Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Iabadiou

(61 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] (Ἰαβαδίου; Iabadíou; Old Indic Yavadvīpa, modern Java or Sumatra). Large island in south-east Asia (Ptol. 7,2,29). The identification is still disputed but Ptolemy knew that the name meant ‘Island of Barley’ (Old Indic, yava, barley). Supposedly it was rich in gold and its capital was called Argyre. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography A. Herrmann, s.v. I. nesos, RE 9, 1175-77.

Iacchus

(322 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Ἴακχος; Íakchos). One of the deities of the Mysteries of  Eleusis [1]. I. is the personification of the ecstatic cultic cry ( íakchos, onomatopoetic) by the participants in the Mysteries during their procession from Athens to the Eleusinian sanctuary where they underwent initiation into the mysteries (Hdt. 8,65; Aristoph. Ran. 316-353). His image, which was kept in a temple of Demeter, Kore and I. by the Pompeion at the Sacred Gate (Paus. 1,2,4, probably identical with the Iaccheion Plut. Aristides 27,4), was carried ahead of this procession by the iakchagōgós (‘lead…

Iacobus Psychrestus

(108 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Physician, the son of Hesychius of Damascus, changed his residence in the early 6th cent. AD in order to join his father's medical practice in Constantinople. He treated emperor Leo, whereupon he became a   comes and   archiatros (Chron. pasch. 8254a; Malalas, Chronographia 370 Dindorf; Photius, Bibliotheca 344A). As a pagan philosopher who was honoured in Athens and Constantinople with statues, he ordered the rich to help the poor. The latter he incidentally treated without charging a fee. His nic…

Iactus

(175 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] The technical term in Roman law for ‘jettison’, the unloading of goods at sea from a ship in distress. The so-called lex Rhodia de iactu held that in these cases a community of endangerment of all involved existed: between the damaged party, the mariner ( nauta) and the owners of the salvaged load. In fact, this lex was a customary law throughout the Hellenistic world. Specifically, the damaged party could demand his share of compensation from the mariner in a service contract suit ( actio locati), while the mariner could in turn demand a compensation from the oth…

Iader

(244 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Moesi, Moesia (τὰ Διάδωρα; tà Diádōra). Liburnian foundation of the Iron Age, later the most important city of Liburnia in the province of Dalmatia, modern Zadar (Italian Zara) in Croatia (Mela 2,57; Plin. HN 3,140 colonia Iader, cf. 141; 152; It. Ant. 272,1f.; cf. 496,7; 497,2; CIL III 2925). The inhabitants ( Iadertini) fought with Caesar against Pompey (Bell. Alex. 42). I. probably became a Roman colonia ( colonia Iulia; earlier documented as a conventus civium Romanorum) under Caesar. Traces of centuriatio…

Iaitia

(28 words)

Author(s): Falco, Giulia (Athens)
[German version] (Ἰαιτία; Iaitía). Town in Sicily (Diod. Sic. 22,10,4; 23,18; Steph. Byz. s. v. I.; cf. HN 148), probably identical to  Ietae. Falco, Giulia (Athens)

Ialemus

(96 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Ἰάλεμος; Iálemos). Son of  Apollo and the Muse  Calliope, thus the brother of several mythical singers:  Hymenaus,  Linus,  Orpheus (schol. Eur. Rhes. 985). Just as Hymenaus is a personification of the wedding song and Linus of the dirge, so I. is the personification of those dirges that, poetically, are called iálemoi. The myth explains this either with I.'s early death which gives cause for lament (as for Linus) (Pind. fr. 139,8), or with I.'s invention of the dirge. He is occasionally identified with Linus (Schol. Eur. Or. 1390). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)

Iallius

(99 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] M.I.M. f. Volt(inia tribu) Bassus Fabius Valerianus. Senator, who originated from Alba Helviorum in Narbonensis. In AD 156-159 he was in charge of Pannonia inferior as praetorian governor (AE 1976, 542; RMD II 102; 103). Cos. suff. shortly thereafter; curator operum publicorum in 161; consular governor of Moesia inferior; then comes Augustorum during the Parthian War. At the end of his career he was consular governor of Pannonia superior, where he made peace with invading Germanic tribes (Cass. Dio 71,3,1; PIR2 J 4). Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography Kolb, Bauver…

Ialmenus

(87 words)

Author(s): Visser, Edzard (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰάλμενος; Iálmenos). Son of  Ares and  Astyoche. Along with his twin brother  Ascalaphus [2], he led the Minyan contingent at Troy (Hom. Il. 2, 511), and is therefore also mentioned as a suitor of  Helen (Apollod. 3,130). After the capture of Troy, he makes his home in the Crimean region with Minyan settlers (Pherecydes, FGrH 3 F 143; Str. 9,2,42). Like his brother, I. was probably a figure of pre-Iliadic myth. Visser, Edzard (Basle) Bibliography W. Kullmann, Die Quellen der Ilias, 1960, 70f. Kamptz, 252.

