Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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P.

(73 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] is used as an abbreviation of the Roman name Publius and very often appears on coins and in inscriptions to stand for functions and titles (e.g. PM = pontifex maximus; PP = pater patriae). For the numerous meanings of P in numismatics and epigraphics see [1. 310-319] and [2. XLIV-XLIX]. Eder, Walter (Berlin) Bibliography 1 A. Calderini, Epigrafia, 1974 2 H.Cohen, J.C. Egbert, R. Cagnat, Coin-Inscriptions and Epigraphical Abbreviations of Imperial Rome, 1978.

Pabulatores

(4 words)

see Logistics

Pacatianus

(5 words)

see Claudius[II 46]

Pacatus

(233 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] Latinus P. Drepanius, a rhetor from the region around Bordeaux, lived in the 4th/5th cents. AD and in 390 attained the proconsulship of Africa. He was a friend of  Ausonius and Symmachus, presumably also of  Paulinus [5] of Nola. In 389 P. held a panegyric on the emperor  Theodosius I. In this there was an especially striking accumulation of exempla from the Roman tradition with which P. probably wanted to do justice to the dignity of the res publica [8. 57-61]: P. sees the Roman concept of humanitas realised in the person of Theodosius. Despite …

Paccia

(67 words)

Author(s): Franke, Thomas (Bochum)
[German version] P. Marciana was from Africa (Leptis Magna?); from c. AD 175 she was the first wife of  Septimius Severus (SHA Sept. Sev. 3,2) and died in about AD 185 ([1. nos. 410, 411]; CIL VIII 19494 = ILS 440). Franke, Thomas (Bochum) Bibliography 1 J.M. Reynolds (ed.), The Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitana, 1952. A.R. Birley, Septimius Severus, 21988, 52; 75; 225  PIR2 P 20  Raepsaet-Charlier, 590.

Paccius

(264 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[German version] [1] C.P. Africanus Senator Senator. In probably 67 he became a suffect consul. In 70 he was expelled from the Senate for being found guilty of informing on the Scribonii brothers under Nero [1] (Tac. Hist. 4,41,3). But he must have been readmitted soon after, because in 77/8 he served as proconsul of Africa; there are numerous testimonies to his activities there. PIR2 P 14. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography Thomasson, Fasti Africani, 44. [German version] [2] P. Antiochus Pharmacologist in Rome, 1st cent. Pharmacologist, active in Rome, who had great therapeutic…

Paches

(127 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne)
[German version] (Πάχης/ Páchēs). Athenian, son of Epicurus, sent in late autumn 428 BC as a  stratēgós with 1000 hoplites against the disloyal city of Mytilene, which he captured after several months of siege (Thuc. 3,18,3-3,28; Diod. Sic. 12,55,5-10). After operations off the Ionian coast, he also subjugated Antissa, Pyrrha and Eresus (Thuc. 3,28,3; 35,1-2), all on Lesbos [1. 171f.]. On his return, P. was indicted in Athens (at the instigation of Cleon [1]). (The accusation, expressed in Anth. Pal. 7,614, of …

Pachom

(69 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] (also called Hierax). Son of Pachom (PP VIII 300b), father of Pamenches, attested as syngenḗs and stratēgós in various Egyptian nomes c. 50/30 BC. Besides his state offices, P. held a number of indigenous priestly offices, which subsequently also appear in the titles of his son. PP I/VIII 265; 301. Ameling, Walter (Jena) Bibliography L. Mooren, The Aulic Titulature in Ptolemaic Egypt, 1975, 119f. Nr. 0127.

Pachomius

(296 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] (Παχώμιος; Pachmios). P. was born in AD 292, probably in Latopolis/Esna, and died of the plague in AD 346. He is regarded as the founder of cenobitic monasticism in Egypt and the author of the first regulations for monks. The Pachomian monastic community, which he founded, is called koinóbion (in the sense of koinōnía, 'community') throughout the Vita prima [2. 24]. P. was born into a pagan Egyptian family and converted to Christianity around the age of twenty when he enrolled in the army. He was baptised after he had returned to the tow…

Pachrates

(85 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Παχράτης/ Pachrátēs). Magician and prophet from Heliopolis [1], proved his craft to emperor Hadrian with the help of a smoke sacrifice to Selene, in recognition of which he received double his fee (PGM 1, P 4,2446ff.). P. may have served as inspiration for the figure of the magician Pancrates in Lucian. Philopseudes 34-36 [1] and is perhaps identical [2. 618f.] with the poet Pancrates [3]. Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliography 1 K. Preisendanz, s.v. P., RE 18, 2071-2074 2 F. Stoessl, s.v. Pankrates (5), RE 18, 615-619.

Pachymeres, Georgios

(245 words)

Author(s): Wolfram, Gerda (Vienna)
[German version] (Γεώργιος ὁ Παχυμέρης; Geṓrgios ho Pachymérēs). Byzantine universal scholar and humanist, born in 1242 in Nicaea [5], died around 1310. P. held high Church and state offices ( prōtékdikos and dikaiophýlax). He studied philosophy, rhetoric, mathematics and physics with Georgios Akropolites. His important history in 13 volumes [1] deals with events in the period between 1255 and 1308 and is the only extensive historical work from the time of the Palaeologi dynasty. In addition to books on rhetoric and philosophy…

Pachynus

(236 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Falco, Giulia (Athens)
[German version] (Πάχυνος/ Páchynos). Promontory in the extreme south-east of Sicily (more precisely: 8 km northeast from there), today's Capo Pássero, 5 km southeast of today's Pachino. P. was of great importance for navigation as a landmark and measuring point (cf. Str. 2,4,3: distance from Crete; 6,2,11: from Malta; Plin. HN 3,87: from the Peloponnese). Because of the way the island was thought to be orientated, in antiquity P. was usually referred to as the east cape (Str. 6,2,1; Plin. HN 3,87;…

Pacianus

(130 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] After AD 343, bishop of Barcinona (modern Barcelona), died before 393; of his life practically nothing is known. Three letters from him to the Novatian Sympronianus survive, in which he opposes Novatianism (Novatianus) (CPL 561), also a pamphlet Paraenesis sive Exhortatorius Libellus ad Paenitentiam ( Exhortation to Penitence, CPL 562) and a Sermo de Baptismo ( Sermon on Baptism, CPL 563). A Cerv(ul)us ('Stag') against the pagan celebration of the new year, mentioned by Hieronymus  (Vir. ill. 106), is lost. The author was well educated and t…

Paconius

(300 words)

