Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Laniarium

(6 words)

see Meat, consumption of

Lanice

(73 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Λανίκη/ Laníkē; probably a short form of Ἑλλανίκη, Hellaníkē, Curt. 8,1,21). Sister of Cleitus [6], wet-nurse of Alexander [4], who allegedly plaintively called on her after Cleitus' death (Arr. Anab. 4,9,3f.; Curt. 8,2,8f.). L.'s husband is unknown. Two of her sons fell at Miletus, one - Proteas - became famous as a drinking-companion of Alexander (Ath. 4,129a; Ael. VH 12,26). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve, no. 462, cf. no. 664.

Lanista

(97 words)

Author(s): Onken, Björn (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] The lanista trained gladiators (Suet. Iul. 26,3; Sen. Ben. 6,12,2). Lanistae frequently owned fighters themselves, whom they rented or sold to holders of games; thus they had an important function particularly for the holding of games in the smaller country towns (ILS 5163 l. 9f.; 35; 37; 41; 57; 59). Successful lanistae could realize considerable incomes this way; however, their social status was low (Mart. 11,66), and they were not allowed to hold offices in the municipia (ILS 6085 l. 123). Munus, Munera Onken, Björn (Marburg/Lahn) Bibliography 1 T. Wiedemann, Emper…

Lantern

(5 words)

see Lighting; Lamp

Lanuvium

(218 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Tribus | Latini, Latium Town in Latium in the southern foothills of the Alban hills, 18 miles from Rome on the via Appia, modern Lanuvio. Participated in the foedus Cassianum of 493 BC. Loyal to Rome during the Latin War of 340 ( Latin League), L. received the civitas Romana; municipium (338 BC; Liv. 8,14,2), possibly tribus Maecia. Birth-place of the emperors Antoninus Pius and Commodus. The modern settlement is located on top of the ancient town; only the arx (‘castle’), surrounded by a tuff wall, on the hill of…

Lanx

(191 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A plate or flat Roman bowl of varying size, form (oval, rectangular or multiangular) and function; it was used in kitchen work (e.g. Petron. Sat. 28,8), but more often for the serving of dishes like fish, meat and poultry (Mart. 7,48,3; 11,31,19); drinking-cups were served on it. It also found use in Roman legal relations. It is mentioned further as a torture instrument, and the head of John the Baptist was presented on a lanx. In religious ritual , lanx generally designates the sacrificial vessel (e.g. Verg. G. 2,194; Verg. Aen. 213-214). Materials for the lanx included pr…

Laocoon

(725 words)

Author(s): Maharam, Wolfram-Aslan (Gilching)
(Λαοκόων; Laokóōn, Latin Laocoon). [German version] [1] Trojan Trojan, son of Capys [1]/Antenor, brother to Anchises, priest of Apollo Thymbraeus (Euphorion, CollAlex 43 fr. 70 = Serv. Aen. 2,201) or Poseidon (schol. Lycoph. 347; Tzetz. Posth. 713-714). Father of Ethron and Melanthus (Serv. Aen. 2,211) or Antiphas and Thymbraeus (Hyg. Fab. 135) and husband of Antiope (Serv. Aen. 2,201). The earliest reference to L. is in Arctinus of Miletus (EpGF 62,11). Following the apparent withdrawal of the Greek…

Laocoon group

(858 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] A group of marble statues, found in 1506 in the area of the Baths of Trajan in Rome, highly regarded, widely received and academically controversial since its discovery (Rom, VM). It shows Laocoon and his two sons, entangled in sea snakes and nearing death. Its identity with a marble group praised by Pliny (HN 36,37: omnibus et picturae et statuariae artis praeferendum) of the artists Agesander, Athanodorus and Polydorus from Rhodes in the house of Titus, was recognized immediately. The first phase of reception stands under the influence o…

Laocoon group

(2,908 words)

Author(s): Hinz, Berthold (Kassel RWG)
Hinz, Berthold (Kassel RWG) [German version] A. Discovery and Display (CT) More than almost any other work of art the Laocoon group (LG) has left an indelible mark on the history of art and intellectual history of the European modern age. It was found on 14 January 1506 in Rome, in a buried vaulted chamber at S. Pietro in Vincoli (anonymous letter to G. S. L'Arienti, 31 January 1506 [28. 26 f.]). Seeking further information, Pope Julius II sent to the site of the find his architect, Giuliano da Sangallo, who (accompanied by Michelangel…

Laocoosa

(61 words)

Author(s): Michel, Raphael (Basle)
[German version] (Λαοκόωσα; Laokóōsa). Daughter of Oebalus and wife to her own half-brother Aphareus [1]; mother of Idas, Lynceus (Theoc. 22.206) and Peisos (Apollod. 3.117). According to Apollodorus and Pherecydes (FGrH 3 F 127), her name was Arene (eponym of the homonymous Messenian town: Paus. 2,4,2), according to Peisander (FGrH 16 F 2) she was Polydora. Michel, Raphael (Basle)

Laodamas

(196 words)