Ialysus

(372 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Dark Ages | Mycenaean culture and archaeology | Persian Wars | Delian League (Ἰάλυσος; Iálysos). City on the north coast of the island of Rhodes; with  Lindus and  Camirus one of the three ancient cities of Rhodes. Situated c. 15 km south-west of Rhodes city, on the western slope of the 267 m-high mountain Filerimos (ancient name Achaía, Diod. Sic. 5,57,6; Ath. 8,360e), which functions as the acropolis of I. Settlement and necropolis from the Mycenaean period at the present-day village of Trianda. …

Iambe

(142 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰάμβη; Iámbē). Maid in the house of  Celeus, where  Demeter, mourning her abducted daughter Persephone, accepts nothing but a simple chair, which I. offers to her (H. Hom. 2,192-197; reverse ritual related to thrónōsis, placing the initiant on a foot stool [1]). I. makes Demeter laugh with her cheeky jokes and provocative insults, thus improving her mood (H. Hom. 2,202-204, cf. SH 680,51ff.). This reflects the cultic practice of aischrologia (ritual insult). Evidently, there is a connection between the mythical figure of I. and the literary genre …

Iambia

(115 words)

Author(s): Pahlitzsch, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰαμβία κώμη; Iambía kṓmē). Port town on the western coast of the Arabian peninsula, according to Ptolemy belonging to the territory of the Arsae (Ἄρσαι, Ptol. 6,7,3). I. is probably also identical with the island of Iambe, which, according to Plin. HN 6,168, lies off Berenice but is otherwise unknown. While the history of I. during the Hellenistic and Roman-Byzantine periods is largely unknown, the town achieved some importance under the Arab name of Yanbuʿ al-baḥr as the port of Medina (Ἰάθριππα; láthrippa/Yaṯrib), especially for pilgrim traffic. …

Iambics

(5 words)

see  Metre;  Iambographers

Iambic shortening

(5 words)

see  Phonetics

Iamblichus

(2,195 words)

Author(s): Gundel, Hans Georg (Gießen) | Brisson, Luc (Paris) | Fusillo, Massimo (L'Aquila) | Galli, Lucia (Florence)
(Ἰάμβλιχος; Iámblichos). Personal name (regarding the form cf. [1]). [German version] [1] Syro-Arab ruler, middle of 1st cent. BC I., Syro-Arab ruler, probably identical with Phylarchus I of Arethusa and Emesa who was mentioned by Cicero (Fam. 15,1; 2). He was executed in 31 BC outside Actium in the army of Anthony. In AD 20 Augustus returned Emesa to his homonymous son (Cass. Dio 50,13,7; 51,2,2; cf. Str. 16,753). Gundel, Hans Georg (Gießen) Bibliography 1 Schürer 1, 234f., 25. [German version] [2] Neoplatonist, 3rd/4th cent. AD Neoplatonist of the 3rd/4th cents. AD Brisson, Luc (Pa…

Iambographers

(1,272 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] A. Archaic and Classical Poets Among archaic Greek poets,  Archilochus,  Semonides and  Hipponax were regarded as the earliest authors of iambics ( íamboi), followed by  Ananius and, later in the 5th century BC,  Hermippus [1]. The term iambopoioí is found not before the Byzantine lexica. Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) [German version] B. Term and metrics ί̓αμβος ( íambos) seems, although its earliest use (Archil. 215 W) is not decisive, initially to identify a type of poem defined by content (cf. Pl. Leg. 935e) rather than by metre (cf. Hdt. 1…

Iambulus

(277 words)

Author(s): Fusillo, Massimo (L'Aquila)
[German version] (Ἰαμβοῦλος; Iamboûlos). In his library of world history (2,55-60),  Diodorus [18] Siculus mentions a merchant I., who, while on a voyage in Arabia, was carried off to a blissful island by Ethiopians, who thereby practised a purification ritual that was more than 20 generations old. The description of the island (which might be Sri Lanka) contains all the characteristics of an ancient utopia: an ideal climate, unusual fertility and a communist social structure. There are paradoxical…

Iamus

(194 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Ἴαμος; Íamos). Forefather of the Elean family of seers named Iamidai, who were active in Olympia alongside the  Clytidae (Hdt. 9,33) up to the fall of the sanctuary. They usually read prophecies in the flames of the sacrificial fire (cf. Pind. Ol. 8,2f.), but Thrasybulus invented divination from the intestines of dogs (Paus. 6,2,4). Their prophecies were also expressed in detailed oracles ( lógia) (Paus. 3,11,6). They were closely connected to Sparta (where the tomb of the Iamidai was located, Paus. 3,12,8), although their service to Messene…

