Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Lakhmids

(166 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] (Arabic Banū Laḫm). Kings of the Arabian tribal confederacy of the Tanūḫ (2nd quarter of 3rd cent. - early 7th cent. AD). The seat of the L. was al-Ḥīra, a caravan centre in south-western Iraq, south of Kerbela. As vassals of the Persian Sassanids, the L. controlled the tribes of the Arabian peninsula, and joined the Sassanids' war against Rome, later against Byzantium and her Syrian allies ( Palmyra, Ghassanids). Some L. were Nestorian Christians ( Nestorianism); through their influence, Ḥīra became a centre …

Lakonikai

(64 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λακωνικαί; lakōnikaí). Men's shoes or boots, similar to the embas ( Shoes). Originally a Lacedaemonian (Spartan) phenomenon (Aristoph. Vesp. 1158-1165), later also worn elsewhere (Aristoph. Eccl. 74; 269; 345; 507, Aristoph. Thesm. 142); the elegant lakonikai were white (Ath. 215c) and red (Poll. 7,88). Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography …

Lamache

(41 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαμάχη; Lamáchē). Lemnian woman who conceives Leucophanes with the Argonaut Euphemus. From Leucophanes is descended Battus [1], who founds the city of Cyrene (schol. Pind. Pyth. 455b; [1]). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) Bibliography …

Lamachus

(165 words)

Lamasba

(156 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Significant Numidian road junction, c. 50 km north-west of Lambaesis, modern Henchir Merouana ( Lamasba, It. Ant. 35,2; 5; 6; Lamasbua, Tab. Peut. 2,5; Lamasba oppidum, Iulius Honorius, Cosmographia A 48). L. was probably a municipium from the time of Caracalla (AD 211-217) (CIL VIII Suppl. 3, 22511; cf. 22467). …

Lamb

(4 words)

see Sheep

Lambaesis

(399 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Africa | | Coloniae | Africa | Legio | Limes | Limes | Rome Camp and town in Numidia on the northern slope of Mons Aurasius (modern Aurès), modern Tazoult-Lambèse (on Lam- place-names of the immediate vicinity and beyond cf. [1. 539]). Documentary evidence: Ptol. 4,3,29 (Λάμβαισα; Lámbaisa); It. Ant. 32,4; 33,2f.; 34,2; 40,6 ( Lambese); Tab. Peut. 3,2 ( Lambese); in inscriptions more frequently Lambaesis than Lambaese. L. was close to the beginning of the road leading through the gorge of Calceus Herculis (to…

Lambafundi

(130 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Settlement in Numidia between Lambaesis and Thamugadi, modern Henchir Touchine (CIL VIII 1, 2438 = Suppl. 2, 17941 [ saltus? La] m[ b] afundensium; Tab. Peut. 3,3: Lambafudi; Geogr. Rav. 39,40: Lambafudin). The following designations of origin may be attributable to the episcopal see of L.: Lampuensis ( plebs) (Concilium Carthaginiense anno 411, 1,133,292), Iamfuensis (Not. episcoporum Numidiae 87a), Lamfuensis (Concilium Carthaginiense anno 525; [2. 647]). In Procop. Aed. 6,7,10, a Numidian town newly fortified by Iustinianus is named as Λαμφουαομβά/ Lamphoua…

Lambagae

(44 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] According to Ptol. 7,1,42, a people of north-western India, in the east of modern Afghanistan; Old Indian Lampāka. Its name is preserved in the modern Lamghan; several fragments of Aramaic inscriptions of king Aśoka were discovered there. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)

Lambdia

(66 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Town in Mauretania Caesariensis, c. 100 km south-south-west of Icosium, modern Médéa. Literary evidence: Ptol. 4,2,27 (Λαβδία; Labdía); CIL VIII Suppl. 3, 22567 ( Lambdienses); Concilia Carthaginiensia anno 411, 1,201,8 ( Lambiensis); Notitia episcoporum Mauretaniae Caesariensis 46a ( Ambiensis). Epigraphical evidence: CIL VIII 2, 9239-9246; 10443. Sparse ruins are preserved. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AAAlg, sheet 14, no. 48 H. Dessau, s.v. L., RE 12, 542.

