiel) [German version] [2] Mythical feeder of her imprisoned father Mycon Woman who fed her father Mycon in prison with her milk (Hyg. Fab. 254; the same motif with different names: Val. Max. 5,4, ext. 1; Plin. HN 7,121; Fest. 228,28-32; Solin. 1,124f.; Nonn. Dion. 26,101-145). Antoni, Silke (Kiel) [German version] [3] Wife of the philosopher Socrates [2] Wife of the philosopher Socrates [2]; orig…

Xanthippus

(704 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Ameling, Walter (Jena)
(Ξάνθιππος/ Xánthippos). [German version] [1] Athenian from the Cholargos deme, father of Pericles, around 500 BC Athenian from the Cholargos deme, father of Ariphron, Pericles [1] and a daughter, born c. 520 BC, married to Agariste [2], a niece of the Alcmeonid Cleisthenes [2]. In 489 BC X. argued as plaintiff for Miltiades' [2] conviction. In Aristoteles [6] X. therefore appears not only as a leading demagogue but also as an adversary of Miltiades ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 28,2). In the spring of 484 X. was banished by ostrakismos from Athens, perhaps as an o…

Xanthius

(113 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
(Ξάνθιος/ Xánthios). [German version] [1] Father of Leucippus from the Bellerophontes family Father of Leucippus [3] from the Bellerophontes family. When his daughter's fiancé tells him that she has had a relationship with another man, in an attempt to apprehend the stranger, he - unaware that the culprit is his own son - unintentionally wounds his daughter, before inadvertently being killed by his own son (Parthenius, Narrationes amatoriae 5,1-5 according to Hermesianax). Antoni, Silke (Kiel) [German version] [2] Boeotian king Boeotian king, killed in a single combat by Me…

Xanthus

(1,334 words)

Author(s): Stenger, Jan (Kiel) | Robbins, Emmet (Toronto) | Högemann, Peter (Tübingen) | W.T.
(Ξάνθος/ Xánthos). [German version] [1] Name of several figures in Greek mythology Name of several male figures in Greek mythology: 1) Son of Phaenops [2], who was killed by Diomedes [1] at the gates of Troy (Hom. Il. 5,152-158). 2) Son of Triopas and Oreasis. X. received a part of Lycia; from there, he settled the deserted island of Lesbos (Diod. Sic. 5,81,2; Hyg. Fab. 145). 3) One of the sons of Aegyptus, who is killed by Arcadia, daughter of Danaus (Hyg. Fab. 170). 4) A son of Niobe (Pherecydes FGrH 3 F …

Xeine

(84 words)

Author(s): Quack, Joachim (Berlin)
[German version] (ξείνη/ xeínē, 'stranger'). According to Hdt. 2,112 term for a  manifestation of Aphrodite, with a temple in Memphis. Presumably it was a cult of the Syrian goddess Astarte, i.e. 'the Stranger', who had been worshipped there since the Eighteenth Dynasty [1. 45]. It is uncertain whether it can be identified with a temple of Aphrodite or Selene mentioned in Str. 17,1,31 [2. 136]. Quack, Joachim (Berlin) Bibliography 1 A. B. Lloyd, Herodotus, Book II, Commentary 99-182, 1988 2 J. Yoyotte, P. Charvet, Strabon, Le voyage en Égypte (transl. with comm.), 1997.

Xenagoras

(338 words)

Author(s): Gärtner, Hans Armin (Heidelberg)
(Ξεναγόρας/ Xenagóras). [German version] [1] Greek historian and geographer, probably in the 3rd cent. BC Greek historian and geographer probably in the 3rd cent. BC (X. FGrH 240), mentioned by Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,72,5 after Callias [10] [1. 912 f.]. It is unclear whether he was identical to X. from Heraclea [7], the father of Nymphis [1. 913; 2. 1410 f.]. He wrote a chronicle that included Egypt (F 1) and the west, esp. Sicily (F 12; 14; 15; 17; 18), probably Italy i.e. Rome as well (if F 29 is a part of the chronicle) in at least 4 bks. (title: Χρόνοι/ Chrónoi , FGrH 240 F 1). It cove…

