Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Iccus

(5 words)

see  Olympic champions

Iceland

(1,210 words)

Author(s): Kreutzer, Gert (Cologne)
[English version] Only after its relatively late Christianization in 1000, and the founding of bishoprics (Skálholt in 1056, Hólar in 1106) and monasteries (Þingeyrar in 1112, Munkaþverá in 1155, etc.) [7] did Iceland seek and obtain access to the ancient-Christian tradition of education, with its Latin-speaking written culture as transmitted by Church and scholarship [8; 13]. Thus the first original works (primarily historiographical and hagiographical in content) were composed in Latin; however,…

Icelus

(143 words)

Author(s): ,
[1] Brother of Morpheus see Morpheus [2] Freedman of Galba [2] Full name (Ser. Sulpicius) I. Marcianus. Freedman of Galba [2], who had remained behind in Rome during Galba's governorship in Tarraconensis. Imprisoned by Nero following Galba's acclamation; freed after Nero's death, he rushed to Spain in only seven days to bring Galba the news. He received the gold ring of the equestrian order from Galba and probably the restitutio natalium. He exerted great influence on Galba, allegedly was able to dominate him - although this opinion is more likely to be a reflecti…

Icelus I (gk.)

(6 words)

see  Morpheus

Icelus II (rom.)

(122 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Full name (Ser. Sulpicius) I. Marcianus. Freedman of  Galba [2], who had remained behind in Rome during Galba's governorship in Tarraconensis. Imprisoned by Nero following Galba's acclamation; freed after Nero's death, he rushed to Spain in only seven days to bring Galba the news. He received the gold ring of the equestrian order from Galba and probably the restitutio natalium. He exerted great influence on Galba, allegedly was able to dominate him - although this opinion is more likely to be a reflection of social prejudice in the source…

Iceni

(184 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Celtic tribe in the area of Norfolk and Suffolk (south-eastern England). First mentioned under the name Cenimagni as one of the tribes that submitted to Caesar in AD 54 (Caes. B Gall. 5,21,1). At the time of the conquest of Britain by Claudius (AD 43), they were prepared to accept the alliance with Rome. In AD 47 they rebelled and were subjugated, however, they retained the status of a client kingdom (Tac. Ann. 12,31). After the death of their King Prasutagus c. AD 59, their entire territory was incorporated into the Roman administration, not only the half tha…

Ichana

(117 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] (Ἴχανα; Íchana). Settlement on Sicily, fell under the rule of Syracusae (Steph. Byz. s.v. I.). Evidence: handle of a bronze kerykeion, with the inscription Ιχανινοδαμοσιον; silver hēmílitron (obverse horned head, personification of a river, to its right on some impressions ΣΙΧΑ, on the reverse the bow of a ship with the legend ΝΙΚΑ, datable to the end of the 5th cent. BC; I., therefore, celebrated a naval victory); in a Siculan inscription from Herbessus is ΘΙΚΑΝΑ. Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata) Bibliography G. Manganaro, in: JNG 33, 1984, 31-33 Id., Al…

Ichara

(122 words)

Author(s): Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰχάρα; Ichára, modern Failaka). Island in the Persian Gulf, on the east coast of Arabia. The island, mentioned in Ptolemy (6,7,47 N), is today generally regarded as a variant of  Icarus. While the identification fluctuated between Failaka, Kharg and Qaru for a long time, the equation of Icarus (and thus Ichara?) with Failaka has meanwhile been confirmed by inscriptions. According to Arrian (Anab. 7,20,2-3), the island received its name from Alexander, after an island in the Aegean…

Ichnae

(112 words)

Author(s): Kessler, Karlheinz (Emskirchen)
[German version] (Ἴχναι; Ichnai). Fortified settlement on the Balissus (Balīḫ̣); according to  Isidorus of Charax, situated between Alagma and  Nicephorium (Isidorus of Charax 1 Schoff; Plut. Crassus 25,17; Cass. Dio 40,12,2). Supposedly a Macedonian foundation; despite a similarity to Greek place names, the name may be identical with the old Babylonian Aḫūnā [1. 6].  Licinius Crassus won a skirmish near I. in 54 BC against the Parthian satrap Silaces. Publius, the son of Crassus, was advised to fl…

Ichneumon

(275 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] Egyptian mongoose ( Herpestes ichneumon, first mentioned under the name ἰχνεύμων by Aristot. Hist. an. 6,35,580a 25, but also ἰχνευτής/-ήρ; ichneutḗs/-ḗr), viverrid with dog-like feeding habits, in Egypt and, according to Vitr. De arch. 8,2,7, also in Morocco. The ichneumon stays mostly in the reeds and likes to raid poultry farms. In Egypt, it was known as the ferocious enemy of the crocodile, into whose open jaws it was said to creep and kill by consumption of its entrails (Str. 17,812; Diod. Sic. …

