Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Ianitor

(7 words)

see  Wedding customs and rituals

Iannes and Iambres

(104 words)

Author(s): Domhardt, Yvonne (Zürich)
[German version] (Iamnes and Mambres). The pseudepigraphic names of Iannes and Iambres are based on Ex 7,8ff. and was widely received: the two unnamed Egyptian magicians who appear in Exodus as opponents of  Moses and Aaron, are referred to as Iannes and Iambres (the spelling varies depending on whether the source is Greek, Latin or Hebrew) in Jewish, Greek and Roman texts, the NT and other Christian documents. The Iannes and Iambres material was also treated in Rabbinic and Targumic (Targum Ps.-Jonathan) literature. Domhardt, Yvonne (Zürich) Bibliography A. Pietersma (ed.), The A…

Ianthe

(31 words)

Author(s): Schulte-Altedorneburg, Jörg (Marburg)
[German version] (Ἰάνθη; Iánthē, ‘violet blossom’). Daughter of  Oceanus and  Tethys (Hes. Theog. 349; Hyg. Fab. praef. 6; Paus. 4,30,4); playmate of  Persephone (H. Hom. 2,418). Schulte-Altedorneburg, Jörg (Marburg)

Ianuarius Nepotianus

(134 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] Revisor of the collection of exempla by  Valerius Maximus for rhetoric instruction, probably from the 4th cent. AD (based on linguistic arguments [1]). While the original organization was maintained, there were stylistic revisions and additions - partially from Cicero (cf. 7,3; 9,24 etc.). A more complete copy of the excerpt, which has survived in the Codex unicus ( Vaticanus Latinus 1321, s. XIV) only up to Val. Max. 3,2,7, was used still by Landolfus Sagax ( c.1000). Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance) Bibliography 1 F. Buecheler, Kleine Schriften 3, 1930, 331-335 (11906…

Ianus

(1,407 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
The Roman god of passage in a topographical, temporal and figurative sense. His name is derived from ianua (‘passage, gate’) and is connected with  Ianiculum. The name refers to the god as well as to the cultically relevant gates connected to him. Iconographical representations begin in the Republican period, depicting I. usually with two faces, occasionally with four ( bifrons, quadrifrons). [German version] A. Cult centres His cult is almost exclusively public and political, only two private dedications to him are extant. Two old altars of I. in Rome are att…

Iao

(4 words)

see  Yahweh

Iapetus

(185 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἰαπετός; Iapetós). The etymology is uncertain, perhaps ‘the one hurled down’ (on ἰάπτειν; iáptein, ‘to hurl’ [1]). The often postulated connection to OT Japheth, the third son of Noah (Gen. 5,32 et passim), cannot be proven [2; 3]. I. is the titan who was hurled by Zeus into Tartarus along with  Kronos (Hom. Il. 8,479). Son of  Gaia and  Uranus (Hes. Theog. 134). He fathered the sons  Atlas [2],  Menoetius,  Prometheus and Epimetheus with the Oceanid Clymene (Hes. Theog. 507-511). Among others, Asia (Apollod. 1…

Iapis

(69 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] Son of  Iasus and favourite of Apollo. The god wants to grant him the gift of prophecy, of playing the lyre and of accurate archery, but I. asks him for the art of healing instead so that he can save his father's life. With the help of Venus, he heals Aeneas' wounds (Verg. Aen. 12,391ff.; Serv. Aen. 12,391 (Iapyx); Macrob. Sat. 5,15,12). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Iapodes

(322 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] Indo-European people attested since the 9th/8th cents. BC, often erroneously classified as Illyrians, settled in Lika, the Karst plains of Gacko, Ličko, Krbavsko (western Croatia), on the Una near Bihać (western Bosnia) and Notranjska (Inner Carniolia/Slovenia). Administratively, they were part of the conventus Scardonitanus of the province of  Illyricum, later Dalmatia. The Zrmanja and Velebit mountains separated them from the  Liburni in the south. These they fought in the 3rd cent. BC with temporary success for access …

Iapyges, Iapygia

(735 words)

Author(s): Lombardo, Mario (Lecce)
[German version] People and region in the extreme south-east of Italy (modern Puglia). First mentioned by Hecataeus (FGrH 1 F 86f.) together with the unidentified settlements of Eleútioi (Ἐλεύτιοι), Peukaíoi (Πευκαῖοι, possibly equivalent to Πευκέτιοι; Peukétioi) and the pólis Chandánē (πόλις Χανδάνη). Hecataeus (loc. cit.) may also mean the I. with ‘town in Italia’ (πόλις ἐν τῆι Ἰταλίαι; pólis en tēi Italíai). According to Hdt. 4,99 the peninsula south of the isthmus between Tarentum and Brundisium was the acroterium of I. [7. 170-172]. Antiochus (FGrH 5…

Iasdius

(112 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] L.I. Aemilianus Honoratianus Postumus Son of Frater Arvalis, 2nd cent. AD Son of I. [2]. Frater Arvalis AD 240-241. CIL VI 41225. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography Scheid, Collège 464ff. [German version] [2] L.? I. Domitianus Senator, homo novus, praetor, several magistr. Entered the Senate as homo novus. After being a praetor he commanded two legions, became curator viae Aemiliae and simultaneously praefectus alimentorum. Was praetorian governor and suffect consul between about AD 215 and 225. Subsequently, consular legate of Germania i…

