Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Lacus Curtius

(156 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Monument on the Forum Romanum in Rome, which already in antiquity was associated with various myths of Rome's early history ( Curtius [1]). Probably built in the Augustan period, the lacus Curtius (LC) was among the monuments on the Roman Forum that served as vivid, palpable manifestations of early Roman history and, as such, provided a means by which mythology could be given a role to play in the depiction of historical reality, which so far had been recorded primarily in the form of chronicles. The LC consist…

Lacus Fucinus

(190 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Bove, Annalisa (Pisa)
[German version] A lake that often overflows because it has no outlet (155 km2, 655 m above sea level) in the area of the Marsi between Sulmona and the national park of Abruzzo. Caesar contemplated draining it (Suet. Iul. 44), Augustus prevented it (Suet. Claud. 20), Claudius realized it in part by laying a 5.65 km long drainage to the Liris (Suet. Claud. 20f.), under Nero the project was stopped (Plin. HN 36,124). According to CIL IX 3915, renewed flooding in AD 117 made it necessary to reclaim the borderin…

Lacus Larius

(156 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] Modern Lago Lario or Lago di Como. Formed by the Addua, which flows out again from the eastern arm (Plin. HN 2,224; Str. 4,6,12), it bisects the central foothills of the Alps. In antiquity, it stretched further towards the north (Cato fr. 38). The via Regina [1] runs parallel along the western shore from Comum to the Alpine passes (Splügen/Cuneus Aureus, Maloja, Julier) [2. 14]. In the pre-Roman period ( Golasecca culture) [3. 159] it was an important connection from the Po Plain to central Europe, in the Roman period a com…

Lacus Lemanus

(161 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] Largest of the Alpine lakes (581 km2), modern Lake Geneva. Documented by Caes. B Gall. 1,2,3; 8,1; 3,1,1; Str. 4,1,11; 6,6; 11; Luc. 1,396; Mela 2,74; 79; Plin. HN 2,224; 3,33; Ptol. 2,10,2; Amm. Marc. 15,11,16. It. Ant. 348,2: lacus Lausonius; Tab. Peut. 3,2: lacus Losanenses. It was the border between Gallia Belgica or Germania superior and Gallia Narbonensis and thus separated the Helvetii in the north from the Allobroges in the south. In Genava harbour installations have been established through dendrochronological methods for the…

Lacus Lucrinus

(140 words)

Author(s): de Vido, Stefania (Venice)
[German version] Brackish lagoon on the Campi Phlegraei, separated from the sea by a sandbar, on which Hercules is supposed to have built the via Herculanea (Str. 5,4,5f.). The lake was known for its wealth of fish. The later Augustus and Agrippa had the lacus Lucrinus (LL), together with lacus Avernus, converted into the portus Iulius (Plin. HN 36,125; Serv. Aen. 2,161). There were many famous villas on the LL (Cic. Att. 14,16), of which there are no remains due to volcanic eruptions and shifting shorelines (bradyseism); the lake, too, is now largely buried. de Vido, Stefania (Venice) Bibli…

Lacus Nemorensis

(332 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Crater lake in Latium near Aricia in the Alban Hills (Plin. HN 19,141), modern Lago di Nemi. An underground drainage adit (Str. 5,3,13) was cut around the 4th cent. BC [1]. The forested slopes on its banks formed the nemus Dianae (grove of Diana, with temple and high priest, rex Nemorensis, who - always a runaway slave - had to kill his predecessor in single combat [2; 3; 4]). The nemus Dianae led to the lake being called lacus Nemorensis (Prop. 3,22), but also speculum Dianae (‘Mirror of Diana’) (Serv. Aen. 7,516). There was a community of villas (Cic. Att. 6,1,4…

Lacus Pelso

(302 words)

Author(s): Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] (also L. Pelsois, L. Pelsodis). Lake in Pannonia (today 591 km2, 106 m above sea level, average depth 3 m), important as a shipping route with many overland connections, modern Balaton in western Hungary. Pliny (HN 3,146) has Lacus Pelso (LP) border on the territory of the Norici ( Noricum) and the deserta Boiorum ( Boiohaemum), which commonly led to the assumption that Lake Neusiedel was also called LP [1. 26f.; 2; 3. 61]. While the area west of LP is supposed to have been dependent on the Norici in the early 1st cent. AD [4. 15f.]…

Lacus Prelius

(72 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Coastal lake in Etruria (Cic. Mil. 74; Prile, Plin. HN 3,51) between Vetulonia and Rusellae (the remnants of which can still be seen in the Padule di Raspollino), with a station ad lacum Aprilem of the via Aurelia (It. Ant. 229; 500; Tab. Peut. 4,3). It was fed by the Bruna, which emptied into the mare Tyrrhenum at Castiglione della Pescaia (province of Grosseto). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Lacus Regillus

(90 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] Crater lake (now dry) in agro Tusculano (Liv. 2,19ff.) near Frascati; modern Pantano Secco. In 499 or 496 BC, a battle between Romans and Latini took place there (Liv. l.c.; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 6,3,3, with the rumour that the Dioscuri had caused the Roman victory). The foedus Cassianum , which was agreed afterwards, regulated the return of Rome into the Latin League. Bianchetti, Serena (Florence) Bibliography A. Alföldi, Early Rome and the Latins, 1965, 111-116 M. Pallottino, Origini e storia primitiva di Roma, 1993, 322-323.

