Brill’s New Pauly

Purchase Access
Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

Laco

(69 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Cognomen of Etruscan origin in the families of the Cornelii (Cornelius [20] and lulii and of P. Graecinius L. A follower of M. Antonius [I 9] mentioned by Cicero in 44 BC (Cic. Phil. 2,106; Cic. Att. 16,11,3) bearing the name probably came from a family of the urban nobility of Anagnia, the Abbutii Lacones (ILS 6258). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Schulze, 81; 153; 316.

Lacobriga

(186 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
There were three towns of this Celtic [1] name. [German version] [1] Town in the north of Palantia In the territory of the Vaccaei, north of Palantia in northern Spain ([2]; Plin. HN 3,26; Ptol. 2,6,49; It. Ant. 395,1; 449,3; 454,1). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) [German version] [2] Lusitanian town near modern Lagos Lusitanian town (Plut. Sertorius 13,7; Ptol. 2,5,5; Mela 3,7). Many remains on the Monte de Figuerola near modern Lagos in the Algarve [3], possibly identical to the diocese Laniobrensis ecclesia, mentioned often in ecclesiastical documents [2. 134; 4; 5; 6]. Barceló, Pedro (Po…

Lacon

(84 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] (Λάκων; Lákōn). Otherwise unknown epigrammatical poet (Sicilian origin has been suspected, cf. Theoc. Eidyllion 5), to whom a single votive poem (Anth. Pal. 6,203) is attributed; it may alternatively be the work of Philippus [32] of Thessalonica, the author of the Garland: eleven iambic trimeters, describing the miraculous healing of an old, limping woman in the hot springs of the river Symaethus on Etna. The woman dedicates her stick to the nymphs. Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) Bibliography GA II 2, 369.

Laconian

(6 words)

see Doric/Northwest Greek; Tsakonian

Laconian vase painting

(487 words)

Author(s): Steinhart, Matthias (Freiburg)
[German version] In Sparta, painted ceramics were produced for export as early as the 7th cent. BC. Initially associated with Cyrene, one of the first places where Laconian vase paintings (LVP) were found, the origin of LVP was secured with the excavation of the Artemis Orthia Sanctuary in Sparta. Dating for LVP, which is considered to have reached its peak c. between 575 and 525 BC, is primarily derived from groups of findings in Tarentum and Tocra [3. 8-9]; the representation of Arcesilaus [2] II, which was probably created during his reign [3. 195; 1…

Laconica

(993 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] A. Name Lakōnikḕ gê (Λακωνικὴ γῆ) or L. chṓra (Λ. χώρα) is the customary appellation in prose literature for the national territory of Sparta, especially in Thucydides, always in Polybius, also Herodotus (1,69; 6,58,1), Xenophon (Hell. 4,7,6; 4,8,8; 6,2,31; 6,5,21), Aristophanes (Vesp. 1162; Pax 245), Strabo (8,2,2; 4,9; 5,4ff.), Pausanias (3,1,1; 21,6; 4,1,1; 16,8; 17,1) and Ptolemy (3,16,9), in Latin Laconica (Plin. HN 2,243; 4,1; 5,32; 6,214; 25,94). Epigraphically, this appellation appears only in one proxeny list from Ceos in the 4th …

Laconicum

(5 words)

see Baths; Thermae

Lacrates

(36 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] Spartan olympic champion; died in 403 BC during a skirmish in Piraeus against resistance fighters who freed Athens from the rule of the ‘Thirty’ ( Triakonta) (Xen. Hell. 2,4,33). Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)

Lacringi

(81 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] A Lugian (Vandalic) tribe (Λάκριγγοι/ Lákringoi, Cass. Dio 71,12,2; Lacringes, SHA Aur. 22,1), who fought against Rome in the Marcomannic Wars in AD 170. The L. were settled as foederati in the north of Dacia, where they defeated the Asdingi. Both tribes later counted as Roman allies (cf. Cass. Dio 71,11,6). In later years the L. intermingled with other members of the Vandalic tribes. Burian, Jan (Prague) Bibliography L. Schmidt, H. Zeiss, Die Westgermanen, 1940, 163, 165, 167, 169.

Lactantius

(1,240 words)

Author(s): Heck, Eberhard (Tübingen) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[1] Christian Theologist and apologist, c. 250-325 [German version] A. Life L. Caelius Firmianus qui et L., Christian Latin writer, born in Africa around 250, probably died in Gaul in 325. Diocletian summoned him to teach rhetoric at Nicomedia in Bithynia where he converted, and after the outbreak of the Great Persecution of Christians in 303 he became an apologist ( Apologists). Around 315, Constantine [1] brought him to Gaul, probably to Trier, to be the teacher of his son Crispus. Heck, Eberhard (Tübingen) [German version] B. Works De opificio dei (‘On the Workmanship of God’; 303…

Lactodurum

(65 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Present-day Towcester, Northamptonshire; It. Ant. 2; 6. Late Iron Age settlement; from the mid 1st cent. AD a Roman army station. The town was protected in the 2nd cent. by the construction of a rampart and ditch; stone fortifications were added in the 3rd cent. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-Names of Roman Britain, 1979, 382f.