Xenagorou nesoi

(84 words)

Author(s): Hild, Friedrich (Vienna)
[German version] (Ξεναγόρου νῆσοι/ Xenagórou nêsoi). Island group off the western coast of Lycia: the rocky islands of Sıçan (Byzantine Ochentres) and Yılan (Byzantine Dragonēsi) outside the bay of Kalkan between the island of Roge (Byzantine Rhō) and Patara ( Stadiasmus maris magni 245 f.). According to Plin. HN 5,131 ( Xenagora VIII) further islands could be meant by XN. Hild, Friedrich (Vienna) Bibliography A. Delatte, Les Portulans grecs, 1947, 183, 254 F. Hild, H. Hellenkemper, in: TIB 8 (Lykien und Pamphylien), 2004 H. Treidler, s. v. X. n., RE 9 A, 1417.

Xenagos

(188 words)

Author(s): Cartledge, Paul A. (Cambridge)
[German version] (ξεναγός; xenagós). The word xenagos was a Spartan technical term, literally a 'leader of foreigners' (ξένοι/ xénoi); this referred to the Greek allies of Sparta within the Spartan symmachy ( s ymmachia ). Originally, a xenagos was a high-ranking Spartan officer designated to take overall command of the troops of an allied city (Xen. Ag. 2,10; Xen. Hell. 3,5,7; 4,2,19). The post of xenagos, which is first documented for the opening phase of the Peloponnesian War (in 429 BC: Thuc. 2,75,3), was probably created soon after the Persian Wars or sh…

Xenarchus

(885 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) | Furley, William D. (Heidelberg) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | A.FA.
(Ξέναρχος; Xénarchos). [German version] [1] Comedy writer, 4th cent. BC Comedy writer of the (probably late) 4th cent. BC. Eight play titles (quite typical of this period) and 14 fragments have been preserved (exclusively in Athenaeus [3]). In fragment 1, a speaker (perhaps a slave, also the eponym character, Butalíōn) laments in exuberant dithyrambistic language, that there is no means of curing his master's impotence [2. 263]; in fragment 4 (Πένταθλος/ Péntathlos, 'Pentathlete') a brothel-keeper sings a song in praise of prostitutes and risk-free love-for-s…

Xenares

(141 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] (Ξενάρης; Xenárēs). Spartiate, probably identical to the son of Cnidis who, as harmost ( Harmostaí [2]) in Heraclea [1] Trachinia in the winter of 420/19 BC, fell in battle against the Aenianes, the Dolopes and other tribes in that territory (Thuc. 5,51,2). As éphoros in 421/20 BC, X. and his colleague in office Cleobulus [3] rejected the alliance between Sparta and Athens concluded after the Peace of Nicias [1]. After unofficial negotiations with the Boeotians and the Corinthians, the two managed to conclude a special a…

Xenelasia

(294 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] (ξενηλασία; xenēlasía). 'Expulsion of aliens' (Xenoi), traditionally incorrectly represented as a measure often repeated by the Spartans to protect their city from outside influences (Xen. Lac. 14,4), traced to Lycurgus [4] in the tradition in Plutarch (Lycurgus 27,7; Agis 9; Mor. 238d) and explained by scholars e.g. by an alleged internal change in Sparta in the 6th cent. BC. The first xenelasia is supposed to have been the expulsion of Maeandrius [1] of Samos (Hdt. 3,148); however, that was not a general prohibition of residence for fore…

Xenetus

(63 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
[German version] (Ξένετος; Xénetos). Prominent citizen of Locri [2] in Lower Italy. In a double wedding in 398 BC Dionysius [1] I of Syracuse married both X.' daughter Doris and the Syracusan Aristomache, bestowing his favour on both women equally. Later he held X.' wife responsible for Aristomache's infertility and had her killed (Diod. 14,44,6-45,1; Plut. Dion 3,3-6). Meister, Klaus (Berlin)