Ianiculum

(104 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] One of the seven hills of Rome ( Roma), located on the right bank of the Tiber and already during the Republican period connected to the  Campus Martius by four bridges. Because of its military significance, the I. was incorporated into the ager Romanus at an early date (Cass. Dio 37,27,3 - 37,28,1). The name I. probably refers to a cultic site of Ianus. In the later Republic this hill, which was traversed by the via Aurelia was the location of several large  gardens ( horti Agrippinae; horti Caesaris). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography P. Liverani, s.v. I., LTUR …

Ianira

(28 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰάνειρα; Iáneira, ‘virility’).  Nereid (Hom. Il. 18,47; Apollod. 1,12) or  Oceanid (Hes. Theog. 356), one of Persephone's playmates (H. Hom. 2,421). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Ianitor

(7 words)

see  Wedding customs and rituals

Iannes and Iambres

(104 words)

Author(s): Domhardt, Yvonne (Zürich)
[German version] (Iamnes and Mambres). The pseudepigraphic names of Iannes and Iambres are based on Ex 7,8ff. and was widely received: the two unnamed Egyptian magicians who appear in Exodus as opponents of  Moses and Aaron, are referred to as Iannes and Iambres (the spelling varies depending on whether the source is Greek, Latin or Hebrew) in Jewish, Greek and Roman texts, the NT and other Christian documents. The Iannes and Iambres material was also treated in Rabbinic and Targumic (Targum Ps.-Jonathan) literature. Domhardt, Yvonne (Zürich) Bibliography A. Pietersma (ed.), The A…

Ianthe

(31 words)

Author(s): Schulte-Altedorneburg, Jörg (Marburg)
[German version] (Ἰάνθη; Iánthē, ‘violet blossom’). Daughter of  Oceanus and  Tethys (Hes. Theog. 349; Hyg. Fab. praef. 6; Paus. 4,30,4); playmate of  Persephone (H. Hom. 2,418). Schulte-Altedorneburg, Jörg (Marburg)

Ianuarius Nepotianus

(134 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] Revisor of the collection of exempla by  Valerius Maximus for rhetoric instruction, probably from the 4th cent. AD (based on linguistic arguments [1]). While the original organization was maintained, there were stylistic revisions and additions - partially from Cicero (cf. 7,3; 9,24 etc.). A more complete copy of the excerpt, which has survived in the Codex unicus ( Vaticanus Latinus 1321, s. XIV) only up to Val. Max. 3,2,7, was used still by Landolfus Sagax ( c.1000). Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance) Bibliography 1 F. Buecheler, Kleine Schriften 3, 1930, 331-335 (11906…

Ianus

(1,407 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
The Roman god of passage in a topographical, temporal and figurative sense. His name is derived from ianua (‘passage, gate’) and is connected with  Ianiculum. The name refers to the god as well as to the cultically relevant gates connected to him. Iconographical representations begin in the Republican period, depicting I. usually with two faces, occasionally with four ( bifrons, quadrifrons). [German version] A. Cult centres His cult is almost exclusively public and political, only two private dedications to him are extant. Two old altars of I. in Rome are att…

Iao

(4 words)

see  Yahweh

Iapetus

(185 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἰαπετός; Iapetós). The etymology is uncertain, perhaps ‘the one hurled down’ (on ἰάπτειν; iáptein, ‘to hurl’ [1]). The often postulated connection to OT Japheth, the third son of Noah (Gen. 5,32 et passim), cannot be proven [2; 3]. I. is the titan who was hurled by Zeus into Tartarus along with  Kronos (Hom. Il. 8,479). Son of  Gaia and  Uranus (Hes. Theog. 134). He fathered the sons  Atlas [2],  Menoetius,  Prometheus and Epimetheus with the Oceanid Clymene (Hes. Theog. 507-511). Among others, Asia (Apollod. 1…

Iapis

(69 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] Son of  Iasus and favourite of Apollo. The god wants to grant him the gift of prophecy, of playing the lyre and of accurate archery, but I. asks him for the art of healing instead so that he can save his father's life. With the help of Venus, he heals Aeneas' wounds (Verg. Aen. 12,391ff.; Serv. Aen. 12,391 (Iapyx); Macrob. Sat. 5,15,12). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Iapodes

(322 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] Indo-European people attested since the 9th/8th cents. BC, often erroneously classified as Illyrians, settled in Lika, the Karst plains of Gacko, Ličko, Krbavsko (western Croatia), on the Una near Bihać (western Bosnia) and Notranjska (Inner Carniolia/Slovenia). Administratively, they were part of the conventus Scardonitanus of the province of  Illyricum, later Dalmatia. The Zrmanja and Velebit mountains separated them from the  Liburni in the south. These they fought in the 3rd cent. BC with temporary success for access …

