Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Pallantium

(168 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Macedonia, Macedones (Παλλάντειον/ Pallánteion, lit. Παλλάντιον/ Pallántion). City on the western edge of the eastern Arcadian plain, 7 km south of Tripoli, with a few remains on a hill that juts out from the Kravari mountain range (earlier Boreion), today P. again (formerly Berbati). Remains of the acropolis wall and of four temples from the Archaic and Classical periods [1] are preserved. P. was an independent city in the 4th and 2nd cents. BC despite its incorporation in the synoikismós of Megalopol…

Pallas

(560 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) | Parker, Robert (Oxford)
[German version] [1] Attic hero (Πάλλας/ Pállas). Attic hero, eponym of Pallene [3], son of Pandion [1], brother of Aegeus, Lycus [8] and Nisus [1]. After Pandion's death, the brothers divided up Attica, with Aegeus as its king. P. and his 50 sons wanted to usurp the rule but were killed by Aegeus' son Theseus (cf. Soph. TrGF 4 F 24; Philochorus FGrH 328 F 107; schol. Lys. 58; schol. Aristoph. Vesp. 1223; Apollod. Epit. 1,11; Apollod. 3,206; the battle and defeat of P. are described in Diod. Sic. 4,60; Apollod. Epit. 1,11; Paus. 1,22,2; 1,28,10; Hyg. Fab. 244; Plut. Theseus 13). Käppel, Lutz (Ki…

Pallene

(683 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel) | Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) | Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)
(Παλλήνη/ Pallḗnē). [German version] [1] Daughter of the giant Alcyoneus Also called Palene (Παλήνη/ Palḗnē): Suda s.v. Ἀλκυονίδες ἡμέραι. According to Hegesander (or Agesander: FHG 4, 422, fr. 46), daughter of the giant Alcyoneus [1], who, along with her sisters (Alcyonides [2]), threw herself into the ocean from the Canastraeum, only to be turned into a kingfisher ( alkyṓn, after her father) by Amphitrite (Suda l.c.; Eust. ad Hom. Il. 1,563, p. 776,33-39 (according to Pausanias); Apostolius Paroemiographus 2,20). Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliography P.M.C. Forbes Irving, Metamo…

Pallia

(56 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] (the modern Paglia). Right tributary of the Tiber which at Volsinii (the modern Orvieto) is joined by the Clanis flowing from Clusium.  A harbour (Pagliano) is formed where it flows into the Tiber. A station Pallia was situated on the via Cassia between Volsinii and Clusium (Tab. Peut. 4,5). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Palliata

(415 words)

Author(s): Blänsdorf, Jürgen (Mainz)
[German version] A term used by Varro - but not documented until Late Antiquity, by a quotation in Diom. 1,489,18 K - for Roman comedy based on Greek models (from the Latin pallium for himátion, the cloak-like wrap that was typical of traditional Greek dress, cf. Plaut. Curc. 288; in contrast to the togata, the comedy in the Roman toga); up to the end of the Republic mention was made only of comoedia or more generally of fabula. The literary theory of Late Antiquity (Diomedes [4], Donatus [3], Euanthius) provides valuable approaches to describing the genre. The first palliata was written by…

Pallium

(234 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A Roman cloak, corresponding to the Greek himation, of a rectangular length of material; fabrics used were wool, linen and silk. Pallia could be variously coloured (white, diverse shades of red, yellowish, black) with gold brocade or purple stripes. They are known from the 3rd cent. BC and were initially worn only by friends of Greek culture, e.g. philosophers (Liv. 29,10); but they quite soon enjoyed the greatest popularity because they were comfortable and simple to wear (cf. Suet. Aug. 40) and were…

Palma

(82 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Commerce | Hispania, Iberia City in Maiorica (modern Majorca), the largest of the Baliares Islands, founded in 122 BC after a victory over the local inhabitants by the consul Caecilius [I 19], subsequently Baliaricus, and named after the palm of victory (Str. 3,5,1; Mela 2,124; Plin. HN 3,77f.; Ptol. 2,6,78). It has the same name today. Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography Tovar 2,3, 1989, 277  TIR K/J 31 Tarraco, 1997, 117.

Palmaria

(61 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Volcanic island in the Mare Tyrrhenum , the modern Palmarola (province of Latina). From north to south, it measures 3.5 km at a maximum elevation of 253 m. P. is the westernmost of the insulae Pontiae (Pontia [2]; Varro Rust. 3,5,7; Plin. HN 3,81). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography G.M. De Rossi (ed.), Le isole pontine attraverso i tempi, 1986.

Palmette

(4 words)

see Ornaments

Palm tree

(6 words)

see Phoenix [6]

Palmus

(84 words)

Author(s): Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
[German version] Roman measure of length ('palm'; cf. the Greek palaistḗ) of 4 digiti, corresponding to 1/4 foot and a length of c. 74 mm (cf. Vitr. De arch. 3,1,8: "relinquitur pes quattuor palmorum, palmus autem habet quattuor digitos."). Like digitus ('finger width') and pes ('foot') this unit of length is based on the proportions of the human body. Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim) Bibliography 1 F. Hultsch, Griechische und römische Metrologie, 21882, 74f. 2 H. Nissen, Griechische und römische Metrologie (Handbuch der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft 1), 21892, 842f.