Xenia

(551 words)

Author(s): Kowalzig, Barbara (Oxford)
[German version] (τὰ ξένια/ xénia neutr. pl., also θεοξένια/ theoxénia, feminine singular: 'hospitality (to the gods)'). A Greek rite of central importance in which, as an alternative to a customary sacrifice, gods and heroes of all kinds were invited to a public or private sacrificial meal. Literature, archaeology and inscriptions offer abundant evidence for 'tables of offering' ( hierà trápeza) set with food and klinai with blankets for the entertainment of the divine guests. Smaller sacrificial offerings (such as fruit and cakes) were put on the 'tables o…

Xeniades

(256 words)

Author(s): Bodnár, István (Budapest)
(Ξενιάδης; Xeníadēs). [German version] [1] Proto-sceptic philosopher from Corinth, 5th cent. BC X. from Corinth. Proto-sceptic philosopher of the 5th cent. BC. Sextus [2] Empiricus (the only source) repeatedly cites him, together with other philosophers who rejected a criterion of truth and falsehood (S. Emp. P. H. 2,18; S. Emp. Adv. math. 7,48), as an example of an archetypical negative dogmatist; he is said to have considered all phenomena or opinions as misleading or false (S. Emp. P. H. 2,76; S. Emp. Ad…

Xenias

(214 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
(Ξενίας; Xenías). [German version] [1] Arcadian from Parrhasia, mercenary leader of Cyrus [3] the Younger, c. 400 BC Arcadian from Parrhasia; as a mercenary leader in 405/4 BC he accompanied Cyrus [3] the Younger to the court of the Persian king and later took a large number of mercenaries to him in Sardis (Xen. An. 1,1,2; 2,1-3), but, together with Pasion [1] from Megara, left Cyrus' army in Syria without taking his family, which Cyrus sent after him (Xen. An. 1,4,6-8). Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) [German version] [2] From Elis, pro-Spartan oligarch, c. 400 BC Rich Elean (Elis [2]), próx…

Xenias graphe

(360 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ξενίας γραφή; xenías graphḗ), literally a 'charge/claim of (the status of) foreigner'. Public action for arrogation of Athenian citizenship. A Greek polis was constituted as an association of persons; despite their right to personal freedom, outsiders ( xénoi ,  cf. [1. 1442-1447; 4. 18-27]) had no fundamental participation in family or citizen status, or in the protection of the law. The rights of  a citizen (πολίτης/ polítēs; presumably to be distinguished from an  ἀστός/ astós  [3. 49-78]) could be exercised in Athens only by somebody who had been…

Xenion

(88 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
[German version] (Ξενίων; Xeníōn). Author of an historical treatise on Crete, Κρητικά ( Krētiká ) or Περὶ Κρήτης ( Perì Krḗtēs ). Pol. 6,45,1, where X. should probably be read instead of Xenophon [2] as the informant on the Cretan constitution, can probably be added to the fragments in FGrH 460 cf. [1]. It would result in X.'s being dated 'before Polybius', i.e. before the end of the 3rd cent. BC. Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography 1 K. Ziegler, Ein neues Fragment des Historikers X., in: Hermes 82, 1954, 498 f.

Xenion

(6 words)

see Epigrammatic poetry

Xenios

(4 words)

see Zeus

Xenippa

(122 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[German version] Fertile and densely settled area in Sogdiana, mentioned only in Curt. 8,2,14 as "bordering Scythia." The location and region are today identified with Erkurgan and its surrounding area near Karshi in the plain of the River Qashqadaryo in Uzbekistan. At the approach of Alexander [4]  the Great in the winter of 329/8 BC the inhabitants of X. expelled the Bactrians (Bactria) that had defected from the Macedonians and sought refuge in their land. Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) Bibliography 1 F. Grenet, Zoroastre au Badakhshân, in: Studia Iranica 31, 2002, 193-214 2 C. Rapin, …

Xenoclea

(54 words)