Iapyges, Iapygia

(735 words)

Author(s): Lombardo, Mario (Lecce)
[German version] People and region in the extreme south-east of Italy (modern Puglia). First mentioned by Hecataeus (FGrH 1 F 86f.) together with the unidentified settlements of Eleútioi (Ἐλεύτιοι), Peukaíoi (Πευκαῖοι, possibly equivalent to Πευκέτιοι; Peukétioi) and the pólis Chandánē (πόλις Χανδάνη). Hecataeus (loc. cit.) may also mean the I. with ‘town in Italia’ (πόλις ἐν τῆι Ἰταλίαι; pólis en tēi Italíai). According to Hdt. 4,99 the peninsula south of the isthmus between Tarentum and Brundisium was the acroterium of I. [7. 170-172]. Antiochus (FGrH 5…

Iasdius

(112 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] L.I. Aemilianus Honoratianus Postumus Son of Frater Arvalis, 2nd cent. AD Son of I. [2]. Frater Arvalis AD 240-241. CIL VI 41225. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography Scheid, Collège 464ff. [German version] [2] L.? I. Domitianus Senator, homo novus, praetor, several magistr. Entered the Senate as homo novus. After being a praetor he commanded two legions, became curator viae Aemiliae and simultaneously praefectus alimentorum. Was praetorian governor and suffect consul between about AD 215 and 225. Subsequently, consular legate of Germania i…

Iasion

(483 words)

Author(s): Baudy, Gerhard (Constance)
[German version] (Ἰασίων; Iasíōn, also Ἰάσιος; Iásios and Ἴασος; Íasos). An adolescent hero from the realm of agricultural mysteries. According to a tradition from Crete, I. fathers  Plutus (personification of a wealth of grain) with  Demeter on a thrice ploughed fallow field; for this, Zeus kills him with lightning (Hom. Od. 5,125-128; Hes. Theog. 969-974; cf. schol. Theoc. 3,49-51d; Ov. Am. 3,10,25ff.). The myth explains the emergence of agriculture after the flood (schol. Hom. Od. 5,125). Older resear…

Iaso

(4 words)

see  Hygieia

Iason

(2,023 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier) | Cobet, Justus (Essen) | Wandrey, Irina (Berlin) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Ἰάσων; lásōn). [German version] [1] Leader of the Argonauts Thessalian hero from  Iolcus, leader of the  Argonauts, participant in the Calydonian Hunt (Apollod. 1,68), son of  Aeson [1] and Polymela (Hes. Cat. 38-40; Apollod. 1,107) or  Alcimede (Pherecydes 3 F 104 FGrH; Apoll. Rhod. 1,47); brother of  Promachus (Apollod. 1,143); with  Hypsipyle, he fathered  Euneus [1] (Hom. Il. 7,468) and Nebrophonos (Apollod. 1,115), and with  Medea, he fathered Medeus (Hes. Theog. 1001),  Mermerus [3] and Pheres (Apollod. 1,146). Having been raised by  Chiron (Hes. Cat. 40), I. lives…

Iasus

(1,066 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle) | Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
(Ἴασος/Ἰάσιος; Íasos/Iásios). [German version] [1] Several kings of Argus Kings of Argus: a) son of Argus and Evadne, father of Agenor (Apollod. 2,3), b) son of Argus and Ismene, father of  Io (ibid. 2,5), c) son of Triopas, bother of Agenor, father of Io (Paus. 2,16,1). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [2] Father of Atalante Arcadian, son of Lycurgus and Cleophile, brother of Ancaeus, Epochus, and Amphidamas, husband of Minyas' daughter Clymene, father of  Atalante (Hes. Theog. 1288; Callim. H. 3,216; Apollod. 3,105; 109). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [3] Leader of the …

Iathrippa see Yatrib

(6 words)

see  Yaṭrīb

Iatraleiptes

(106 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Masseur, a profession that seems to have become fashionable in the 1st cent. AD (e.g. CIL 6,9476) but the linking of medicine and gymnastics extends as far back as Herodicus [1] of Selymbria (5th cent. BC). Trimalchio was treated by three aliptae (Petron. Sat. 28). Pliny considers this entire branch of medicine a form of quackery (HN 29,4-5). Vespasian however guaranteed all who practiced this art various privileges (FIRA 1,77) and Pliny the Younger managed to persuade Trajan to confer Roman (and Alexandrian) citizenship to his Egyptian iatraleiptes Harpocrates, w…

