Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Icos

(163 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen)
[German version] (Ἰκός; Ikós). Island, 62 km2 in size, in the northern Sporades, modern Hallonesos (also Chelidromia or Chilidromia); member of the  Delian League with a tribute of 1,500 drachmae, likewise of the  Athenian League. After the conclusion of peace between the Athenians and Philippus II in 338, the island came under Macedonian suzerainty; in Athenian possession from 42 BC to the late Roman Imperial period. After the fall of Constantinople, I. was under Venetian influence; after 1537 under…

Icosium

(141 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Commerce (Ἰκόσιον; Ikósion, Punic ʾj ksm, ‘island of the owls’?). Phoenician or Punic foundation in the later Mauretania Caesariensis, modern Algiers. References: Mela 1,31; Plin. HN 5,20; Ptol. 4,2,6; It. Ant. 15,5; Sol. 25,17 (with incorrect etymology); Amm. Marc. 29,5,16 (with allusion to this etymology); Geogr. Rav. 40,44; 88,12. A roman veterans' colony was founded at I. during the reign of  Juba II (Plin. HN 3,19; 5,20). Under Vespasian, the city became a colonia Latina (CIL VIII Suppl. 3, 20853). A h…

Icovellauna

(152 words)

Author(s): Euskirchen, Marion (Bonn)
[German version] Local Celtic goddess related to water by name and by the place of discovery. Four small plates of bronze or marble as well as remnants of an altar with dedications to Dea I. were uncovered inside (CIL XIII, 1.2, 4296-4298) and outside (CIL XIII, 1.2, 4294f.) of an octagonal well building in Sablon near Metz-Divodurum. The fact that a single marble plate for Dea I. was found in Trier, Altbachtal (CIL XIII, 1.2, 3644) does not refute the merely local significance of the goddess in the region of the  Mediomatrici. Euskirchen, Marion (Bonn) Bibliography W. Binsfeld et al., Kat…

Ictinus

(478 words)

Author(s): Knell, Heiner (Darmstadt)
[German version] (Ἰκτῖνος; Iktînos). Architect of the classical period. His greatest achievement is considered to be the Athenian  Parthenon (Str. 9,395-396; Paus. 8,41,9), erected 447-438 BC, which he designed apparently together with  Callicrates (Plut. Pericles 13,7), whose contribution has been emphasized more strongly recently [1]). With the otherwise unknown Carpon he is reputed to have composed a book about the Parthenon (Vitr. 7 praef. 12). Tradition has repeatedly mentioned I. as the archi…

Ictis

(143 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] British island connected to the mainland at low tide where, according to Diod. Sic. 5,22,2, the inhabitants of Belerion (Land's End in south-west-Britain) sold Tin from their mines - this was the beginning of the tin trade between Britannia and the Mediterranean region. The location of I. is still under debate. Possibilities include St. Michael's Mount in Mounts Bay, Cornwall [1. 176], which is connected to the mainland at low tide, and Mount Batten in the Plymouth Sound, Devon, w…

Ida

(165 words)

Author(s): Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen)
(Ἴδη; Ídē, Lat. Ida). [German version] [1] Nymph of the Ida mountains in the Troad Eponymous nymph of the  Ida mountains [2] in the Troad (Ps.-Plut. 13,3 = GGM 2,652), in Vergil (A. 9,177), mother of  Nisus, and a huntress; image with caption on the coins of Scamandria and Scepsis [1]. Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen) [German version] [2] Nymph of the Cret. Ida Eponymous nymph of the Cretan  Ida [1], daughter of Melisseus/Melissus or of Corybas, mother of the  Daktyloi Idaioi by Dactylus (schol. Apoll. Rhod. 1,1129) or Zeus (Stesimbrotus FGrH 107 F 12). Accor…

Ida

(439 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
(Ἴδη, Ἰδαῖον ὄρος; Ídē, Idaîon hóros). [German version] [1] Highest mountain range in Crete Highest mountain range in Crete, modern Psiloritis, with the peak Timios Stavros (2,456 m). Still heavily forested in antiquity (cf. the name I. = ‘wooded mountains’), predominantly with cypresses (Eur. Hipp. 1253; Theophr. Hist. pl. 3,2,6; 4,1,3; Plin. HN 16,142). Used early on for mining metals (FGrH 239,11; Diod. Sic. 5,64,5) and agriculture (Theophr. De ventis, fr. 5,13 Wimmer; [1]). The cave considered the birthpl…

Idaea

(163 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle) | Zingg, Reto (Basle)
(Ἰδαία; Idaía). [German version] [1] Epithet of Cybele One of many epithets of the mother of gods ( Cybele), named after her cult on the Phrygian  Ida [2] (e.g. Eur. Or. 1453; Str. 10,469). Walde, Christine (Basle) [German version] [2] Nymph of the Ida mountains Nymph of Ida [2] in Phrygia, wife of the river god Scamander, mother of  Teucer, the first king in the Troad, after whom the people of the Teucri are named (Apollod. 3,139; Diod. Sic. 4,75). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [3] Daughter of Dardanus Daughter of Dardanus, great-granddaughter of [2], second wife of  Phineu…

Idaeus

(243 words)

Author(s): Willi, Andreas (Basle) | Nünlist, René (Basle) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
(Ἰδαῖος; Idaîos). [German version] [1] Epithet of Zeus Epithet of  Zeus from the Ida on Crete (Eur. fr. 472 TGF; Inscr. Creticae 1,12,1) or near Troy (Hom. Il. 24,291; Verg. Aen. 7,139; in Celaenae: Plut. Mor. 306e f.) and of  Heracles as Daktylos I. and founder of the Olympic Games (Paus. 5,7,6ff.; 8,31,3; also in Elis and Erythrae: Paus. 6,23,3; 9,27,8). Willi, Andreas (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Chryse and Dardanus Son of Chryse and  Dardanus [1] with whom he emigrates from Arcadia across Samothrace to the  Ida mountains [2], which are said to be named af…