Author(s): Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Name of an Italian gens, attested in Setia (consequently Oscan? ILS 6130) and several trading towns. I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] (P.) Lepta, Q. Friend of Cicero and his praefectus fabrum in Cilicia, 51-50 BC Friend of Cicero and his praefectus [7] fabrum in Cilicia 51-50 BC (Cic. Fam. 3,7,4; 5,20,4 et passim). Cic. Fam. 9,13,1-3 points to Cales in Campania as his homeland, where ILS 5779 must attest himself or a son (on the identity [1. 6]). P. often appears in Cicero's letters (e.g. as addressee of Fam. 6,18-19), for the last time in November 44 (Att. 16,15,3). Fündling, Jörg …

Pacorus

(369 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] [1] Member of the Parthian royal house P. (not P. I!), a son of Orodes [2] II; he is central to the first phase of the  Parthian Wars which followed the battle of Carrhae. In 53 BC, P. got engaged to a sister of the Armenian king Artavasdes [2] II, sealing the latter's coming over to the Parthian side. The Parthian invasion of Syria (51-50) was only nominally under the leadership of P., who was still young.  He played a greater part in the great attack on Syria, carried out under his command from 41 onward, but after initial success he died at Gindarus in 38 BC. Parthia Schottky, Mart…

Pactio

(252 words)

Author(s): Kehne, Peter (Hannover)
[German version] In the Roman 'law of nations' p. generally meant (to be precise pactum < pacisci; synonymous  conventio: [1. 136f.]) interstatal agreements without reference to the current legal format (Gell. 1,25,15; Gai. Inst. 3,94; Dig. 49,15,12, compare 2,14,5; Liv. 34,57,7), in the plural it also referred to their content. Given that fides [II.] publica operated in them, the observance of which signified the compliance with the ius gentium (s. ius A. 2.) as a norm of the 'law of nations' ([1. 36]; [2. 6; 11f.]; [4. 75]), the maxim: pacta servanda sunt (agreements should be ob…

Pactolus

(126 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Πακτωλός/ Paktōlós). River in Lydia, originates at the Tmolus mountianrange (Boz Dağları), flows through Sardis and into the Hermus [2]; modern-day Sart Çayı. It was famous for the electron and gold dust washed out near the source (Hdt. 1,93,1; 5,101,2; Plin. HN 5,110), to which the Mermnad kings (Mermnadae) owed their legendary wealth (Archil. fr. 22 D.; Hdt. 6,125). Smelteries were located on the P. in Sardis. By the 1st cent. BC the gold of the P. was exhausted, it seems (Str. 13,1,23; 4,5). Quartz sand containing gold was also found in neighbouring streams. Kaletsch, …

Pactum

(1,006 words)

Author(s): Halbwachs, Verena Tiziana (Vienna)
[German version] A. Concept Pactum is a formless arrangement, an agreement with varying content (Dig. 2,14; Cod. Iust. 2,3); cf. Dig. 2,14,1, 1-2: “Pactum autem a pactione dicitur (inde etiam pacis nomen appellatum est) et est pactio duorum pluriumve in idem placitum et consensus ”- "Pactum, a formless agreement, is derived from the word pactio (hence the expression pax, peace, is also coined) and pactio is the agreement and the consent between two or more people concerning the same thing". In the realm of unauthorized actions, the original meaning of pactum was that of an atonement …

Pactumeius

(358 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] [1] Q. Aurelius P. Clemens Senator from Africa, 2nd cent. AD He was admitted to the Senate by Vespasian and Titus as a praetor and was one of the first senators from Africa. His brother is P. [3]. PIR2 P 36. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] P.P.Clemens Roman senator and lawyer Roman senator, lawyer and descendant of P. [1]. ILS 1067 from Cirta, his home town, sets out his cursus honorum ; it led him via the praetorship, a cura for the tax assessment of Syrian municipalities ( ad rationes civitatium Syriae putandas) to the praetorian governorship of Cilicia, duri…

Pactye

(89 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Πακτύη/ Paktýē). Fortress on the Propontic coast of Chersonesus [1], to the south of present-day Bolayır Iskelesi (Ps.-Scyl. 67; Str. 7a,1,52; 54; 56). Here stood the east end of the wall which ran from Miltiades [1] via the Chersonesus [1] to Cardia (Hdt. 6,36; Scymn. 711). Alcibiades [3] retreated here in 407 BC after the loss of his position as strategos (Nep. Alcibiades 7,4; Diod. Sic. 13,74,2). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography Müller 2, 895f.  B. Isaak, The Greek Settlements in Thrace until the Macedonian Conquest, 1988.

Pacuvius

(912 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
Roman writer of tragedies in the Republican period, of Oscan-Messapian origin, nephew of Ennius (Plin. HN 35,19). [German version] A. Biography Born in 220 BC (cf. Cic. Brut. 229) in Brundisium (Jer. Chron. p. 142 H.), died shortly before 130 BC in Tarentum. Apart from this chronology, which comes from Accius' Didascalica and Varro’s De poetis [18. 48f., 53, 62] and has been preserved in works from Sueton’s De poetis [17. 36] to Jerome, there are traces of another tradition, which was perhaps shaped by Cornelius Nepos’ [2] Chronica. [2. 8, 5], which P.took up a generation later (…

Paduans

(189 words)

Author(s): Klose, Dietrich (Munich)
[German version] Paduans were imitations of large Roman bronze coins (sestertia and medaillons), dating from the 16th cent. AD. Padua was one of the manufacturing centres, hence their name . Some are exact copies, others variations from the original and others completely made-up (e.g. sestertia of Otho). The best known paduans are those by the Paduan goldsmith and medallist Giovanni Cavino (1500-1570). Fifty four of his coin punches are preserved in the Cabinet des Médailles in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris [4.111-124]. It has been a matter of debate since Cavino’s …

Padus

(427 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] The largest river in Italy, present-day Po, which was equated with the mythical Eridanus ( fluminum rex Eridanus, Verg. G. 1,482; sacer Eridanus, Sil. Pun. 12,696; pater Eridanus, Sil. Pun. 4,691); it was known locally as P. and Bodincus (Metrodorus FGrH 184 F 8). It flows for a distance of 570 km from west to east through the whole of Gallia Cisalpina (Pianura Padana) which it divides into Cispadana in the south and Transpadana in the north. (The regional reforms of Augustus created Liguria and Aemilia in …

Padusa

(112 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Marshy region on the river Eridanus, which had originated from a southern arm of the Padus (Po) in the period of Early History and had dried up in the Roman period. The fossil river bed was used in the construction of the fossa Augusta , the navigable canal between Padus and Classis which was the port for Ravenna (cf. Plin. HN 3,119). P. is associated with the myth of Phaethon and Cycnus [3] (Diod. Sic.5,23,3). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography L. Gambi, Cosa era la Padusa, 1950  G. Uggeri, La Romanizzazione dell'antico Delta Padano, 1975, 49  Id., Insediamenti, viab…