Iatrocles

(282 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Engels, Johannes (Cologne) | Binder, Gerhard (Bochum)
(Ἰατροκλῆς; Iatroklês). [German version] [1] Athenian, oligarch, 4th cent. BC Athenian, fled in 411 BC after the pro-democratic uprising of the Athenian fleet off Samos with the trierarch  Eratosthenes [1] and others, when the fleet was operating in the Hellespont, to Athens, where he supported the oligarchy (Lys. 12,42). Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) Bibliography Traill, PAA 531050. [German version] [2] Son of Pasiphon, approx. 350 BC Son of Pasiphon, in 348 BC captured by  Philippus II during the conquest of  Olynthus but then released (Aeschin. Leg. 15-16…

Iatromaia

(95 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (‘birth-helper’, ‘midwife’). Midwifery was usually practiced by women but was not exclusively in their hands. A Parian inscription, for example, records two male birth-helpers (IG 12,5,199) and the preserved treatises on midwifery address a male readership. Iatromaia as an occupational name appears in two Roman inscriptions of the 3rd and 4th cents. AD (CIL 6,9477f.); in one, a Valeria Verecunda is named as the ‘first iatromaia in her region’, an epithet that seems to refer to the quality of her work rather than a position in a collegium.  Midwife Nutton, Vivian (Lon…

Iatromathematics

(982 words)

Author(s): Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[German version] A. Definition Iatromathēmatiká (Herm. 1,387,1 Ideler) or nosoúntōn perignostiká ek tês mathēmatikês epistḗmēs (ibid. 1,430,2-3) etc. is the term for the medical implications of astrology, i.e. the recognition of a nosological predisposition of patients or a prognosis of current illnesses, connected with prevention or therapy, depending on the case. Touwaide, Alain (Madrid) [German version] B. Sources The books on which iatromathematics is based are the alleged revelations of  Hermes, who was possibly assisted by Asclepius. These revela…

Iatros

(155 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
(Greek ἰατρός; iatrós, ‘physician’). [German version] [1] Physician Physician,  Medicine. Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) [German version] [2] Epiclesis of Apollo Epiclesis of  Apollo as healing god, esp. common in the Ionian east and the Greek colonies along the western coast of the Black Sea. In Olbia, Apollo I. has replaced the Milesian Apollo Delphinios from the Hellenistic period. This form of Apollo was adopted as Apollo Medicus in early Republican Rome. Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) [German version] [3] Title of four Att. healing heroes Functional name and title of four Attic he…

Iatrosophistes

(216 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Originally meaning a teacher of medicine (esp. in Alexandria), iatrosophistes could later refer to any experienced practitioner ( medicus sapientissimus, Corpus Glossatorum Latinorum 3,600,32 Goetz), either in orthodox medicine (e.g.  Agnellus, In Galeni De sectis commentarium 33) or in the magical arts of healing (Ps.-Callisthenes, Vita Alexandri 1,3) [1]. Contrary to the emendation by von Arnim in Dion. Chrys. 33,6, the term was probably not coined before the late 4th cent. AD (Epiphanius, Adversu…

Iavolenus

(302 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] [1] C.I. Calvinus Geminius Kapito Cornelius Pollio Squilla Q. Vulkacius Scuppidius Verus Senator under Hadrian and Antoninus Pius, cos. suff. Senator, who had a prolonged praetorian career under Hadrian and Antoninus Pius, ending as governor in Lusitania, proconsul in Baetica and consul suffectus. ILS 1060; PIR2 J 13. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] C. Octavius Tidius Tossianus L.I. Priscus Roman jurist, 2nd cent. AD Jurist, successor of Caelius Sabinus ( Arulenus [1]) and predecessor of  Fulvius [II 2] Aburnius Valens as head of th…

Iaxartes

(144 words)

Author(s): Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin)
[German version] River in western Central Asia, modern Syr Darya, 2,860 km long; rises at the Taedyk pass in the eastern Altai Mountains. After flowing northwards for a short distance it takes in the Naryn River, which originates not far from Lake Issyk-Kul, then enters the plains of Kazakhstan south-west of Tashkent (where it becomes navigable) and flows into the  Aral Sea (Amm. Marc. 23,6,59). The indigenous Scythians called the I. Silis or Orxantes, Alexander the Great called it Tanais (Plin. HN 6,49; Arr. Anab. 3,30-7-8 et passim, but also I. Arr. Anab. 7,16,3 among others), …

Iazyges, Iazuges

(208 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Ἰάζυγες; Iázyges). Iranian-Sarmatian tribe, first documented around the birth of Christ. They probably settled from the 3rd cent. BC at the earliest on the  Maeotis east of the Tanais in the area of the Roxolani (Ptol. 3,7; Amm. Marc. 22,8,31). In the 1st cent. BC a branch of the I. turned towards the southwest, crossed the Carpathians and settled on the plains between the lower Danube and the Tibiscus (later the province of Pannonia; cf. Ov. Pont. 4,7,9; Tr. 2,191; Ἰάζυγες μετανάσται/ lázyges metanástai with a list of the Iazygian cities, Ptol. 7,1f.; Str. 7…