Idaioi Daktyloi

(6 words)

see  Daktyloi Idaioi

Idalium

(245 words)

Author(s): Senff, Reinhard (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Kypros (Ἰδάλιον; Idálion). Mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions of 672 BC, a Graeco-Phoenician city in the interior of Cyprus, known to ancient literature as a principal seat of the cult of Aphrodite (Theocr. 15,100; Verg. Aen. 1,681; 692). Inhabited since the late Bronze Age. Ruins close to modern Dhali, between Larnaka and Nicosia, with two acropoleis, a city wall, house remains and necropoleis [1]. In the sanctuaries of Anat-Athena, Rešef-Apollo…

Idas

(362 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Ἴδας; Ídas). Son of  Aphareus [1], king of Messene, and brother of  Lynceus. The Messenian pair of brothers is juxtaposed with the Spartan pair of brothers of the  Dioscuri as Apharetidai, reflecting the rivalries and disputes between Sparta and Messene. I. is characterized throughout as superhumanly strong (since Hom. Il. 9, 556) and quarrelsome, and is also regarded as son of Poseidon (Apollod. 3,117). While courting  Marpessa, the daughter of the river god Evenus at the same ti…

Ideas, theory of

(754 words)

Author(s): Szlezák, Thomas A. (Tübingen)
[German version] The modern (19th cent.) term for part of  Plato's ontology. Whenever there are many perceptible things of the same kind, there is an imperceptible ‘model’, conceivable only in thought, that explains the nature of the ‘copies’ and accounts for their existence. Plato calls this model the ‘idea’ (ἰδέα/ idéa, synonymous with εἶδος/ eîdos). The idea does not come into being and is eternal, immutable, uniform and indivisible, outside space and time; it is what it is, without qualification and ambiguity. (Pl. Symp. 211a; Pl. Phd. 247c et passim). It is at once that which i…

Idicra

(71 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Place in Numidia south of Milev-Cuicul line, the modern Azziz-ben-Tellis (It. Ant. 28,4). Two inscriptions tell of a tariff of sacrifices for the cult of African gods (CIL VIII 1, 8246f.); further inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 8243-8266. In the 4th and 5th cents. I. was an episcopal see (Optatus 2,18, p. 53,4; 19, p. 54,14; Notitia episcopatuum Numidiae 16a). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AAAlg, sheet 17, no. 214.

Idios Logos

(381 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] (Ἴδιος λόγος; Ídios lógos). The idios logos (IL) was set up under  Ptolemaeus VI as a ‘special account’ (first documented 5.1.162 BC, [1]). Almost all revenues from the sale of state property, especially abandoned or confiscated estates (ἀδέσποτα, γῆ ἐν ὑπολόγῳ / adéspota, gê en hypológōi) were paid into this account; by the 1st cent. BC at the latest there was an office πρὸς τῷ ἰδίῳ λόγῳ ( pròs tôi idíōi lógōi) responsible for the administration of the land confiscated in favour of the IL and for reselling it (account management and administration h…

Idiotes

(81 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle)
[German version] (ἰδιώτης; idiṓtēs). The term idiotes designated a private individual who did not hold any office and did not participate in political life; in the military field idiotes was a term commonly used by historians for the simple soldier as compared to those holding command (Xen. An. 1,3,11; 3,2,32; Pol. 5,60,3; Diod. Sic. 19,4,3). In the list of men from the Ptolemaic Egyptian army the simple soldier is designated as idiotes (e.g. P Hib. 1,30,21). Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle)

Idistaviso

(99 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Site of a battle between Teutons under  Arminius and Romans under  Germanicus. The latter had led his troops over the sea to the river Ems and further on land via the river Weser in the summer of AD 16. The Romans won the battle in the I. plain ( campus) between the Weser and hilly terrain (Tac. Ann. 2,16,1) I. cannot be localized but is generally assumed to be in the surroundings of Porta Westfalica. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography B. Rappaport, s.v. I., RE 9, 903-905 E. Koestermann, Die Feldzüge des Germanicus, in: Historia 6, 1957, 429-479, esp. 425-455.

Idmon

(234 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier)
(Ἴδμων; Ídmōn). [German version] [1] Seer Son of  Asteria [2] (daughter of the Thessalian  Lapith Coronus) and of Apollo (Val. Fl. 1,228ff.), father of  Thestor, grandfather of  Calchas (Pherecydes, FGrH 3 F 108.). The Argive  Abas [1] is named as his human ‘father’ (Apoll. Rhod. 1,139ff.; Orph. A. 187ff.; Hyg. Fab. 14,11). As a seer with a telling name (‘the one who knows’), what is apparently the original version of the myth of  Argonauts he takes part in the expedition despite his foreknowledge tha…

Idols

(5 words)

see  Cult image

Idomenae

(85 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Ἰδομεναί/ Idomenaí, Lat. Idomene, Eidomene). Town in the Amphaxitis region of Macedonia, on the road from Thessalonica to the Danube (Str. 8,8,5; Tab. Peut. 8,1), perhaps near the modern Marvinci. I. is already documented in the 5th cent. BC (Thuc. 2,100,3); in the 3rd cent. BC, it was visited by Delphic theōroí (‘sacred envoys’) [1] and was still known in the 6th cent. AD (Hierocles, Synekdemos 639,5). Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn) Bibliography 1 BCH 45, 1921, 17 Z. 68. F. Papazoglou, Les villes de Macédoine, 1988, 177.
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