Paean

(1,081 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Doric, later generally widespread Παιάν/ Paián; epic Παιήων/ Paiḗōn; Ionic-Attic Παιών/ Paiṓn; Aeolian Πάων/ Páōn; Lat. paean). Term for a Greek song genre as well as a god, later an epithet for various gods. The etymology of the word is obscure [1; 2; 3]. Modern treatises on the song genre paean usually make the identity of the name for the song and the god the starting-point of their considerations. Either the god was a personification of the call [4; 5] drawn from the impersonal cry ἰὴ παιάν ( iḕ paián) or there was originally a god Paean to whom the cry ἰὴ Παιάν ( iḕ Paián) was …

Paeania

(198 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Παιανία/ Paianía). Great Attic mesogeia deme of the phyle Pandionis in Liopesi (today again P.), divided into Upper P. (Π. καθύπερθεν/ P. kathýperthen) with one bouleutḗs and Lower P. (Π. ὑπένερθεν/ P. Hypénerthen) with eleven bouleutaí (Harpocr. s.v. Παιανιεῖς). In 307/6 BC, Upper P. changed over to Antigonis. The deme decree IG I3 250 (450/430 BC; FO: Liopesi) [2. 385 No. 83] of Lower P., which mentions a quorum of 100 dēmótai [2. 95], attests to the harvest festival of Pr(o)ērosía [2. 196f.] and hieropoioí ('cult officials') [2. 142, 183]. For the cult of …

Paederasty

(591 words)

Author(s): Hartmann, Elke (Berlin)
(παιδεραστία/ paiderastía). [German version] A. Definition Paederasty was a form of homosexuality practiced in Greece among men of a certain age. A 12 to 18 year old 'youth' (παῖς/ paîs) would be the 'beloved' (ἐρώμενος/ erṓmenos) of a man older than 30, the 'lover' (ἐραστής/ erastḗs), who would also educate him. Modern scholars asses the sexual and pedagogic aspects of paederasty variously; they explain it alternatively as a pedagogically embellished sexual relationship or as an erotically tinged education, focusing on teaching martial competency and the virtue  (ἀρετή/ aretḗ) of …

Paelex

(65 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] From a statement by the Roman jurist, Paul (Dig. 50,16,144) the meaning of paelex (also pelex, pellex, different in Greek pallakḗ ) is that of a female partner to whom one is not married (i.e not uxor, Marriage III.C.). The legal status of paelex was treated in Roman law mainly in the context of concubinage ( concubinatus ). Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)

Paeligni

(344 words)

Author(s): de Vido, Stefania (Venice)
[German version] Italian tribe in the Appennines midway along the river Aternus in the neighbourhood of the Vestini, Marrucini, Marsi [1] and Frentani (Str. 5,2,1; 5,3,4; 5,3,11; Liv. 9,19,4; 26,11,11). They inhabited a cold (Hor. Carm. 3,19,8; Ov. Tr. 4,10,3) and water-rich mountain region (Ov. Am. 2,1,1). Together with the Vestini they had access to the sea by means of the Aternus (Str. 5,4,2); moreover the coast around Hortona and the mouth of the Sarus (Ptol. 3,1,19) were also regarded as Pael…

Paenula

(233 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman cape of different lengths, produced from a semi-circular cut. It was sewn together at the front, had an opening for the head to slip in and a sewn-on hood. If required, the seam at the front could be unpicked from the bottom end in order to give the arms more room to move. The paenula was made of leather, linen or (sheep's) wool and was worn by men and women of all classes, slaves and soldiers, in particular as a travelling and bad-weather coat for protection against the cold and rain; it was white or gray, or dyed in various sh…

Paeones, Paeonia

(200 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Παίονες/ Paíones, Παιονία/ Paionía). Large tribe under its own king, inhabiting the north of the area later known as Macedonia, particularly in the valley of the Axius and the surrounding mountain regions as far as the Strymon (Thuc. 2,98,2; Str. 7,5,1). Hom. Il. 848-50 knew of the P. as friends of the Trojans; in c. 500 BC, the P. around Lake Prasias were temporarily deported to Phrygia by the Persian Megabazus (Hdt. 5,16) [1]. In 359 BC, P. attacked the Macedonians, but they were defeated and subjugated by Philip [4] II (Diod. Sic…

Paeonia

(147 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (παιωνία/ paiōnía, Latin paeonia or glycyside, cf. Isid. Orig. 17,9,48, Paeonia officinalis Rtz.). The red- or white-flowered peony was cultivated not for its beautiful blooms but for its alleged therapeutic effect. According to Dioscorides (3,140 Wellmann = 3,147 Berendes) the plant was called e.g. γλυκυσίδη ( glykysídē), but the root was called paiōnía, perhaps after the god of healing Apollo Paionios (cf. [1. 100]). The root is eaten to promote menstruation and post-natal purification, drunk in wine it is allegedly helpful e.g. …

Paeonidae

(58 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Παιονίδαι/ Paionídai). Attic mesogeia deme of the Leontis phyle on the Parnes, with three bouleutaí. According to Hdt. 5,62, the fortress of Leipsydrium (which has not yet been located), was above P. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography Traill, Attica, 47, 62, 68, table 4  J.S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 55, 63, 130  Whitehead, Index s.v. P.

Paeonius

(269 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(Παιώνιος; Paiṓnios). [German version] [1] Greek sculptor from Mende, 5th cent. BC Sculptor from Mende. The only known surviving original work by P. is a statue of Nike on a triangular pillar in front of the Temple of Zeus in Olympia, which according to its inscription and a statement by Pausanias (5,26,1) was dedicated by the Messenians. Pausanias suggests that the occasion of the dedication was a victory in 455 BC, whereas the inscription points to the victory of Sphacteria (425 BC); on stylistic grounds …

Paerisades

(622 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
(Παιρισάδης/ Pairisádēs, Παρισάδης/ Parisádēs, Βηρισάδης/ Bērisádēs). Royal name of Iranian origin among the Bosporanean Spartocids (Spartocus) and the Thracian Odrysae. [German version] [1] P. I. Ruler of the Regnum Bosporanum Ruler of the  Regnum Bosporanum, son of Leucon [3] I., 'árchōn of the Sindi, of all Maeotae, Thataeans and Dosci' [1. no. 8], husband of Kamasarye. P. ruled from  349/8-344 BC together with his brothers Spartocu II. and Apollonius, dividing the territory of the kingdom between themselves. In 347/6, a trade agreement with Athens was renewed by them (Syll.3 …