Ibas

(4 words)

see  Hiba

Iberia

(567 words)

Author(s): Plontke-Lüning, Annegret (Jena)
[German version] [1] Country in the centre of southern Caucasia (Ἰβηρία; Ibēría, Str. 11,3,1-6; Ptol. 5,10,1-2; Georgian Kʿartʿli, Parthian Virčan, Armenian Virkʿ). Country in the centre of southern Caucasia, bordering on the Greater  Caucasus in the north, the Likh Range in the west which runs north-south from the Greater to the Lesser Caucasus, the Kura-Aras Lowland in the east and the Lesser Caucasus in the south, especially the southern and western frontiers being fluid; approximately modern eastern Georgia. Unt…

Iberian archaeology

(6 words)

see  Pyrenean peninsula

Iberian, Iberian peninsula

(6 words)

see  Hispania

Iberians

(89 words)

Author(s): Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
[German version] (Ἴβηροι/ Íbēroi, Ἴβηρες/ Íbēres). I. and Iberia (Ἰβηρία/ Ibēría), as terms for the inhabitants and country of East Georgia, occur only in Graeco-Roman and Byzantine sources; possibly etymologically related to virkʿ (Armenian) or Sáspeires (Σάσπειρες, Hdt. 4,37; 40) [1. 146]. Iberia was bordered in the north by  Sarmatia, in the west by  Colchis, in the south by Greater Armenia ( Armenia) and in the east by  Albania [1] (Ptol. 5,10,1f.). Armenia;  Georgia, Georgians;  Georgian Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) Bibliography 1 O. Lordkipanidse, Archäologie in Geor…

Iberus

(162 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
(Hiberus). Name of two Spanish rivers, derived from the people of the same name, not - as ancient scholars (Plin. HN 3,21; Just. Epit. 44,1,2) believed - the other way around [1. 307-315]. [German version] [1] Modern Ebro Modern Ebro. All sources agree that the ancient I., with its tributaries, corresponds almost completely to the modern Ebro. The single difference: the ancient river was navigable (Plin. HN 3,21) as far as Vareia (modern Varea, east of Logroño), today only as far as Tortosa (other, newer views contradict this ident…

Ibex

(146 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] The ibex ( Capra ibex L.), which belongs to the genus of goats, lives in the high mountains of Europe (Alps, Pyrenees) and in Palestine. It was not known to the Greeks; the Romans mention it as ibex only since Pliny (HN 8,214). Where Isidore (Orig. 12,1,17) got the nonsensical claim that the ibex would throw themselves from the peaks when enemies approached and catch themselves unharmed by their horns is unknown. Mass capture and use in arena fights is recorded for the emperors Gordianus (SHA Gord. 3,7) and Probus (S…

Ibis

(221 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
(Egyptian hbj > Greek ἶβις; îbis). [German version] I. Egypt The ibis was considered a sacred bird (Hdt. 2, 65; 67; 75 and other ancient writers) in Egypt, where three species were found. Above all, the ‘Sacred ibis’ ( Threskiornis aethiopicus) was worshipped as the holy animal of  Thot, god of the moon and writing, and often represented. Ibis burials are known starting in the New Kingdom; in the Late Period, there were breeding colonies and animal cemeteries with mummified ibises everywhere in Egypt, particularly extensive in the chief cult centres of Thot. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) B…

Ibycus

(633 words)

Author(s): Robbins, Emmet (Toronto)
[German version] (Ἴβυκος; Íbykos), born in Rhegium in the 6th cent. BC, the second important poet of Magna Graecia after  Stesichorus. He came to Samos in the 54th Olympiad (564-561 BC) (Suda: ‘when Polycrates, the tyrant's father, ruled there’, should probably be corrected to Πολυκράτους, which would result in more common Greek, and would then say - in accordance with Hdt. 3,39, who names Aeaces as the father: ‘when the father of the tyrant Polycrates ruled there’). Eusebius' dating differs from t…

Icarian Sea

(235 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Ἰκάριος πόντος; Ikários póntos). Southeastern part of the Aegean Sea, from Samos to Mykonos (Plin. HN 4,51) respectively from Icarus, with Corassiae (Corseae, modern Fourni) and Samos, via Patmos, Leros and Kalymnos to Kos (Str. 10,5,13). References: Hom. Il. 2,145 (Ἰκάριος πόντος); Sen. Hercules Oetaeus 694; Auson. epist. 23 ( Icarius pontus); Ov. Fast. 4,283; 566; Plin. HN 4,68; 6,215 ( Icarium); Hdt. 6,96; Str. 2,5,21; Ptol. 5,2,1-6; 17,2; Diod. Sic. 4,77,6 (Ἰκάριον πέλαγος); Claud. in Eutropium 2,265 ( Icarium pelagus). The Icarian Sea (IS) breaks on the …