Author(s): Goldhahn, Tobias
[German version] (Ξενοκλεία; Xenokleía). Prómantis of the Oracle at Delphi. At first unwilling to prophesy for Heracles [1], who is sullied by the murder of Iphitos, after the theft and return of the tripod she nevertheless does (Paus. 10,13,8; Apollod. 2,130; schol. Pind.  Ol. 9,43, without mention of her name). Goldhahn, Tobias

Xenocleides

(307 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
(Ξενοκλείδης/ Xenokleídēs). [German version] [1] Corinthian naval commander, 5th cent. BC Corinthian. One of five naval commanders sent by Corinth against Corcyra in 433 BC (Thuc. 1,46,2). The fleet achieved a partial victory near the Sybota islands (Thuc. 1,47-54; Diod. 12,33,3 f.). On the return voyage X. captured Anactorium on the Gulf of Ambracia and occupied the town with Corinthian settlers (Thuc. 1,55,1). In 426/5 BC X. led 300 hoplites in defence of Ambracia (Thuc. 3,114,4). Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) Bibliography J. B. Salmon, Wealthy Corinth, 1984, 318 K.-W. Wel…

Xenocles

(633 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Engels, Johannes (Cologne) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Et al.
(Ξενοκλῆς; Xenoklês). [German version] [1] See Little-Master cups See Little-Master cups. Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) [German version] [2] Attic tragic poet, end of 5th cent. BC Attic tragic poet, end of the 5th cent. BC, son of Carcinus [3] (family tree: TrGF I 21, p. 129), frequently mocked in comedy (TrGF I 33 T 1-7); successful at the Dionysia in 415 (DID C 14) with Oedipus, Lycaon, Bacchae and the satyr play Athamas. There is evidence of the further titles Licymnius (one surviving verse, F 2) and possibly Myes (Μύες, Mice) (but cf. TrGF I 21 T 3 d-e). Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) …

Xenocrates

(2,016 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Stanzel, Karl-Heinz (Tübingen) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Et al.
(Ξενοκράτης/ Xenokrátēs). [German version] [1] X. of Acragas, mentioned by Pindar, c. 500 BC Brother of the tyrant Theron of Acragas. Pind. Pyth. 6 refers to X.' victory in chariot-racing at the Pythian Games (Pythia [2]) in 490 BC, and Pind. Isthm. 2 to his charioteering victory at the Isthmian Games (Isthmia) in c. 470 BC. The latter ode was written after X.' death. Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography H. Berve, Die Tyrannis bei den Griechen, 1967, 133; 135. [German version] [2] X. of Chalcedon Academic philosopher, 4th cent. BC Academic philosopher (Academy), 4th cent. BC. Stanzel, Ka…

Xenocritus

(409 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) | Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
(Ξενόκριτος/ Xenókritos). [German version] [1] Choral lyricist of the 7th cent. BC Choral lyricist of the 7th cent. BC from Locri (in lower Italy). In the generation after Terpander he, Thaletas and Xenodamus took part in various musical reforms in Sparta (Plut. De musica 9,1134b-c). Like the other two he was a composer of paeans (Plut. loc.cit.), which were also classed as dithyrambs (Dithyrambos) in Antiquity because of their mythical and heroic subject matter (Plut. De musica 10,1134e; [1. 41], cf. [2. …

Xenodamus

(107 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Ξενόδαμος; Xenódamos). 7th century BC Greek choral lyric poet from Cythera. In the generation after Terpander, together with Thaletas and Xenocritus [1] of Locri he took part in various musical reforms in Sparta (Plut. De musica 9,1134b-c). Like the other two he was a composer of paeans (Plut. ibid.), which in Antiquity were also classified as Hyporchḗmata (Plut. loc.cit.; [1. 82],  cf. [2. 15-17; 3. 99-100; 4. 335]). Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) Bibliography 1 L. Käppel, Paian, 1992 2 Id., Bakchylides und das System der chorlyrischen Gattungen im 5. Jh. v. Chr., in: A.…

Xenodice

(68 words)