Paestan ware

(394 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] PW first developed in around 360 BC when immigrant artists from Sicily founded a new workshop in the southern Italian city of Paestum (Poseidonia), the leading masters of which were the vase painters Asteas and Python. Both are the only vase painters in southern Italy whose signatures are known on vases. The Paestan vase painters favoured bell craters, neck amphorae, hydrias, lebetes gamikoi (nuptial cauldrons depicting mostly wedding but also funeral scenes), lekanides (cosmetic/trinket containers), lekythoi (one-handled flasks for perfumed oil) and jug…

Paestum

(6 words)

see Poseidonia, Paistos, Paestum

Paestum

(1,940 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] The polis of Poseidonia, founded in the late 7th cent. BC by colonists from Sybaris, was transformed into a Roman veterans colony named Paestum ( P.) in 274/3 BC, with profound consequences for its urban profile and the social composition of its populace. Early in the Roman Imperial period, it began to fall increasingly into decline, firstly because of the new north-south major travel routes which now bypassed it, and secondly because the plain to the south of Salerno, already ment…

Paesus

(126 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Παισός; Paisós). Town in the Troas (Hom. Il. 2,822; 5,612), probably founded by the Milesians (Str. 13,1,19). P. was linked with the sea via the river of the same name. The position of P. is presumed to be near Fanar, north-east of modern Çardak [1. 99]. The neighbouring cities were Lampsacus and Parium, which like P. were conquered in 497 BC by Daurises, the son-in-law of Darius [1] I (Hdt. 5,117). In the Delian League, P. paid 1,000 drachmas (ATL 3,26, No. 135). At the time of S…

Paetus

(94 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] [1] Roman cognomen Roman cognomen meaning 'slightly cross-eyed', for instance describing a squint (Cic. Nat. D. 1,80; Hor. Sat. 1,3, 44f. among others). A genetic trait in the families of the Aelii from the 4th cent. BC (Aelius [I 7-11]) and the Autronii in the 1st cent. (Autronius [I 8]); also an epithet for Cicero's friend L. Papirius [I 22] P. More widespread in the Imperial period. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Degrassi, FCIR, 261 2 Kajanto, Cognomina, 239. [German version] [2] P. Clodius [II 15] Thrasea Paetus see P. Clodius [II 15] Thrasea Paetus

Paeum

(99 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] (Παῖον; Paîon). Small town with well-preserved acropolis wall in western Arcadia in the spring- and vegetation-rich dale lying across the Ladon and Erymanthus valleys, modern Paleokastro, 400 m to the east of modern Neon Paos. In the early period P. was an independent polis (Hdt. 6,127), later it belonged to Cleitor and in the time of Pausanias (2nd century AD) it was desolate (8,23,9). Lafond, Yves (Bochum) Bibliography F. Carinci, s.v. Arcadia, EAA 2. Suppl. vol. 1, 1994, 332  M. Jost, Villages de l'Arcadie antique, in: Ktema 11 (1986), 1990, 148f.  Jost, 45  Pritchet…

Pagae

(195 words)

Author(s): Freitag, Klaus (Münster)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Achaeans, Achaea | Education / Culture (Παγαί/ Pagaí, ethnic name Παγαῖος/ Pagaîos; Att. and lit. Πηγαί/ Pēgaí or Πηγαῖος/ Pēgaîos). Port city in Megaris on the Corinthian Gulf, identified with the remains of a fortified harbour settlement near what is today Alepochori. In 461 BC P. was occupied by the Athenians (Thuc. 1,103,4) who undertook marine operations from that location (Thuc. 1,111,2). During the 30-year peace the Athenians were forced to return P. to Megara [2] (Thuc. 1,115; cf. IG I3 1353). The fortunes of P. we…

Paganism

(7,378 words)

Author(s): Mohr, Hubert
Mohr, Hubert A. Concept and Theory (CT) [German version] 1. Concept (CT) Paganism is the modern, scholarly term for the intentional resumption ('reception') and resurgence ('revitalisation', 'reconstruction') of ancient, or ethnic, religious traditions or of their constituent parts (cults, myths, symbols), insofar as these occurred outside of Christianity and Judaism, and opposed the two. The underlying concept of Judeo-Christian polemic, 'heathenism', should be distinguished from the religious-historical …

Paganus

(510 words)

Author(s): Heimgartner, Martin (Halle)
[German version] The Latin adjective paganus (variation paganicus), derived from pagus ('village', 'district') means 'rustic', 'rural', used as a noun 'farmer', 'villager'; it is only rarely used in a figurative sense ('countrified', 'illiterate') (Sidon. Epist. 8,16,3). Beginning in the 1st cent. AD it took on the meaning derived from military jargon of 'not belonging to the troop', 'set apart', 'outsider', 'non-soldier', 'civilian', 'citizen'. This meaning is found in Christian Latin literature only in Tertullian (De pallio 4); in De corona 11 he associates paganus with the …

Pagasae

(531 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Oracles | Education / Culture (Παγασαί/ Pasagaí). City in Thessaly on the northern coast of the bay named after it, modern Neai Pagasai. Tradition maintains that before P. was founded, the site was dedicated to Apollo Pagasaeus, and the wharf and was the place of departure and arrival for the Argonauts. P. was founded in c. 600 BC by the Thessali, who took possession of a 5,3 km wide coastal strip (Str. 9,5,15; Scyl. 64). Dependent on Pherae, P. was the most significant place on the 'Pagasite Gulf' (Παγασιτικὸς κόλπος/ Pagasitikòs …

Pages

(5 words)

see Basilikoi paides

Pagrae

(82 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Πάγραι; Págrai). Port settlement on the Caucasian coast of the Pontos Euxeinos, 180 stadia from Hieros Limen (Arr. Peripl. p. eux. 28; Anon. Peripl. m. Eux. 10r 9; possibly identical with Toricus in Scyl. Peripl. m. Eux. 74), near modern Gelenǧik, 43 km to the southeast of modern Novorossiysk. Probably part of the Regnum Bosporanum. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography V.F. Gajdukevič, Das Bosporanische Reich, 1971, 237f.  D.D. and G.T. Kacharava, Goroda i poseleniya Pričernomor'ya antičnoy epochi, 1991, 207, 280f.