Iasion

(483 words)

Author(s): Baudy, Gerhard (Constance)
[German version] (Ἰασίων; Iasíōn, also Ἰάσιος; Iásios and Ἴασος; Íasos). An adolescent hero from the realm of agricultural mysteries. According to a tradition from Crete, I. fathers  Plutus (personification of a wealth of grain) with  Demeter on a thrice ploughed fallow field; for this, Zeus kills him with lightning (Hom. Od. 5,125-128; Hes. Theog. 969-974; cf. schol. Theoc. 3,49-51d; Ov. Am. 3,10,25ff.). The myth explains the emergence of agriculture after the flood (schol. Hom. Od. 5,125). Older resear…

Iaso

(4 words)

see  Hygieia

Iason

(2,023 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier) | Cobet, Justus (Essen) | Wandrey, Irina (Berlin) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Ἰάσων; lásōn). [German version] [1] Leader of the Argonauts Thessalian hero from  Iolcus, leader of the  Argonauts, participant in the Calydonian Hunt (Apollod. 1,68), son of  Aeson [1] and Polymela (Hes. Cat. 38-40; Apollod. 1,107) or  Alcimede (Pherecydes 3 F 104 FGrH; Apoll. Rhod. 1,47); brother of  Promachus (Apollod. 1,143); with  Hypsipyle, he fathered  Euneus [1] (Hom. Il. 7,468) and Nebrophonos (Apollod. 1,115), and with  Medea, he fathered Medeus (Hes. Theog. 1001),  Mermerus [3] and Pheres (Apollod. 1,146). Having been raised by  Chiron (Hes. Cat. 40), I. lives…

Iasus

(1,066 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle) | Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
(Ἴασος/Ἰάσιος; Íasos/Iásios). [German version] [1] Several kings of Argus Kings of Argus: a) son of Argus and Evadne, father of Agenor (Apollod. 2,3), b) son of Argus and Ismene, father of  Io (ibid. 2,5), c) son of Triopas, bother of Agenor, father of Io (Paus. 2,16,1). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [2] Father of Atalante Arcadian, son of Lycurgus and Cleophile, brother of Ancaeus, Epochus, and Amphidamas, husband of Minyas' daughter Clymene, father of  Atalante (Hes. Theog. 1288; Callim. H. 3,216; Apollod. 3,105; 109). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [3] Leader of the …

Iathrippa see Yatrib

(6 words)

see  Yaṭrīb

Iatraleiptes

(106 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Masseur, a profession that seems to have become fashionable in the 1st cent. AD (e.g. CIL 6,9476) but the linking of medicine and gymnastics extends as far back as Herodicus [1] of Selymbria (5th cent. BC). Trimalchio was treated by three aliptae (Petron. Sat. 28). Pliny considers this entire branch of medicine a form of quackery (HN 29,4-5). Vespasian however guaranteed all who practiced this art various privileges (FIRA 1,77) and Pliny the Younger managed to persuade Trajan to confer Roman (and Alexandrian) citizenship to his Egyptian iatraleiptes Harpocrates, w…

Iatrocles

(282 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Engels, Johannes (Cologne) | Binder, Gerhard (Bochum)
(Ἰατροκλῆς; Iatroklês). [German version] [1] Athenian, oligarch, 4th cent. BC Athenian, fled in 411 BC after the pro-democratic uprising of the Athenian fleet off Samos with the trierarch  Eratosthenes [1] and others, when the fleet was operating in the Hellespont, to Athens, where he supported the oligarchy (Lys. 12,42). Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) Bibliography Traill, PAA 531050. [German version] [2] Son of Pasiphon, approx. 350 BC Son of Pasiphon, in 348 BC captured by  Philippus II during the conquest of  Olynthus but then released (Aeschin. Leg. 15-16…

Iatromaia

(95 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (‘birth-helper’, ‘midwife’). Midwifery was usually practiced by women but was not exclusively in their hands. A Parian inscription, for example, records two male birth-helpers (IG 12,5,199) and the preserved treatises on midwifery address a male readership. Iatromaia as an occupational name appears in two Roman inscriptions of the 3rd and 4th cents. AD (CIL 6,9477f.); in one, a Valeria Verecunda is named as the ‘first iatromaia in her region’, an epithet that seems to refer to the quality of her work rather than a position in a collegium.  Midwife Nutton, Vivian (Lon…

Iatromathematics

(982 words)

Author(s): Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[German version] A. Definition Iatromathēmatiká (Herm. 1,387,1 Ideler) or nosoúntōn perignostiká ek tês mathēmatikês epistḗmēs (ibid. 1,430,2-3) etc. is the term for the medical implications of astrology, i.e. the recognition of a nosological predisposition of patients or a prognosis of current illnesses, connected with prevention or therapy, depending on the case. Touwaide, Alain (Madrid) [German version] B. Sources The books on which iatromathematics is based are the alleged revelations of  Hermes, who was possibly assisted by Asclepius. These revela…
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