Icarium

(272 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
(Ἰκάριον/ Ikárion; Ἰκαρία/ Ikária only Steph. Byz. s.v. Ἰ.). [German version] [1] Att. mesogeia deme of the phyle Aegeis Attic mesogeia deme of the phyle Aegeis, from 307/6 to 201 of Antigonis, after 200 BC of Attalis, on the north-east slope of mount  Pentelicon (modern Dioniso). Only one deme named I. is recorded [7. 115 no. 16]. With five (six) bouleutaí, medium-sized, but (through cult business?) prosperous [9. 160 n. 77, 163]. In 1888/9, the Dionysus sanctuary [9. 221] with one of the oldest theatres in Attica [2; 3; 8] and archaic cult image of Dionysus (IG I3 254, IG II2 2851 [5; 9. …

Icarius

(329 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
(Ἰκάριος; Ikários). [German version] [1] Att. hero Attic hero, whose cult (probably in the deme Icaria) is recorded as early as the 5th cent. (IG I3 253, 6.9); sacrifices to him, his daughter  Erigone [1] and their dog are mentioned by Ael. NA 7,28. His myth is known in various facets since the ‘Erigone’ of Eratosthenes, which has survived only in fragments (Hyg. Poet. Astr. 2,4; Apollod. 3,192f., etc.). The god  Dionysus comes to I., is fed by him, and gives him the first wine as thanks. When I. serves this to his nei…

Icarus

(654 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen)
(Ἴκαρος; Íkaros). [German version] [1] Son of Daedalus Son of  Daedalus [1]. Held captive on Crete by  Minos, Daedalus builds a pair of wings each for himself and I., which they use to escape Minos. However, I., despite the warnings of his father, comes too close to the sun; this melts the wax in his wings, he crashes near the island of  Icarus [2]/Icaria and drowns. Daedalus (or Hercules, Apollod. 2,132) buries him; the island and the sea around it are named after I. The well-known version of the story is formulated in Ov. Met. 8,183-235 (cf. Apollod. Epitome 1,12f.); a Pompei…

Icauna

(41 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] Left side-arm of the river Seine, modern Yonne, also the name of the river goddess (CIL XIII 2921: dea Icauna, votive inscriptions from Autessiodurum; Vita S. Germani 12, late 5th cent. AD: flumen Ycaunense). Lafond, Yves (Bochum)

Iccius

(54 words)

Author(s): Will, Wolfgang (Bonn)
[German version] Ruler of the  Remi ( primus civitatis), allied with Rome since 57 BC; in the same year, as he was in command of Bibrax, he held the city against an assault by the Belgae until the arrival of assistance from Rome (Caes. B Gall. 2,3,1; 6,4; 7,1).  Caesar Will, Wolfgang (Bonn)

Iccus

(5 words)

see  Olympic champions

Iceland

(1,210 words)

Author(s): Kreutzer, Gert (Cologne)
[English version] Only after its relatively late Christianization in 1000, and the founding of bishoprics (Skálholt in 1056, Hólar in 1106) and monasteries (Þingeyrar in 1112, Munkaþverá in 1155, etc.) [7] did Iceland seek and obtain access to the ancient-Christian tradition of education, with its Latin-speaking written culture as transmitted by Church and scholarship [8; 13]. Thus the first original works (primarily historiographical and hagiographical in content) were composed in Latin; however,…

Icelus

(143 words)

Author(s): ,
[1] Brother of Morpheus see Morpheus [2] Freedman of Galba [2] Full name (Ser. Sulpicius) I. Marcianus. Freedman of Galba [2], who had remained behind in Rome during Galba's governorship in Tarraconensis. Imprisoned by Nero following Galba's acclamation; freed after Nero's death, he rushed to Spain in only seven days to bring Galba the news. He received the gold ring of the equestrian order from Galba and probably the restitutio natalium. He exerted great influence on Galba, allegedly was able to dominate him - although this opinion is more likely to be a reflecti…

Icelus I (gk.)

(6 words)

see  Morpheus

Icelus II (rom.)