Pagus

(449 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] (Pl. pagi, etymologically related to pangere and pax; 'region with fixed borders'). The Latin pagus refers to the non-urbanized 'district', whose population lived in individual farms and villages ( vici; see vicus ), possibly with one or more oppida ( oppidum ) serving as a refuge; the pagus was the customary form of settlement for many Italian tribes, esp. the Oscan population of the mountainous regions of Central Italy [4] and among the Celts of Upper Italy [2]. The Romans used pagus as the designation for the subdivision of an urban territory. The pagi in the Roman Con…

Pahlawa

(162 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[German version] Indian name of the kings of the so-called Indo-Parthian dynasty, which is primarily known because of its coins. Gondophares, who ended the rule of the Shaka in Arachosia (Arachosia) and ultimately probably also in Gandhara (Gandaritis), is regarded as the founder of the dynasty. The inscriptions from Taḫt-i Bahī from the 26th year of this king established his rule quite precisely as from AD 20 to 46. In keeping with this, the apostle Thomas is said to have met Gondophares on his j…

Paidagogos

(360 words)

Author(s): Christes, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (παιδαγωγός/ paidagōgós, Latin paedagogus). A household slave of low standing (Pl. Alc. 1,122b; Pl. Ly. 223a-b) who was the attendant of a school-aged child, first attested for the year 480 BC (Hdt. 8,75). Images on vases and terracotta depict him as a bald foreigner with a shaggy beard and a stick [1. 28ff.]. He was constantly with the child and protected it from danger. He taught it proper conduct and good manners; some paidagog also supervised the home-work [2. 276, 282; 3. 75]. In Rome in the course of acquiring a Greek education (C. 2.) a slave was chosen to be paidadgo…

Paideia

(724 words)

Author(s): Christes, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (παιδεία; paideía). Disregarding Sparta ( agōgḗ ), paideia, along with paídeusis (παίδευσις), is the main Greek term for the education (Education / Culture and Education) of a child ( paîs, παῖς) and above all of a young person, which is why paideia also means 'childhood', 'youth'. It therefore refers both to the process of raising and educating and to the result, the education, and as such to the asset of the adult that cannot be lost. In Aesch. Sept. 18, paideia is not distinguished from trophḗ ('rearing'), but in general it is understood as something that must …

Paides

(5 words)

see Child, Childhood

Paid labour / wage work

(1,078 words)

Author(s): Andreau, Jean (Paris)
[German version] PL, which is legally to be understood as the leasing of work (Latin locatio operarum), should not be confused with the leasing of a person, e.g. a slave ( locatio rei). The locatio operis faciundi must also be distinguished from the locatio operarum, being a contract for the completion of specific work (construction projects, public works, manufacture or repair of an object by an artist). An inscription from Puteoli (105 BC) gives a good example of such a locatio operis (CIL X 1781 = ILS 5317), the building of a wall on public land in front of the Temple of …

Paidonomoi

(224 words)

Author(s): Christes, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (παιδονόμοι; paidonómoi, lit. 'guardians of boys'). The Greek office of the paidonómos was regarded by Aristotle (Pol. 1300a 4-6) as a specifically aristocratic one. It presupposes a state education. In Sparta (Xen. Lac. 2,2; Plut. Lycurgus 17,2,50d) and on Crete (Ephorus FGrH 70 F 149), the paidonómoi acted as inspectors, supervising the education ( agōgḗ ) of boys between the ages of 7 and 20 [1. 2387; 2. 60-63, 201 n. 8]. Aristotle argues (Pol. 1336a 30-41) that their competence should be extended to pre-school c…

Paidotribes

(206 words)

Author(s): Christes, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (παιδοτρίβης/ paidotríbēs, 'boy-trainer'). Paidotríbai were originally (beginnings hard to date [1. 96]; first in Aristoph. Nub. 973f.; a 'Solonic' law in Aeschin. 1,12) responsible for the sports training of boys in the palaístra (wrestling-school, sports grounds). From the time of Plato onward palaístrai are recorded that are named after their paidotríbai. Employed in gymnasia [1. 247; 2. 2389f.] they may also have trained professional athletes [2. 2390]. On the distinction from teachers of gymnastic exercises ( gymnastḗs) and teachers of athletes ( aleíp…

Paikuli

(83 words)

Author(s): Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin)
[German version] Village in Iraqi Kurdistan with an expanse of ruins around a stepped altar in the form of a tower (now also in ruins). Stone blocks with Parthian and Middle Persian inscriptions and busts with the representation of the Sassanid Šahānšāh Narseh (293-302; Narses [1]) are preserved. The remains were interpreted by E. Herzfeld as a victory monument to Narseh. Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) Bibliography E. Herzfeld, P. Monument and Inscription of the Early History of the Sasanian Empire, vol. 1, 1924.

Painters

(4 words)

see Artists

Painters (female)

(6 words)

see Women painters

Painting

(3,601 words)

Author(s): Hoesch, Nicola (Munich)
(ζωγραφία/ zōgraphía, Latin pictura or ars pingendi). [German version] I. Greek painting The earliest evidence of ancient painting can be found on the high-quality monumental wall frescoes (Wall paintings, Fresco) of the Cretan-Mycenaean civilisation in palaces (Palace) and houses in Crete and Thera [1]. The most recent examples are from the Byzantine period [2]. Hoesch, Nicola (Munich) [German version] A. Sources and history of scholarship Original works are scarcely and poorly preserved, if at all. This is particularly detrimental for the evaluation of and …

Painting

(8 words)

see Paintings on Historical Subjects

Paintings on Historical Subjects

(7,022 words)

Author(s): Scharf, Friedhelm (Kassel RWG)
Scharf, Friedhelm (Kassel RWG) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) History painting (HP) occupies an exceptional position among pictorial genres that was first acknowledged during the Early Renaissance by Leon Battista Alberti in De Pictura (1435) [1]. In his tract that proved so fundamental for art theory, Alberti was referring to 'narrative painting' in its entirety, which could take its themes from such diverse sources as Christian iconography and pagan mythology, literature and history. However, Classical Greek or Roman t…

Paintings on historical subjects

(717 words)

Author(s): Hoesch, Nicola (Munich)
[German version] In Egyptian art, the illustration of historical events constitutes a rare exception; stylized motifs, such as the king slaying enemies, must be understood as timeless and are used as unchanging topoi over the centuries in various pictorial media. The insufficient material remains, art-theoretical texts and literature from ancient Greece relating to the painting of historical subjects do not permit a precise definition of ancient historical painting, in analogy to the modern term f…

Pakistan; Gandhara Art

(3,006 words)

Author(s): Barlovits, Regina
Barlovits, Regina [German version] A. Terminology (CT) Gandhara denotes on the one hand a geographical and on the other a cultural-historical landscape. The region of Gandhara - the boundaries of which are not precisely defined - lies in the north of modern Pakistan, stretching along the Indus northward from Taxila, then along the Kabul River as far as the Khyber Pass, the present-day frontier between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Its heartland is formed by the region around Peshawar, perhaps also the cou…