Author(s): Michel, Raphael (Basle)
(Λαοδάμας; Laodámas, ‘subjugator of peoples’). [German version] [1] Son of Eteocles Son of Eteocles [1]. In his youth, Creon [1] is his guardian; as soon as L. is of legal age he succeeds his father (Paus. 1,39,2). In the Battle at Glisas, he kills the Epigone Aegialeus [1], son of Adrastus, but is himself killed by Alcmaeon (Apollod. 3,83). According to another version, he withdraws after a defeat, with some of his followers, to the Encheleans in Illyria, where his ancestor Cadmus once ruled (Hdt. 5,61; Paus. 9,5,13), another part conquers Homole in Thessaly (Paus. 9,8,6). Michel, Raphael…

Laodameia

(298 words)

Author(s): Waldner, Katharina (Berlin)
(Λαοδάμεια; Laodámeia). Ep. feminine name (‘Ruler over the People’) of various mythological figures. [German version] [1] Daughter of Bellerophon and a daughter of the Lycian king Iobates Daughter of Bellerophontes and a daughter of the Lycian king Iobates, mother by Zeus of Sarpedon (Hom. Il. 5,196-199; Apollod. 3,1,1; Serv. Aen. 1,100). According to Hom. Il. 5,205 she is killed by the enraged Artemis. Waldner, Katharina (Berlin) [German version] [2] Wife of Protesilaus Daughter of king Acastus of Iolcos, wife of Protesilaus, who goes off immediately after the wed…

Laodice

(2,285 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
(Λαοδίκη; Laodíkē). I. Mythology [German version] [I 1] Daughter of Priamus and Hecuba Daughter of Priamus and Hecabe; her husbands are given as Helicaon (Hom. Il. 3,122-124; 6,252), through whom she was spared enslavement after the fall of Troy (Paus. 10,26,3), or Acamas (Parthenius 16 MythGr), Demophon [2] (Plut. Thes. 34,2) or Telephus (Hyg. Fab. 101). According to Apollodorus (Epit. 5,25), after the fall of Troy she was swallowed up by a cleft in the earth (cf. also Lycoph. 316f.; Tryphiodorus 660f.). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [I 2] Daughter of Agamemnon …

Laodicea

(1,011 words)

Author(s): Gerber, Jörg (Bochum) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Belke, Klaus (Vienna) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
(Λαοδίκεια; Laodíkeia). [German version] [1] Port-town in north-west Syria, modern Latakia This item can be found on the following maps: Syria | Theatre | | Coloniae | Commerce | Hellenistic states | Limes | Pompeius | Education / Culture (Λ. ἐπὶ τῇ θαλάσσῃ; L. epì têi thalássēi). Port in north-west Syria (now Latakia or al-Lāḏiqīya), not far from the Bronze Age Ugarit (Ra's Šamra). Founded by Seleucus I around 300 BC together with its sister towns of Antioch, Apamea and Seleucea (the so-called North Syrian Tetrapolis) and equipped with an…

Laodiceans, letter to the

(9 words)

see New testament apocrypha

Laodocus

(334 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λαόδοκος, Λαοδόκος, Λεώδοκος; Laódokos, Laodókos, Leṓdokos, ‘Who receives the People’). [German version] [1] Son of Apollo and Phthia Son of Apollo and Phthia, offers hospitality to Aetolus, who fled to them in the country of the Curetes; Aetolus slays L. along with his brothers Dorus and Polypoetes and renames the country ‘Aetolia’ (Apollod. 1,57). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Participant in the campaign of the Argonauts Son of Bias [1] and Pero; native of Argos; together with his brothers Talaus and Arius he takes part in the campaign of the…

Laogonus

(30 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Λαόγονος/ Laógonos, ‘who grew out of the people's army’). Descriptive name of two Trojan warriors in the Iliad (Hom. Il. 16,303 and 20,460). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)

Laogoras

(63 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαογόρας; Laogóras). Dryopian king who by holding a banquet in the manner of his people in the grove of Apollo offends against the god. L. supports the Lapith prince Coronus in his attack on the Dorian king Aegimius [1]. The latter calls Hercules for help, who then kills L. and Coronus (Apollod. 2,154f.; Diod. Sic. 4,37,3). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Laographia, Laographos

(156 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (λαογραφία, λαογράφος; laographía, laográphos). From the Ptolemaic period onwards, censuses were conducted in Egypt ( laographíai: the people were ‘written down’). These took place from Augustus onwards on a 7-year cycle, and from Tiberius onwards every 14 years. In the Roman period, laographía also referred to the list compiled in the process of those liable for poll tax and the poll tax itself ( Taxes). Men between the ages of 14 and 60 were subject to it unless they were Roman citizens or citizens of privileged Greek p…

Laoi

(117 words)

Author(s): Gerber, Jörg (Bochum)
[German version] (λαοί/ laoí: plural word for Greek laós ‘folk’, approximate meaning ‘people’). In the Hellenistic monarchies (cf. Hellenistic states), especially in documentary sources (i.e. inscriptions, papyri), term for the indigenous subjects, in particular the rural population under the direct control of the royal administration. In the royal lands in the narrower sense, these were also called laoi basilikoí (‘the king's people’). The term does not refer to any specific social or legally defined class but comprises, from the point of view of the …
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