Author(s): Goldhahn, Tobias
(Ξενοδίκη; Xenodíkē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Minos A daughter of Minos and Pasiphae or Crete (Apollod. 3,7). Goldhahn, Tobias [German version] [2] (also Xenodoce). Daughter of Syleus (Also Xenodoce). Daughter of Syleus, killed by Heracles [1] (Apollod. 2,132). Goldhahn, Tobias [German version] [3] Trojan prisoner Trojan prisoner in a painting by Polygnotus [1] in the Lesche of the Cnidians in Delphi (Paus. 10,26,1). Goldhahn, Tobias

Xenodicus

(195 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
(Ξενόδικος; Xenódikos). [German version] [1] Uncle of the tyrant Theron of Acragas Son of the Emmenid Telemachus and uncle of Theron of Acragas. His sons Hippocrates and Capys rebelled against Theron in 476 BC, who defeated them at Himera, whereupon they settled in Sicanian Camicus (schol. Pind. P. 6,5a and O. 2,173f-g). Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography H. Berve, Die Tyrannis bei den Griechen, 1967, 135. [German version] [2] From Acragas, second half of the 4th cent. BC X. (also Xenodocus) from Acragas (both forms of the name can be found in Diod. 20,31,4; 32,2; 56…

Xenodikai

(295 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
(ξενοδίκαι/ xenodíkai). [German version] [1] In Athens: 'judges of foreigners' First mentioned in Athens as 'judges of foreigners' (IG I3 439,75 and IG I3 440,126) for the years 444-442 BC in which the xenodikai had to provide quite large sums for the construction of the Parthenon . It cannot be deduced from this evidence [3. 661 f.] that they operated only for a relatively short period after Pericles' [1] statute of civic rights as an authority for lawsuits relating to illegal arrogation of Athenian civil rights (Xenias graph…

Xenodocheion

(320 words)

Author(s): Hahn, Johannes (Münster)
[German version] (ξενοδοχεῖον/ xenodocheîon; Lat. xenodochium). In Late Antiquity, the xenodocheion was a charitable church institution that served as a hostel and a hospital. In the xenodocheion, the Christian tradition of taking in fellow-Christian travellers without payment found an institutionalized form. Unlike the commercially run inns, xenodocheia (which were established, and often endowed as well, by bishops, monasteries and affluent Christian individuals), generally offered accommodation without charge to the needy as lodgings for p…

Xenoetas

(62 words)

Author(s): Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale)
[German version] (Ξενοίτας; Xenoítas) from Achaea. In 221 BC Antiochus [5] III sent him as a stratēgós with full authority against the renegade Molon [1] who defeated him with a ruse after an early victory, despite support from the governors of Susiana and Mesene (Pol. 5,45,6; 46,9-48,9). Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) Bibliography H. H. Schmitt, Untersuchungen zur Geschichte Antiochos' des Großen, 1964, 116; 127-131; 178 f.

Xenoi

(675 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Ameling, Walter (Jena)
(ξένοι/ xénoi). 'Alien', i.e. free-born person not belonging to the Greek citizenship structure, who voluntarily stayed in a place and enjoyed certain rights there. Non-free aliens (slaves, prisoners of war) were not members of the group of xenoi, which was primarily defined in terms of rights. [German version] I. Classical Greece The term xenoi generally describes large groups of free-born people, staying permanently or temporarily in a particular community, without being citizens of it (Thuc. 2,31,1; 2,36,4; 6,30,2; Aristot. Pol. 1300b 31 f.), often used in contrast to ἀστοί/ ast…

Xenombrotus

(151 words)

Author(s): Decker, Wolfgang (Cologne)
[German version] (Ξενόμβροτος/Ξενόνβροτος; Xenómbrotos/Xenónbrotos). According to [1. no. 340], X. was victorious in horse riding (the first from his home island of Cos) at Olympia in 420 BC, while his son Xenodicus [1. no. 363] won in the youth class of boxing in 400 BC. Paus. 6,14,12 describes a shared monument to the two, for which there have been attempts to connect it with IvOl 170. As [2. no. 49] has shown, however, this inscription refers only to the victory of the father, whose father also …

