Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Pacuvius

(912 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
Roman writer of tragedies in the Republican period, of Oscan-Messapian origin, nephew of Ennius (Plin. HN 35,19). [German version] A. Biography Born in 220 BC (cf. Cic. Brut. 229) in Brundisium (Jer. Chron. p. 142 H.), died shortly before 130 BC in Tarentum. Apart from this chronology, which comes from Accius' Didascalica and Varro’s De poetis [18. 48f., 53, 62] and has been preserved in works from Sueton’s De poetis [17. 36] to Jerome, there are traces of another tradition, which was perhaps shaped by Cornelius Nepos’ [2] Chronica. [2. 8, 5], which P.took up a generation later (…

Paduans

(189 words)

Author(s): Klose, Dietrich (Munich)
[German version] Paduans were imitations of large Roman bronze coins (sestertia and medaillons), dating from the 16th cent. AD. Padua was one of the manufacturing centres, hence their name . Some are exact copies, others variations from the original and others completely made-up (e.g. sestertia of Otho). The best known paduans are those by the Paduan goldsmith and medallist Giovanni Cavino (1500-1570). Fifty four of his coin punches are preserved in the Cabinet des Médailles in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris [4.111-124]. It has been a matter of debate since Cavino’s …

Padus

(427 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] The largest river in Italy, present-day Po, which was equated with the mythical Eridanus ( fluminum rex Eridanus, Verg. G. 1,482; sacer Eridanus, Sil. Pun. 12,696; pater Eridanus, Sil. Pun. 4,691); it was known locally as P. and Bodincus (Metrodorus FGrH 184 F 8). It flows for a distance of 570 km from west to east through the whole of Gallia Cisalpina (Pianura Padana) which it divides into Cispadana in the south and Transpadana in the north. (The regional reforms of Augustus created Liguria and Aemilia in …

Padusa

(112 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Marshy region on the river Eridanus, which had originated from a southern arm of the Padus (Po) in the period of Early History and had dried up in the Roman period. The fossil river bed was used in the construction of the fossa Augusta , the navigable canal between Padus and Classis which was the port for Ravenna (cf. Plin. HN 3,119). P. is associated with the myth of Phaethon and Cycnus [3] (Diod. Sic.5,23,3). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography L. Gambi, Cosa era la Padusa, 1950  G. Uggeri, La Romanizzazione dell'antico Delta Padano, 1975, 49  Id., Insediamenti, viab…

Paean

(1,081 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Doric, later generally widespread Παιάν/ Paián; epic Παιήων/ Paiḗōn; Ionic-Attic Παιών/ Paiṓn; Aeolian Πάων/ Páōn; Lat. paean). Term for a Greek song genre as well as a god, later an epithet for various gods. The etymology of the word is obscure [1; 2; 3]. Modern treatises on the song genre paean usually make the identity of the name for the song and the god the starting-point of their considerations. Either the god was a personification of the call [4; 5] drawn from the impersonal cry ἰὴ παιάν ( iḕ paián) or there was originally a god Paean to whom the cry ἰὴ Παιάν ( iḕ Paián) was …

Paeania

(198 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Παιανία/ Paianía). Great Attic mesogeia deme of the phyle Pandionis in Liopesi (today again P.), divided into Upper P. (Π. καθύπερθεν/ P. kathýperthen) with one bouleutḗs and Lower P. (Π. ὑπένερθεν/ P. Hypénerthen) with eleven bouleutaí (Harpocr. s.v. Παιανιεῖς). In 307/6 BC, Upper P. changed over to Antigonis. The deme decree IG I3 250 (450/430 BC; FO: Liopesi) [2. 385 No. 83] of Lower P., which mentions a quorum of 100 dēmótai [2. 95], attests to the harvest festival of Pr(o)ērosía [2. 196f.] and hieropoioí ('cult officials') [2. 142, 183]. For the cult of …

Paederasty

(591 words)

Author(s): Hartmann, Elke (Berlin)
(παιδεραστία/ paiderastía). [German version] A. Definition Paederasty was a form of homosexuality practiced in Greece among men of a certain age. A 12 to 18 year old 'youth' (παῖς/ paîs) would be the 'beloved' (ἐρώμενος/ erṓmenos) of a man older than 30, the 'lover' (ἐραστής/ erastḗs), who would also educate him. Modern scholars asses the sexual and pedagogic aspects of paederasty variously; they explain it alternatively as a pedagogically embellished sexual relationship or as an erotically tinged education, focusing on teaching martial competency and the virtue  (ἀρετή/ aretḗ) of …

Paelex

(65 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] From a statement by the Roman jurist, Paul (Dig. 50,16,144) the meaning of paelex (also pelex, pellex, different in Greek pallakḗ ) is that of a female partner to whom one is not married (i.e not uxor, Marriage III.C.). The legal status of paelex was treated in Roman law mainly in the context of concubinage ( concubinatus ). Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)

Paeligni

(344 words)

Author(s): de Vido, Stefania (Venice)
[German version] Italian tribe in the Appennines midway along the river Aternus in the neighbourhood of the Vestini, Marrucini, Marsi [1] and Frentani (Str. 5,2,1; 5,3,4; 5,3,11; Liv. 9,19,4; 26,11,11). They inhabited a cold (Hor. Carm. 3,19,8; Ov. Tr. 4,10,3) and water-rich mountain region (Ov. Am. 2,1,1). Together with the Vestini they had access to the sea by means of the Aternus (Str. 5,4,2); moreover the coast around Hortona and the mouth of the Sarus (Ptol. 3,1,19) were also regarded as Pael…