Palace

(3,814 words)

Author(s): Nielsen, Inge (Hamburg) | Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
[German version] I. Terminology and Definition The modern term ‘palace’ is derived from the Palatine (Mons Palatinus), one of Rome’s seven hills, on which the residences of the Roman emperors were located. Palaces are buildings that a ruler uses as a residence and for representation. Depending on additional functions, they could have other names in Antiquity, relating to their respective use. Nielsen, Inge (Hamburg) II. Ancient Near East [German version] A. Structural History In the Ancient Near East and Egypt, the palace was originally a house with considerably expa…

Palace style

(5 words)

see Pottery

Palacium

(57 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Παλάκιον; Palákion). Scythian fortress in the steppe region of the Crimea (Str. 7,4,7); together with the fortified settlements Chabon and Neapolis it was founded by Scilurus and his sons (Str. 7,4,3). The Scythians used P. as a base against Mithridates [5] V. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography V.F. Gajdukevič, Das Bosporanische Reich, 1971, 309.

Palaemon

(4 words)

see Melicertes

Palaeography, Greek

(870 words)

Author(s): Eleuteri, Paolo (Venice) | Pradel, Marina Molin
[English version] The term palaeography was first used by the Benedictine Bernard de Montfaucon in his work Palaeographia graeca, which appeared in 1708 and opened the way for modern research into the history of Greek writing with its description of modes of operation as well as of methods. Yet Montfaucon initially received little recognition and it was not until approximately a century later that a work by Friedrich Jacob Bast [1] appeared with the actual analysis of Greek writing as its subject. For almost the …

Palaeography, Latin

(1,065 words)

Author(s): Eleuteri, Paolo (Venice) | Marchioli, Nicoletta Giovè
[English version] From its beginnings, palaeography was regarded as an auxiliary discipline - useful and even indispensable for deciphering and dating manuscripts and documents. It was understood this way by Daniel Van Papenbroeck [8. I-LII] and Jean Mabillon [4], whose works, dealing mainly with diplomatics, mark the beginning of scholarly occupation with the history of the Latin writing system [2]. The term palaeography was coined by the Maurist Bernard de Montfaucon [7]. Soon enough, the new di…

Palaeologan Renaissance

(1,038 words)

Author(s): De Faveri, Lorena (Venice)
The P.R. is one of the most significant phases in terms of the cultural history of the Byzantine empire, during which the engagement with classical texts reached its peak. [German version] A. Overview In 1261 the dominion of the Latins (1204-1261) over Constantinople (s. also Byzantium) ended. The emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos (1259-1282) tried to effect an influential political position for the Byzantine empire once more, but his military and financial resources were almost exhausted (one of the reasons for the eventual fal…

Palaephatus

(655 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] (Παλαίφατος/ Palaíphatos, 'the one who tells old stories'). Passed down to us under this pseudonym was the collection Περὶ ἀπίστων/ Perì apístōn ( On Incredible Things) containing 52 short chapters about the same number of myths. The Suda records under P. four people with this name. The first is an epic poet from Athens, author of a cosmogony; the second comes, according to Suda, from Paros or Priene (Πριηνεύς/ Priēneús probably incorrect instead of Παριανεύς/ Parianeús, i.e. 'from Parion': the encyclopaedia therefore fluctuates perhaps between the island…

Palaepolis

(192 words)

Author(s): Pappalardo, Umberto (Naples)
[German version] (Παλαίπολις; Palaípolis). Probably a fort of Cyme [2] (Liv. 8,22,5), possibly the original name of Neapolis [2]. P. is particularly the nickname of Parthenope, the original centre of Naples on the Pizzofalcone. In 327 BC (Liv. 8,22,8), P. was occupied by the Roman consul Q. Publilius Philo who on that account celebrated a triumph a year later (CIL I2 p. 171; Liv. 8,22,8; 23,1-8; 25,10; 26,7). In 1949 a necropolis was excavated in the via Nicotera in Naples whose first phase is characterized by Greek ceramics from the mid-7th cent. BC to the first half of the 6th cent. BC. …

Palaerus

(286 words)

Author(s): Fell, Martin (Münster)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Acarnanians, Acarnania | Grain Trade, Grain Import (Πάλαιρος; Pálairos). City in western Acarnania, to the east of Leucas (Str. 10,2,21) on a mountain spur of the mostly impassable peninsula of Plagia, which at the time P. was at its zenith predominantly belonged to its territory; the name is Illyrian. The citadel in the modern district of Kechropoula (epigraphical identification: [2]) commands the fertile plain of Zaverda (modern P.) to the east and the south. In 431 BC the Corinthian town (πόλισμα/ pólisma) of Sollium and…

Palaeste

(46 words)

Author(s): Strauch, Daniel (Berlin)
[German version] (Παλαίστη/ Palaíst ē). Town in Acroceraunia on the coast of Epirus, modern Palasë in Albania, where Caesar landed his troops during his Dyrrhachium campaign on 4 January 48 BC (Caes. B. Civ. 3,6,3; Luc. 5,460). Strauch, Daniel (Berlin) Bibliography N.G.L. Hammond, Epirus, 1967, 125f.

Palaestina

(1,106 words)

Author(s): Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Pahlitzsch, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] I. Name, geography, early history The Latin name P. originated from Greek Παλαιστίνη ( Palaistínē); the latter originated from Aramaic pelištaīn and Hebrew pelištīm, which was originally used to describe the settlement area of the Philistines in the south of the Near Eastern Mediterranean coast between Gaza and Carmel (likewise Egyptian prst/ pw-r-s-ṯ, 'foreign land of Philistaea', and Palaistínē in Hdt. 1,105; 3,5; 91; 7,89). P. was also mentioned as KUR pa-la-as-tú  in Neo-Assyrian sources since Adad-nirārī III (811-783 BC). The designation P. pa…

Palaic

(335 words)

Author(s): Starke, Frank (Tübingen)
[German version] The language of the country of Plā (cuneiform Pa-la-a-) situated northwest of the Halys in Paphlagonia. It belongs to the Anatolian languages and is passed down from the 16th-15th cent. BC by the Hittites (Ḫattusa II, Hittite). The names of Plā and of neighbouring Tum(m)anna (Ḫattusa II , map), survive in the Greek regional names Blaē̈nḗ and Domanítis. It would therefore seem more accurate if the name of the language, which derives from Hittite Plaumnili- (derivation from the ethnic name Plaumen-*), were 'Plaic'. The extent of the area in which P. was spoken is…

Palaiste

(115 words)