Xenomedes

(94 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
[German version] (Ξενομήδης/ Xenomḗdēs) of Ceos. Logographer of the 5th cent. BC (Dion. Hal. de Thucydide 5). Author of a history of his home island (title unknown!), from which Callimachus [3] (Aetia 3, fr. 75 Pfeiffer) took the famous story of Acontius and Cydippe [1]. Other themes treated by X. are mentioned by Callimachus (fr. 75,54-77, also [1]). X. may also have been used by Aristotle [6] for his Keíōn politeía (fr. 511 Rose, cf. also 611,26-29). Logographos Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography 1 G. Huxley, Xenomedes of Keos, in: GRBS 6, 1965, 235-245. FGrH 442 with comm.

Xenon

(849 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Cologne) | Cobet, Justus (Essen) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) | Hidber, Thomas (Berne) | Baumbach, Manuel (Zürich) | Et al.
(Ξένων/ Xénōn). [German version] [1] From Athens, banker mentioned in Demosthenes, 4th cent. BC Athenian banker of the 4th cent. BC, witness in a lawsuit for property damage ( blábēs díkē ) against Phormion [2] c. 350/49 (Dem. Or. 36,13 and 37). Engels, Johannes (Cologne) Bibliography PA 11322  Traill, PAA 734715  A. R. W. Harrison, The Law of Athens, vol. 2, 1971, 116 f. [German version] [2] Tyrant of Hermione, second half of the 3rd cent. BC Tyrant of Hermion(e), one of the tyrants in the Peloponnese who under pressure from Aratus [2] after the death of the Macedon…

Xenon group

(245 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A special group of South Italian vases, named after a label on a pot in Frankfurt with the charioteer Xenon preparing to start [1]. The decoration of XG vases was applied with red slip to a pot covered with dark glaze (Gnathia ware). The pots (Pottery) used are quite small in scale. Decoration is chiefly limited to ornamentation (Ornaments) such as ivy and laurel branches, rod ornaments, wavy lines, meanders etc.; in contrast, representations of animals or people are distinctly ra…

Xenopeithes

(142 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Cologne)
(Ξενοπείθης/ Xenopeíthēs). [German version] [1] From Athens, c. 400 BC Athenian of the late 5th and early 4th cent. BC, son of Nausimachus from the Paeania deme; won a victory with a boys' chorus at the Thargeliain c. 385-366 (IG II2 1138,20); possibly an uncle of X. [2] (cf. [1]). Traill, PAA 733255. Engels, Johannes (Cologne) Bibliography 1 PA 11263 2 Davies, 415 f. [German version] [2] From Athens, mentioned in Demosthenes, 4th cent. BC Athenian, son of Nausicrates from the Paeania deme; in c. 350-346 BC, he and his brother Nausimachus again sued the sons of their guardia…

Xenophanes

(1,654 words)

Author(s): AL.M. | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Di Marco, Massimo (Fondi Latina)
(Ξενοφάνης/ Xenophánēs). [German version] [1] X. of Colophon Greek poet, philosopher of nature, 6th/5th cent. BC Greek poet, social and religious critic, natural philosopher (6th/5th cents. BC). AL.M. [German version] I. Life and transmission X. must have lived between 570 and 467 BC (these dates reflect adjustments for contradictions in the ancient biographical tradition). According to an autobiographical comment, he lived to be over 90 years old (21 B 8 DK). Ancient doxography connected him to Elea (Velia) and Parmenides. The …

Xenophilus

(338 words)