Paenula

(233 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman cape of different lengths, produced from a semi-circular cut. It was sewn together at the front, had an opening for the head to slip in and a sewn-on hood. If required, the seam at the front could be unpicked from the bottom end in order to give the arms more room to move. The paenula was made of leather, linen or (sheep's) wool and was worn by men and women of all classes, slaves and soldiers, in particular as a travelling and bad-weather coat for protection against the cold and rain; it was white or gray, or dyed in various sh…

Paeones, Paeonia

(200 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Παίονες/ Paíones, Παιονία/ Paionía). Large tribe under its own king, inhabiting the north of the area later known as Macedonia, particularly in the valley of the Axius and the surrounding mountain regions as far as the Strymon (Thuc. 2,98,2; Str. 7,5,1). Hom. Il. 848-50 knew of the P. as friends of the Trojans; in c. 500 BC, the P. around Lake Prasias were temporarily deported to Phrygia by the Persian Megabazus (Hdt. 5,16) [1]. In 359 BC, P. attacked the Macedonians, but they were defeated and subjugated by Philip [4] II (Diod. Sic…

Paeonia

(147 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (παιωνία/ paiōnía, Latin paeonia or glycyside, cf. Isid. Orig. 17,9,48, Paeonia officinalis Rtz.). The red- or white-flowered peony was cultivated not for its beautiful blooms but for its alleged therapeutic effect. According to Dioscorides (3,140 Wellmann = 3,147 Berendes) the plant was called e.g. γλυκυσίδη ( glykysídē), but the root was called paiōnía, perhaps after the god of healing Apollo Paionios (cf. [1. 100]). The root is eaten to promote menstruation and post-natal purification, drunk in wine it is allegedly helpful e.g. …

Paeonidae

(58 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Παιονίδαι/ Paionídai). Attic mesogeia deme of the Leontis phyle on the Parnes, with three bouleutaí. According to Hdt. 5,62, the fortress of Leipsydrium (which has not yet been located), was above P. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography Traill, Attica, 47, 62, 68, table 4  J.S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 55, 63, 130  Whitehead, Index s.v. P.

Paeonius

(269 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(Παιώνιος; Paiṓnios). [German version] [1] Greek sculptor from Mende, 5th cent. BC Sculptor from Mende. The only known surviving original work by P. is a statue of Nike on a triangular pillar in front of the Temple of Zeus in Olympia, which according to its inscription and a statement by Pausanias (5,26,1) was dedicated by the Messenians. Pausanias suggests that the occasion of the dedication was a victory in 455 BC, whereas the inscription points to the victory of Sphacteria (425 BC); on stylistic grounds …

Paerisades

(622 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
(Παιρισάδης/ Pairisádēs, Παρισάδης/ Parisádēs, Βηρισάδης/ Bērisádēs). Royal name of Iranian origin among the Bosporanean Spartocids (Spartocus) and the Thracian Odrysae. [German version] [1] P. I. Ruler of the Regnum Bosporanum Ruler of the  Regnum Bosporanum, son of Leucon [3] I., 'árchōn of the Sindi, of all Maeotae, Thataeans and Dosci' [1. no. 8], husband of Kamasarye. P. ruled from  349/8-344 BC together with his brothers Spartocu II. and Apollonius, dividing the territory of the kingdom between themselves. In 347/6, a trade agreement with Athens was renewed by them (Syll.3 …

Paestan ware

(394 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] PW first developed in around 360 BC when immigrant artists from Sicily founded a new workshop in the southern Italian city of Paestum (Poseidonia), the leading masters of which were the vase painters Asteas and Python. Both are the only vase painters in southern Italy whose signatures are known on vases. The Paestan vase painters favoured bell craters, neck amphorae, hydrias, lebetes gamikoi (nuptial cauldrons depicting mostly wedding but also funeral scenes), lekanides (cosmetic/trinket containers), lekythoi (one-handled flasks for perfumed oil) and jug…

Paestum

(6 words)

see Poseidonia, Paistos, Paestum

Paestum

(1,940 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] The polis of Poseidonia, founded in the late 7th cent. BC by colonists from Sybaris, was transformed into a Roman veterans colony named Paestum ( P.) in 274/3 BC, with profound consequences for its urban profile and the social composition of its populace. Early in the Roman Imperial period, it began to fall increasingly into decline, firstly because of the new north-south major travel routes which now bypassed it, and secondly because the plain to the south of Salerno, already ment…

Paesus

(126 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Παισός; Paisós). Town in the Troas (Hom. Il. 2,822; 5,612), probably founded by the Milesians (Str. 13,1,19). P. was linked with the sea via the river of the same name. The position of P. is presumed to be near Fanar, north-east of modern Çardak [1. 99]. The neighbouring cities were Lampsacus and Parium, which like P. were conquered in 497 BC by Daurises, the son-in-law of Darius [1] I (Hdt. 5,117). In the Delian League, P. paid 1,000 drachmas (ATL 3,26, No. 135). At the time of S…

Paetus

(94 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] [1] Roman cognomen Roman cognomen meaning 'slightly cross-eyed', for instance describing a squint (Cic. Nat. D. 1,80; Hor. Sat. 1,3, 44f. among others). A genetic trait in the families of the Aelii from the 4th cent. BC (Aelius [I 7-11]) and the Autronii in the 1st cent. (Autronius [I 8]); also an epithet for Cicero's friend L. Papirius [I 22] P. More widespread in the Imperial period. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Degrassi, FCIR, 261 2 Kajanto, Cognomina, 239. [German version] [2] P. Clodius [II 15] Thrasea Paetus see P. Clodius [II 15] Thrasea Paetus
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