Lactora

(183 words)

Author(s): Polfer, Michel (Ettelbrück)
[German version] Suburb of a civitas in Aquitania, modern Lectoure (Département Gers), south of Aginnum (modern Agen). Other name evidence: Lacturatis, Notae Tironianae 87,77; Lactura, It. Ant. 462,5; Lactora, Tab. Peut. 2,2; Lacura, Geogr. Rav. 4,41; in provincia Novempopulana ... civitas Lactoratium, Notitia Galliarum 14; ordo Lactor( atium), CIL XIII 511. Oldest historical evidence is a honorary inscription of AD 105, mentioning a procurat( or) provinciarum Lugduniensis et Aquitanicae item Lactorae (CIL V 875 = ILS 1374). 22 altars testify to a taurobolium

Lactuca

(307 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] [1] Lettuce plant Lettuce (θρίδαξ/ thrídax, also θρύ-, θρόδαξ/ thrý-, thródax, θριδακίνη/ thridakínē, Lactuca sativa L.), the lettuce plant known in several varieties (Theophr. Hist. pl. 7,4,5 et passim), whose cultivation and protection against pests, as well as culinary and medical uses, are described by Theophrastus. Thus, according to Theophr. Hist. pl. 7,6,2, its juice is said to help against dropsy and eye sores. Lettuce has been cultivated in Europe, North Africa and Asia for a long time …

Lacunar

(269 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Passed down in Vitruvius [1. s.v. l.], an architectural technical term, on many occasions there also designated as lacunaria (pl.), for the sunken panels that decorated the ceiling between wooden beams crossing one another ( Roofing), the Greek equivalent being phátnōma, gastḗr, kaláthōsis [2. 45-52 with additional terms for details of the lacunar]. Lacunaria were as a rule three-dimensionally recessed and decorated with paintings or reliefs (mostly ornamental). In the temple or columned building, the place where they were first app…

Lacus

(5 words)

see Wells; Cistern

Lacus Albanus

(76 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Lake in the largest of the volcanic craters of the mons Albanus , where Alba Longa and various villas were located, e.g. those of Pompey and Domitian, as well as the Castra Albana of Septimius Severus. In 398 BC the water level was regulated through a drainage channel (Liv. 5,15; Cic. Div. 1,100). Famous wines grew on the slopes (Plin. HN 14,64; 23,33). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography P. Chiarucci, Albano Laziale, 1988.

Lacus Alsietinus

(96 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Lake in southern Etruria in a small volcanic crater, modern Lago di Martignano. Augustus had an aqueduct built from here, the aqua Augusta Alsietina, which provided water for the naumachia in Rome and the nemus Caesarum (Frontin. Aq. 1,11; 2,71) in Trastevere. At Careiae (modern Santa Maria di Galeria) it reached the Aro, an outlet for the lacus Sabatinus (modern Lago Bracchiano), which added more water; an overflow channel was intended for irrigation. The aqueduct continued south at the foot of the Ianiculum; the water was not potable. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Lacus Avernus

(206 words)

Author(s): de Vido, Stefania (Venice)
[German version] (Greek Ἄορνος, Áornos). Volcanic lake connected to the sea near Baiae ( Campi Phlegraei ), especially deep (Lycoph. 704; Diod. Sic. 4,22; Aristot. Mir. 102), sulphurous vapours (Verg. Aen. 6,242; Lucr. 6,744; Plin. HN 31,21; Serv. Aen. 3,442). The lacus Avernus (LA) owed its reputation above all to its connection with the Underworld. The Cimmerii were alleged to have lived here in deep holes (Str. 5,4,5); here Odysseus (Str. 5,4,5f.) and Aeneas (Verg. Aen. 3,442; 6,126; Ov. Met. 14,101ff.) entered the world of the dead, for which reason the LA was the Ianua Ditis ( Dis Pa…

Lacus Benacus

(84 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Today Lago di Garda. Largest Alpine lake in the area of Verona (Plin. HN 9,75), with a length of 500 stadia (along the eastern shore road; cf. Str. 4,6,12; Plin. HN 2,224; 3,131); the river Mincius flows through it. It was navigable despite severe storms (Verg. G. 2,160). The Benacenses (TIR L 32,33) lived on the western shore. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography TIR L 32,80 A. Mosca, Caratteri della navigazione nell'area benacense in età romana, in: Latomus 50, 1991, 269-284.

Lacus Brigantinus

(178 words)

Author(s): Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] Lake formed by the river Rhenus at the northern foot of the Alps (538.5 km2, greatest depth 252 m), named after the Brigantii ( Brigantium) who lived there, modern Lake Constance. Mentioned by Str. 4,3,3 without a name of its own (cf. also Str. 4,4,9; 7,1,5; 5,1; Mela 3,24; Cass. Dio 54,22,4; first by Plin. HN 9,63: lacus Raetiae Brigantinus). Inhabitants of the region were the Vindelici, Helvetii and Raeti. Mela 3,24 differentiates between the upper lake ( lacus Venetus) and the lower lake ( lacus Acronus). Plin. HN 9,63 mentions a type of fish, mustela, in the lacus Briganti…
▲   Back to top   ▲