Author(s): Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) | Harmon, Roger (Basle) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Högemann, Peter (Tübingen)
(Ξενόφιλος/ Xenóphilos). [German version] [1] Comedy writer of the 5th cent. BC Comedy writer of the 5th cent. BC, victorious once at the Lenaia [1. test. 2] and possibly also once at the Dionysia [1. test. 1]; neither play titles nor fragments survive. Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG VII, 1989, 803. [German version] [2] X. of Chalcidice Pythagorean and music theorist, c. 400 BC Pupil of Philolaus [2] (Diog. Laert. 8,46) and one of the last of the Pythagoreans (Iambl. v.P. 251; cf. Pythagoras [2]). X. was thought remarkable in Antiquity prim…

Xenophon

(5,032 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Schütrumpf, Eckart E. (Boulder, CO) | Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Et al.
(Ξενοφῶν; Xenophôn). [German version] [1] Of Athens, strategos, 5th cent. BC Athenian. Initially commander of the cavalry ( hippárchēs; IG I3 511); then participated in the campaign against Samos in 441/40 BC as stratēgós (Androtion FGrH 324 F 38), was also stratēgós the following years and operated as such in Thrace in 430/429. He was treated with hostility due to his unauthorized acceptance of the capitulation of Potidaea (Thuc. 2,70), but remained in office and fell as stratēgós at Spartolus in the summer of 429 during a campaign against the Chalcidians and Bottians (…

Xenophron

(90 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Cologne)
[German version] (Ξενόφρων/ Xenóphrōn). 4th cent. BC Athenian living as one of the hetaíroi of Philippus [I 4] II at his court in Pella [1], son of Phaedria (according to Xen. Hell. 2,3,2 one of the 'Thirty', Triákonta , of 404/3, but in Dem. Or. 19,196, it is his father Phaedimus that is mentioned). X. organized a symposium in Pella in 346 for the Athenian ambassadors to negotiate the Peace of Philocrates [2] (but Aeschin. Leg. 157 names the host as Xenodocus). Engels, Johannes (Cologne) Bibliography PA 11295 Traill, PAA 733980.

Xerogypsos

(38 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Ξηρόγυψος; Xērógypsos). Small river near Perinthus in southeatern Thrace (Anna Komnena, Alexias 7, 378,14 Niebuhr; Theophylaktos Simokattes 6,245,2 Bekker), presumably modern Çorlusuyu  (in Turkey). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography C. Danov, s. v. X., RE 9 A, 2094.

Xerxene

(46 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Ξερξήνη; Xerxḗnē). Region in Greater Armenia (cf. Armenia A.) on the upper reaches of the Euphrates (Str. 11,14,5; Plin. HN 5,83: Derzene; Steph. Byz. s. v. Καμβυσήνη; s. v. Ξ.) in the plain around modern Tercan. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography H. Treidler, s. v. X., RE 9 A, 2094-2096.

Xerxes

(685 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) | Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) | Eder, Walter (Berlin)
(Ξέρξης/ Xérxēs; Old Persian Xšayāršā, 'ruling over heroes'). [German version] [1] X. I Achaemenid great king (486-465 BC), son of Darius [1] I and Atossa [1]. 'Born in the purple', X. was designated by his father as his successor (XPf 31 ff. = [6. 81-85]; Hdt. 7,2 f.; Porphyrogénnētos ). At the beginning of his reign he defeated an uprising in Egypt (Hdt. 7,3), and later the rebellions of Šamaš-Erība and Bēl-Šimmanni in Babylonia [3. 361 ff.]. A campaign to Greece (in 480/79 BC) - about which only accounts from the…

Xestes

(129 words)

Author(s): Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
[German version] (ξέστης/ xéstēs). From the turn from the 3rd cent. BC to the 2nd onwards, the term xestes is recorded as a Greek term for the Roman sextarius , a fluid and dry measure of capacity (=  c. 0.546 l) corresponding to 1/48 of an amphora [2], 1/6 of a congius or 2 heminae , 4 quartarii and 12 cyathi . In late Antiquity Egypt, 72 xestai/ sextarii corresponded to an artábē, which was subdivided into 48 choínikes. Hence a choínix can be equated with 11/2 xestai/ sextarii. Sextarius (with table) Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim) Bibliography 1 H. Chantraine, s. v. X., RE 9 A, 210…
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