Author(s): Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
[German version] (παλαιστή/ palaist ). Greek unit of length (a 'hand's width', cf. Latin palmus ) of 4 δάκτυλοι ( dáktyloi), corresponding to 1/4 foot. Extrapolating from the length of the underlying measurement, the foot (πούς/ pous ), the palaiste is between 68 and 87 mm long. This unit of measure, the dáktylos ('finger's width'), the σπιθαμή ( spithamḗ /'span') and the πῆχυς ( pêchys /'cubit') draw on the proportions of the human body. According to Herodotus 1 foot corresponds to 4 hands and a cubit to 6 hands (Hdt. 2,149,3). Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim) Bibliography 1 F. Hultsc…

Palaistra

(191 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (παλαίστρα, Latin palaestra). The palaistra developed in the 6th cent. BC as a core element of a gymnasium (with illustration) and, together with a dromos (an elongated running-track) and various long colonnades and covered walkways,  forms a  constitutive part of this type of architecture. A palaistra consists of a roughly square court, surrounded by a peristyle, and various suites of adjacent rooms. Palaistrai were used as places for wrestling; the associated rooms were used for exercising, changing and storing equipment. Greek palaistrai were public spaces,…

Palamedes

(482 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne)
(Παλαμήδης/ Palamḗdēs). [German version] [1] Son of Nauplius and Clymene (Π./ P., or Ταλαμήδης/ Talamḗdēs, Etr. Palmithe or Talmithe). Son of Nauplius [1] and Clymene [5] or Hesione [2], brother of Oeax (Apollod. 2,23; 3,15). The seemingly obvious etymological meaning of the name ('with skilful hands') becomes doubtful considering the Etruscan form talmithe (from Greek pálmys = basileús, 'king'). In Greek, P. is the epitome of the skilful inventor ( prṓtos heuretḗs ) [1] (cf. Pl. Phdr. 261d). He is attributed, for instance, with the invention…

Palantia

(125 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Principal town of the Vaccaei (ILS 6096; Plin. HN 3,26; Mela 2,88; It. Ant. 449; Παλλαντία/ Pallantía: Str. 3,4,13; App. Ill. 231 ( et al.); Ptol. 2,6,50; Orus. 7,40,8), modern Palencia on the Carrión river in Castilla la Vieja. P. was repeatedly besieged in vain by the Romans in the Celtiberian Wars (153-134 BC). After being subjugated, P. was one of the peregrine communities of the conventus Cluniensis (Plin. l.c.). In AD 409 the Vandals, Suebi and West Goths (Goti) advanced across of the territory of P., plundering as they went (Orus. l.c.): The city was destroyed by …

Palas

(93 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Region in which boundary markers separated the territories of the Burgundiones and the Romans, also called Capellatium; hither, Iulianus [11] led a campaign against the Alamanni on the right bank of the Rhine river in AD 359 (Amm. Marc. 18,2,15). P. should probably be localised around Öhringen northeast of Heilbronn. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography P. Goessler s.v. P., RE 18.2, 2516-2528  W. Dahlheim, Capellatium, in: RGA 4, 1980, 338f.  L. Jacob, I. Ulmann, Kommentar zu Ammianus, in: J. Herrmann (ed.), Griechische und lateinische Quellen zur Früh…

Palatini

(386 words)

Author(s): Groß-Albenhausen, Kirsten (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] The term 'palatini' was used since the 4th cent. AD as a designation for those serving in a military or civil capacity at court ( palatium) or in close association with it. Among the palatini of the militia armata were the soldiers of the scholae palatinae and also those of the elite troops first attested in 365, but probably already separated from the comitatenses around 320. We know from the notitia dignitatum of 157 units of palatini, most of whom came under the jurisdiction of the magistri militum praesentales ( magister militum ); however, in the…

Palatium

(6 words)

see Mons Palatinus; Palace

Pale

(77 words)

Author(s): Strauch, Daniel (Berlin)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Persian Wars | Athenian League (Second) (Πάλη/ Pálē). Town west of Cephallenia on the Paliki peninsula north of modern Lixuri. Hdt. 9,28,5 confuses Παλέες/ Palées with αλεῖοι/ Waleíoi, 'citizens of Elis', when mentioning the involvement of the troops of P. in the battle of Plataeae in 479 BC. There are hardly any ancient remains. Inscriptions: IG IX 1, 645f.; Coins: BMC, Gr (Peloponnese) 84-88. Strauch, Daniel (Berlin)

Pales

(428 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva)
[German version] Deity of shepherds and herds. In the pastoral Latin literature (e.g. Verg. Ecl. 5,36; Calp. Ecl. 4,106) and in classical texts on Roman religion (Varro in Gell. NA 13,23,4; Ov. Fast. 4,723ff.) P. is female. However a male P. is documented as well (Varro in Serv. Georg. 3,1). The entry of the 7th July in the late Republican Fasti antiates maiores: Palibus II (InscrIt 13,2 p. 14) and Varro Rust. 2,5,1: Palibus point to the existence of two P.s [1] and could be a further indication of a male P. [2.101f.]. In order to avoid the assumption that two deitie…

Palestinian-Aramaic

(211 words)

Author(s): Voigt, Rainer (Berlin)
[German version] PA (or Syropalestinian) was the literary language of the Christian Melcitian population in Palaestina (hence it is usually referred to as Christian Palestinian Aramaic). Together with Samaritan Aramaic and Jewish Palestinian Aramaic, it belonged to the western dialects of Central Aramaic (from the 3rd cent. AD onwards). There are two periods in the tradition: from the period when this Western Aramaic dialect was still spoken (5th-8th cent. AD), we have literary testimonials (parts…

Palice

(201 words)

Author(s): Messina, Aldo (Triest)
[German version] (Παλική; Palikḗ). City in Sicily, founded by Ducetius in 453 BC near the sanctuary of the Palici as a centre of the kingdom of the Siculi by moving Menainon to the plain (Diod. Sic. 11,88,6). When Diod. Sic. 12,29,2-4 reports on the destruction of the city of Thrinacia in 440 BC by Syracusae, the reference is possibly to P. (cf. Diod. Sic. 11,90,2; [1]). After P. was rebuilt, it was a flourishing city right through to the early Hellenistic period. In the 2nd cent. BC, it was abando…

Palici

(318 words)

Author(s): Lamboley, Jean-Luc (Grenoble)
[German version] (Παλικοί/ Palikoí, Lat. Palici). The P. are twin deities who came from indigenous Sicily and lived in Siculian territory. Their history is nly known to us from literary sources. According to Aeschylus' Aetnaeae , they were sons of Zeus and Thalia, the daughter of Hephaestus. In order to protect herself from Hera's jealousy, Thalia hid in the earth; at birth the children emerged from the earth like resurrected people (their name means 'they who return'). The sanctuary of P. was identified in 1962, close to the lak…