Lacus Trasumenus

(126 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] Lake between Cortona [1] and Perusia, modern Lago Trasimeno. It was here in 217 BC that Hannibal [4] defeated the Romans under C. Flaminius [1] (Pol. 3,80-85; App. Hann. 38-41; Liv. 22,4,1) in the Second Punic War. The site of the battle is uncertain: between Montigeto and Montecolognola [1], between Borghetto and Montigeto [2. 105-115] or between Borghetto and Tuoro [3. fig. 15]. Bianchetti, Serena (Florence) Bibliography 1 J. Kromayer, Die Schlacht am Trasimenischen See und die Methode der Schlachtfeldforsch., in: Neue Jbb. für das klass. Alt. 25, 1910, 185-200 2 G. D…

Lacus Vadimonis

(86 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] Crater lake in southern Etruria between Orte and Bomarzo, modern Lago di Bassano (Plin. Ep. 8,20; Plin. HN 2,209; Sen. Q Nat. 3,25,8). The Romans under P. Cornelius [I 27] Dolabella defeated Etrusci and Galli there in 283 BC (Pol. 2,19,7-20,6; 310 BC according to Liv. 9,39). Bianchetti, Serena (Florence) Bibliography A. N. Sherwin-White, The Letters of Pliny, 1966, 472-473 M. Torelli, Storia degli Etruschi, 1981, 255 C. Saylor, Overlooking Lake Vadimon: Pliny on Tourism (Epist. 8,20), in: CPh 77, 1982, 139-144.

Lacus Velinus

(231 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] A lake formed by the rivers Avens, Himella and Tolenus in the territory of the Sabini in the plains below Reate. It was partially drained in 272 BC by the consul Curius [4], through the drainage system of the Cascata delle Marmore, which gave the waters of the Avens an artificial outlet. The lake drained into the Nar above Interamna [1]. Q. Axius (Varro, Rust. 2,1,8) and Cicero (Att. 4,15) [1] had villas here. The drainage of Lacus Velinus caused quarrels between Reate and Interamna (Varro, Rust. 3,2,3; Cic. Att. 4,15,5; Cic. Scaur. 12,27; Tac. Ann. 1,79; palus Reatina, Plin. …

Lacus Verban(n)us

(59 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] A lake formed by the Ticinus in the Alpine foothills, modern Lago Verbano or Lago Maggiore (Pol. 34,10,21 = Str. 4,6,12; Plin. HN 2,224; 3,131; 9,69); Verg. G. 2,159 possibly hints at the lacus Verban(n)us. Vicus Sebuinus, later called Angleria (modern Angera), is on the eastern shore. Sartori, Antonio (Milan) Bibliography Nissen, vol. 1, 181.

Lacydes

(230 words)

Author(s): Stanzel, Karl-Heinz (Tübingen)
[German version] (Λακύδης; Lakýdēs) of Cyrene. Academic philosopher of the 3rd cent. BC. Took over the leadership of the Academy from Arcesilaus [5], which he held, according to Diog. Laert. 4,60/61, for 26 years and handed over in his own lifetime to Evander and Telecles. How the information contained in Philod. Academicorum Index 27,1-7 is to be reconciled with this is disputed (details in [1. 831]). L. died most likely in the year 207 BC ([1. 830], differently [2. 50]). He lectured in a garden…

Ladas

(5 words)

see Olympic champions

Lade

(79 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich)
[German version] (Λάδη; Ládē). Island originally off the coast of Miletus, length 3 km, height up to 98 m, today only a hilly ridge about 2 km from the coast because of the alluvial deposits of the Maeander. L. became known through the defeat of the Greeks in the Ionian Rebellion 496 BC: Hdt. 6,7ff.; Thuc. 8,17,3; Arr. Anab. 1,18,4ff.; Str. 14,1,7; Paus. 1,35,6. Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) Meyer, Ernst (Zürich) Bibliography L. Bürchner, s.v. L., RE 12, 381.

Ladon

(581 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Lienau, Cay (Münster) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich) | Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
(Λάδων; Ládōn). [German version] [1] Dragon The dragon referred to in Apoll. Rhod. 4,1396, elsewhere referred to only as a ‘serpent’ ( óphis, drákōn), who guards the apples of the Hesperides (as also mentioned on Probus in Verg. G. 1,244); he has a hundred heads and many voices. Mythographers have him either be descended directly (as a chthonic beast) from Gaia (as is Typhon) or from related monsters (Phorcys and Ceto, the parents of Echidna and grandparents of the Lernean Hydra in Hes. Theog. 333-335; Echidna and…

Laeca

(21 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen, perhaps of Etruscan origin, in the family of the Porcii. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Schulze, 358.

Laecanius

(181 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] C.L. Bassus Senator from Pola, cos. Suff. In 40 AD Senator from Pola in Istria. Praetor urbanus in AD 32; cos. suff. AD 40. L. ran a sizeable pottery production on his property on the Istrian peninsula; his son carried it on [1. 230ff.]. PIR2 L 30. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] C.L. Bassus Consul ord. 64 AD Son of L. [1]. Consul ordinarius AD 64. He died in the reign of Vespasian [1. 230ff.]; his adoptive son was L. [4] (cf. [2. 115f.]). PIR2 L 31. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] C.L. Bassus Caecina Paetus see Caecina [II 6]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) …

Laeceni

(83 words)

Author(s): Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Λαικηνοί/ Laikēnoí, Λαιηνοί/ Laiēnoí, Λεηνοί/ Leēnoí, Ptol. 6,7,22). Tribe who settled to the east of the central Arabian mountain range of Zámēs. Their name is not mentioned in any other ancient source and has to date not been satisfactorily interpreted. Perhaps the L. should be identified with the aṣḥāb al-Aika, the ‘people of the thicket’ or, rather, the ‘people of al-Aika’ mentioned in the Koran (15,78 et passim), a prehistoric people allegedly annihilated by the wrath of God. Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)
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