Lambiridi

(93 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Settlement in Numidia between Lambaesis and Lamasba, modern Kherbet Ouled Arif. Literary evidence: Tab. Peut. 3,1 ( Lambiridi); Iulius Honorius, Cosmographia A 44 ( Lamuiridi oppidum); Concilia Carthaginiensia anno 411, 1,206,32 ( episcopus Lambiriditanus); Not. episcoporum Numidiae 19a ( Iamuiritanus). L. was a municipium in the 3rd cent. AD. Some ruins are preserved - including a grave with a mosaic, opinions vary as to its interpretation [1. 464]. Epigraphical evidence: CIL VIII 1, 4413-4435; Suppl. 2, 18564-18584. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography 1 M. Le …

Lambrus

(74 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] (modern Lambro). Left-bank tributary of the Padus (Po), rises in the mountains at the lacus Larius, forms the lacus Eupilis (Plin. HN 3,131; modern Lago di Pusiano), flows through the Brianza and joins the Padus east of Mediolanum. Name pre-Roman, possibly Mediterranean (* lambrusca, ‘wild grapevine’) or Celtic (* Ambrones). Sources: Plin. HN 16,20; Sid. Apoll. Epist. 1; 5; Tab. Peut. 4,2 (river and station). Sartori, Antonio (Milan) Bibliography Nissen, vol. 2, 180.

Lamenting the dead

(14 words)

see Burial; Nenia; Threnos; Death; Dead, cult of the; Mourning

Lamia

(900 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg)
[German version] [1] Female spirit (Λάμια; Lámia). A female spirit who specialized in attacking children (Duris, FGrH 76 F 17; Diod. Sic. 20,41,3-5; Str. 1,2,8; [1. ch. 5]). In this function, L. was often confused with Gello, Mormo and the Strix. In later sources, L. also seduces and destroys attractive men (Philostr. VA 4,25; cf. Apul. Met. 1,17). Her name is etymologically related to laimós (‘maw’), which is an expression of her all-consuming hunger (cf. Hor. Ars P. 340; Hom. Od. 10,81-117 on Lamus, the king of the cannibalistic Laestrygones; lamía is also a designation for ‘shark’…

Lamian War

(157 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Cologne)
[German version] The Lamian (or ‘Hellenic’) War, named after the polis of Lamia, was waged by the Athenians and Aetolians and their allies against Antipater [1]. Its causes were, specifically, Alexander [4] the Great's decree on the exiles, and generally, the hope that the Macedonian hegemony over Hellas could be undone in the wake of Alexander's death (323 BC). After early successes under the leadership of Leosthenes [2], the land war became bogged down at Lamia, where Antipater was besieged i…

Lamiggiga

(113 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Town in Numidia between Lambaesis and Diana Veteranorum, modern Sériana. L. was probably in the territory of Diana Veteranorum, but around AD 200 it had its own magistri and received an ordo decurionum. Legionaries and veterans of the legio III Augusta lived in the town. In 411, L. was predominantly on the side of the Donatists ( Donatus [1]; Concilia Carthaginiensia anno 411, 1,133,1-13; 187,98-100; 198,55f.). Some ruins - churches, baths and wine-presses - are preserved. L. was consolidated into a fortr…

Lamis

(131 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] (Λάμις; Lámis). From Megara, leader of a party of Megarian colonists who, probably together with settlers from Chalcis [1], went to Sicily around 730 BC. There the Megarians separated fr…

Lamp

(725 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] As containers for flammable oil and wick holders, lamps made of clay are a ubiquitous find from antiquity; less numerous are lamps made of bronze, marble and plaster. The basic shape of the lamp was the stone bowl, which was already used as a lamp early in the Stone Age. Early lamps of clay follow this basic form; they are shaped on a potter's wheel and creased one or several times to accommodate the wick in the spout that is thereby created. These Phoenician lamps (also called ‘P…

Lampadarii

(101 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (from the Greek lampás = torch, light; Greek lychnophóroi). Generally torch-bearer (Suet. Aug. 29,3); in late antiquity, the lampadarii in the Imperial Palace or high departments were collected into scholae (‘units’) and probably given prime responsibility for i…
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