Palilia

(5 words)

see Pales; Parilia

Palimbothra

(199 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Graeco-Bactria | Graeco-Bactria | India, trade with | Mauryas (Παλίμβοθρα/ Palímbothra, also Παλίβοθρα/ Palíbothra; name derived from an early Middle Indian form of Old Indian Pāṭaliputra [1. 34]). City of the Prasii, located in a position favourable for communications in the densely populated state of Magadha at the confluence of the Son and Ganges in modern Patna in Bihar. Made by Sandracottus the capital city of the Maurya empire (Mauryas), often mention…

Palimpsest

(350 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (παλίμψηστος/ palímpsēstos [βίβλος/ bíblos or χάρτης/ chártēs], lat. codex rescriptus). A 're-scraped' book, papyrus or parchment leaf, prepared for renewed writing after its first text was scraped off. The first text was either wiped off with a sponge or scraped away with pumice stone. This method was already used in Egypt (e.g. PBerlin 3024, 12th dynasty, from c. 2000 BC), and was also standard practice in later periods, out of thrift (Cic. Fam. 7,18,2) or lack of virgin papyrus or parchment (cf. Catull. 22,5). Plutarch (Mor. 779c, 50…

Palindikia

(270 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (παλινδικία; palindikía). 'Once more raising a legal action in the same matter', cf. anadikía and the underlying words (ἀνὰ/ anà and πάλιν δικάζειν/ pálin dikázein). The criticism levelled against advocates ( logográphos), to have obtained a palindikía through trickery (Plut. Demosthenes 61; Poll. 8,26), did not always have to take a rupturing of material legal power ( paragraphḗ ) into account, but could also relate to the fact that that a legal claim was prosecuted with a variety of actions, as was permissible in Ath…

Palindrome

(274 words)

Author(s): Gärtner, Hans Armin (Heidelberg)
[German version] In literary theory a palindrome, corresponding to παλίνδρομος ( palíndromos, 'running backwards'), denotes a sequence of letters - a word, sentence or verse ( versus supinus, recurrens; [2. 278f.] on Mart. 2,86,1-2; cf. Sid. Epist. 9,14,4-6) - that can also be read backwards with the same or a different sense, occasionally resulting also in the same or a different verse. A palindrome in the strict sense corresponds to itself mirror-wise from the middle outwards. Thus in Late Antiquity 'crab verse' (καρκίνος/ karkínos or καρκινωτόν/ karkinōtón) was a familiar for…

Palinodia

(113 words)

Author(s): Robbins, Emmet (Toronto)
[German version] (παλινῳδία/ palinōidía). Poem by Stesichorus in which he withdrew the vituperation of Helen [1] because of which he had lost his eyesight (192 PMGF). This 'revocation' is said to have restored his vision. Stesichorus withdrew his report that Helen had travelled to Troy and appears instead to have introduced the story that she had spent the war years in Egypt. There were apparently two palinodies (193 PMGF). Later the term was used for any type of revocation (cf. for instance Cic. Att. 4,5,1). Chiastically arranged songs (a b : b a) are also called 'palinodic' (H…

Palinurus

(175 words)

Author(s): Bove, Annalisa (Pisa)
[German version] (Παλίνουρος; Palínouros). The modern Capo Palinuro on the Tyrrhenian coast of Italy (Str. 6,1,1; Cass. Dio 49,1: Παλίνουρον; Plin. HN 3,71: promunturium Palinurum). Ancient literature mostly associates its name with the helmsman of Aeneas (Aeneas [1]) who was shipwrecked here (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,53,2; Verg. Aen. 6,337ff.; Mela 2,69; Sol. 2,13). The idea that there was a city P. is supported by silver staters with the inscription PAL-MOL that lead us to assume that P. and Molpe were Hellenized Italian settlements in the sphere of influence of Sybaris. Archaeologica…

Palla

(4 words)

see Pallium

Palladas

(329 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] (Παλλαδᾶς; Palladâs). Important exponent of pre-Byzantine epigrammatic poetry and probably the author of a collection of mostly satirical epigrams (cf. Anthology E.); he lived in the 2nd half of the 4th cent. AD in Alexandria (numerous allusions to an Egyptian context in P,. whose name appears on several occasions with the ethnikon Ἀλεξανδρεύς/ Alexandreús). Dating is made possible by Anth. Pal. 11,292 (attack on Themistius, in 384 praefectus urbi of Constantinople); 10,90 (presumably written after the destruction of the Serapeum in 391, cf. 9,37…

Palladion, Palladium

(616 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva)
[German version] (Παλλάδιον/ Palládion, Latin Palladium). A statue that guaranteed the protection of a city [1]. The most famous one is the Palladion of Troy, which already in Antiquity had been connected etymologically to Pallas [3] (Apollod. 3,12,3) and was claimed to have fallen from the sky (Pherecydes FGrH 3 F 179; Dion. Hal. Ant. 2,66,5; Ov. Fast. 6,421f.) and to have been brought by Dardanus [1] to Troy as Athena's gift (Dion. Hal. Ant. 1,68f.) or as a gift from Zeus (Iliupersis PEG I fr. 1). …

Palladius

(1,607 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Gatti, Paolo (Trento) | Touwaide, Alain (Madrid) | Ruffing, Kai (Münster) | Et al.
[German version] I Greek (Παλλάδιος; Palládios). [German version] [I 1] Greek rhetor, 4th cent. Greek rhetor of the first half of the 4th cent. AD (Suda s.v. P. gives his prime as under Constantinus [1] I) from Methone (probably the Messenian one). According to the Suda, in addition to declamations he wrote in all three rhetorical genres ( genera dicendi ) and also an antiquarian work on the festivals of the Romans (FGrH F 837). Whether P. is identical with one of the numerous Palladii mentioned in the letters of Libanius and if …

Pallake

(328 words)

Author(s): Hartmann, Elke (Berlin)
[German version] (παλλακή; pallakḗ). The word pallakḗ (Epic παλλακίς/ pallakís) has the basic meaning  “girl”. In Homer a woman living with an already married man, who has come into the house as a prisoner of war or a slave, is called a pallakís (Hom. Il. 9,449; 9,452; Hom. Od. 14,199ff.; cf. 4,10ff.). By the 5th cent. BC, Herodotus is using the term pallakḗ in the sense of “concubine” (cf. e.g. Hdt. 1,84,3; 1,136,1). In the 5th and 4th cents. BC a pallakḗ was a woman who, without a formal marriage agreement, lived permanently with a married or unmarried man; monogamous …
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