Ichor

(165 words)

Author(s): Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[German version] (ἰχώρ; ichṓr). The word has been connected to the Aramaic or Hebrew root meaning ‘dignity’, ‘splendour’, with possible etymological overlap of the Sumerian root meaning ‘blood’ and the Akkadian root meaning ‘to pour’. In Homer (Il. 5,340; cf. 416), the word denotes the lifeblood of the gods as opposed to regular blood that is produced by eating bread and drinking wine. Ichor also appears in Aeschylus (Ag. 1479f., 458 BC), where the word denotes a fluid which is discharged from wounds that will not close. In the 4th cent., it is more common …

Ichthyas

(71 words)

Author(s): Döring, Klaus (Bamberg)
[German version] (Ἰχθύας; Ichthýas). Pupil of Euclides [2] of Megara, 4th cent. BC, member of the  Megarian School; eponymous character in a dialogue of  Diogenes [14] of Sinope. I. is usually identified with the man called in the MSS Icthydias or Ychtyas, who lost his life in an uprising against his home town (Megara?) (Tert. Apol. 46,16). Döring, Klaus (Bamberg) Bibliography 1 K. Döring, Die Megariker, 1972, 15, 91-94, 100-101 2 SSR II H.

Ichthyes (Pisces)

(5 words)

see  Constellations

Ichthyocentaur

(4 words)

see  Triton

Ichthyophagi

(131 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἰχθυοφάγοι/ Ichthyophágoi, ‘fish-eaters’). Collective ethnographic term for coastal peoples who primarily live on fish. As a Utopian people residing at the ends of the then-known world, the I. are described as models of justice, but sometimes also as animal-like, living on a low civilizational level (Agatharchides of Cnidus, De Mari Erythro, fr. 31-49 = GGM 1, 129-141). Most frequently mentioned are the Ethiopian I. on the Red Sea, whom Herodotus reports as having been sent (in va…

Ichthys

(568 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Lienau, Cay (Münster)
[German version] [1] Fish Fish (Greek ἰχθῦς/ ichthŷs; Latin piscis) was a common food in Greece and Rome, certain fishes in Rome were even considered a luxury food. This explains the Greek curiosity about neighbouring cultures such as Egypt or Syria, where conspicuous food prohibitions were observed and generalized (priests in Egypt: Hdt. 2,37; Plut. De Is. et Os. 7, 353b; Plut. Symp. 8,8,2; Syria: Ov. Fast. 2,473f.; Porph. De abstinentia 2,61 etc.) that probably relate to the worship of fish in these cu…

Icilius

(363 words)

Author(s): Müller, Christian (Bochum)
Name of a plebeian family, that probably already died out in the 4th cent. BC, according to the tradition known for its anti-patrician stance (Liv. 4,54,4). [German version] [1] I., L. People's tribune 456, 455 and 449 BC People's tribune in 456, 455, 449 BC (MRR 1,42; 48). In 456 he is said to have carried through the lex de Aventino publicando, which allocated the Aventine to the plebs (Liv. 3,31,1; 32,7; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 10,31,2-32,5); as the fiancé of  Verginia he bravely resisted the despotism of the decemvir Appius Claudius [I 5] (Liv. 3,44,3; 45,4-46,…

Iconium

(264 words)

Author(s): Belke, Klaus (Vienna)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Sassanids | Byzantium | Christianity | Xenophon | Zenobia | | Coloniae | Commerce | Ḫattusa | Asia Minor | Asia Minor | Rome (Ἰκόνιον; Ikónion, modern Konya). The most important city in Lycaonia developed out of a prehistoric settlement inhabited by the Phrygians (8th cent. BC); only in Xen. An. 1,2,19 is it mentioned as easternmost city of Phrygia, at the crossroads of major trading and military routes. In 25 BC, I. became part of the new province of Galatia along wit…

Iconoclasm

(10 words)

see  Constantinus [7] V.;  Leon III;  Syrian dynasty

Icorigium

(159 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt Roman road-station (It. Ant. 373,1: Egorigio; Tab. Peut. 3,1) where the Trier - Cologne road crossed the Kyll, modern Jünkerath. From the 1st cent. AD long-houses were built close to each other on both sides of the road, with the narrow side facing the street. Destroyed during the German invasions of the 3rd cent., protected in the late Constantinian period by a circular fortification (135 m diameter) with 13 round towers and two gateh…
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