Palmyra

(2,557 words)

Author(s): Niehr, Herbert (Tübingen) | Kaizer, Ted (Oxford)
This item can be found on the following maps: Achaemenids | Syria | Theatre | Caesar | Zenobia | | Coloniae | Commerce | India, trade with | Limes | Aegean Koine (Πάλμυρα/ Pálmyra, Semitic Tadmor). [German version] I. History Oasis in central Syria, c. 240 km north-east of Damascus and c. 200 km west of the Euphrates. P., from which routes led to Emesa (Ḥimṣ), Ḥamāh and Aleppo, was an important caravan station on the route from Mesopotamia to central Syria, Lebanon and Arabia. This made P. one of the richest and most influential cities in Syria from the 1st to the 3rd cents. AD. Epigraphically, P.…

Palmyrene

(175 words)

Author(s): Voigt, Rainer (Berlin)
[German version] Language of the more than 2000 inscriptions from Palmyra (Palmyrene Tdm( w) r) and Dura-Europus from the 1st cent. BC to AD 273 (end of the Palmyrene empire). Together with closely related eastern Aramaic dialects (like Edessenian Syriac and Aramaic of Ḥaṭra), Palmyrene is a continuation of supraregional Official Aramaic. The most important document is the Greek-Palmyrene list of customs and tax tariffs  (AD 137), which constitutes the longest north-western Semitic epigraphical monument with …

Paludamentum

(262 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Rectangularly cut, mostly purple but also red or white, Roman cloak of linen or wool, corresponding to the Greek chlamys; Agrippina's gold-braided paludamentum is, however, unusual (Plin. HN. 33,63). Initially paludamenta were worn only by Roman generals and other high-ranking officers; they advanced in the imperial period to insignia of Imperial ruling power. Paludamenta were part of the battle dress of generals and emperors (cf. Varro Ling. 7,37) and were not to be worn within the limits of the city of Rome (Tac. Hist. 2,89); thu…

Pambotadae

(93 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Παμβοτάδαι/ Pambotádai). Attic Paralia (?) deme of the phyle of Erechtheis, from 127/8 AD of the phyle of Hadrianis. Before 307/6 BC, P. took it in turn with Sybridae to provide one bouleutḗs and after 224/3 BC two bouleutaí. Location unknown. Rock inscriptions in the upper Vari valley at Thiti cannot be read as ὅρ(ος) Π(α)μ(βοτάδων)/ hór(os) P(a)m(botádōn) [1; 2. 118]. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography 1 H. Lohmann, Atene, 1993, 58 2 J.S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 118, 126. Traill, Attica, 6, 14f., 38, 59, 62, 69, 100f., 111 nr. 102, table 1, 15.

Pamenches

(62 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] Son of Pachom; c. 50/30 B.C. syngenḗs and stratēgós (Court titles B. 2.) in various Egyptian nomes. Along with his government offices P. held a series of indigenous priestly offices, which already appear in the titles of his father. PP III 5688; VIII 292 b. Ameling, Walter (Jena) Bibliography L. Mooren, The Aulic Titulature in Ptolemaic Egypt, 1975, 121f. Nr. 0128.

Pamisus

(240 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Lienau, Cay (Münster) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
(Παμισός; Pamisós). [German version] [1] Main River of the Region of Messana [2] Main river of the region of Messana [2], fed by three source rivers in the upper Messenian plain. In Antiquity the strong springs of Hagios Floros in the lower Messenian plain were considered to be the starting-point of the P., whence the river was called P. only from that point on. It is the river with most constantly abundant flow in the Peloponnese, and is navigable by boat a short distance from the mouth. At the Hagios Floros springs there was a sanctuary to P. with a small Doric templum in antis from the 6th cent…

Pammenes

(478 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne) | Dreyer, Boris (Göttingen)
(Παμμένης; Pamménēs). [German version] [1] Close friend of Epaminondas Theban, close friend of Epaminondas. On his second Peloponnesian campaign, Epaminondas entrusted the still young P. with garrisoning Sicyon (Polyaenus, Strat. 5,16,3), and in 368 BC with a mission to protect Megalopolis (Paus. 8,27,2). From 368 to 365, Philippus [4] II, who was about the same age as P., stayed as a hostage in the house of P.' parents ([1. 118] with bibliography). After the death of Epaminondas at Mantinea, P. became a…

Pammon

(38 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Πάμμων). Son of Priamus and Hecabe (Hom. Il. 24,250; Apollod. 3,151; Quint. Smyrn. 6,317; 562; 568; in Hyg. fab. 90 Pammon (…

Pamphila

(309 words)

Author(s): Baumbach, Manuel (Zürich)
[German version] (Παμφίλη; Pamphílē) of Epidaurus. Important female philologist and writer at the time of Emperor Nero (mid-1st cent. AD); presumably the daughter of the grammarian Soteridas [1. 58-61; 2. 310-312]. Of her writings, only 10 fragments are extant from the main work, the Ἱστορικὰ ὑπομνήματα ( Historikà hypomnḗmata, 'Historical Memoirs') that comprised 33 bks. (FHG 3, 520-522). Of the other works, among which there were several Epitomaí, Suda mentions Περὶ ἀμφισβητήσεων ('On Controversies'), Περὶ ἀφροδισίων ('On Sexual Pleasures') and an epitome …
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