(122 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Full name (Ser. Sulpicius) I. Marcianus. Freedman of  Galba [2], who had remained behind in Rome during Galba's governorship in Tarraconensis. Imprisoned by Nero following Galba's acclamation; freed after Nero's death, he rushed to Spain in only seven days to bring Galba the news. He received the gold ring of the equestrian order from Galba and probably the restitutio natalium. He exerted great influence on Galba, allegedly was able to dominate him - although this opinion is more likely to be a reflection of social prejudice in the source…

Iceni

(184 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Celtic tribe in the area of Norfolk and Suffolk (south-eastern England). First mentioned under the name Cenimagni as one of the tribes that submitted to Caesar in AD 54 (Caes. B Gall. 5,21,1). At the time of the conquest of Britain by Claudius (AD 43), they were prepared to accept the alliance with Rome. In AD 47 they rebelled and were subjugated, however, they retained the status of a client kingdom (Tac. Ann. 12,31). After the death of their King Prasutagus c. AD 59, their entire territory was incorporated into the Roman administration, not only the half tha…

Ichana

(117 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] (Ἴχανα; Íchana). Settlement on Sicily, fell under the rule of Syracusae (Steph. Byz. s.v. I.). Evidence: handle of a bronze kerykeion, with the inscription Ιχανινοδαμοσιον; silver hēmílitron (obverse horned head, personification of a river, to its right on some impressions ΣΙΧΑ, on the reverse the bow of a ship with the legend ΝΙΚΑ, datable to the end of the 5th cent. BC; I., therefore, celebrated a naval victory); in a Siculan inscription from Herbessus is ΘΙΚΑΝΑ. Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata) Bibliography G. Manganaro, in: JNG 33, 1984, 31-33 Id., Al…

Ichara

(122 words)

Author(s): Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰχάρα; Ichára, modern Failaka). Island in the Persian Gulf, on the east coast of Arabia. The island, mentioned in Ptolemy (6,7,47 N), is today generally regarded as a variant of  Icarus. While the identification fluctuated between Failaka, Kharg and Qaru for a long time, the equation of Icarus (and thus Ichara?) with Failaka has meanwhile been confirmed by inscriptions. According to Arrian (Anab. 7,20,2-3), the island received its name from Alexander, after an island in the Aegean…

Ichnae

(112 words)

Author(s): Kessler, Karlheinz (Emskirchen)
[German version] (Ἴχναι; Ichnai). Fortified settlement on the Balissus (Balīḫ̣); according to  Isidorus of Charax, situated between Alagma and  Nicephorium (Isidorus of Charax 1 Schoff; Plut. Crassus 25,17; Cass. Dio 40,12,2). Supposedly a Macedonian foundation; despite a similarity to Greek place names, the name may be identical with the old Babylonian Aḫūnā [1. 6].  Licinius Crassus won a skirmish near I. in 54 BC against the Parthian satrap Silaces. Publius, the son of Crassus, was advised to fl…

Ichneumon

(275 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] Egyptian mongoose ( Herpestes ichneumon, first mentioned under the name ἰχνεύμων by Aristot. Hist. an. 6,35,580a 25, but also ἰχνευτής/-ήρ; ichneutḗs/-ḗr), viverrid with dog-like feeding habits, in Egypt and, according to Vitr. De arch. 8,2,7, also in Morocco. The ichneumon stays mostly in the reeds and likes to raid poultry farms. In Egypt, it was known as the ferocious enemy of the crocodile, into whose open jaws it was said to creep and kill by consumption of its entrails (Str. 17,812; Diod. Sic. …

Ichor

(165 words)

Author(s): Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[German version] (ἰχώρ; ichṓr). The word has been connected to the Aramaic or Hebrew root meaning ‘dignity’, ‘splendour’, with possible etymological overlap of the Sumerian root meaning ‘blood’ and the Akkadian root meaning ‘to pour’. In Homer (Il. 5,340; cf. 416), the word denotes the lifeblood of the gods as opposed to regular blood that is produced by eating bread and drinking wine. Ichor also appears in Aeschylus (Ag. 1479f., 458 BC), where the word denotes a fluid which is discharged from wounds that will not close. In the 4th cent., it is more common …

Ichthyas

(71 words)

Author(s): Döring, Klaus (Bamberg)
[German version] (Ἰχθύας; Ichthýas). Pupil of Euclides [2] of Megara, 4th cent. BC, member of the  Megarian School; eponymous character in a dialogue of  Diogenes [14] of Sinope. I. is usually identified with the man called in the MSS Icthydias or Ychtyas, who lost his life in an uprising against his home town (Megara?) (Tert. Apol. 46,16). Döring, Klaus (Bamberg) Bibliography 1 K. Döring, Die Megariker, 1972, 15, 91-94, 100-101 2 SSR II H.

Ichthyes (Pisces)

(5 words)

see  Constellations

Ichthyocentaur

(4 words)

see  Triton

Ichthyophagi

(131 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἰχθυοφάγοι/ Ichthyophágoi, ‘fish-eaters’). Collective ethnographic term for coastal peoples who primarily live on fish. As a Utopian people residing at the ends of the then-known world, the I. are described as models of justice, but sometimes also as animal-like, living on a low civilizational level (Agatharchides of Cnidus, De Mari Erythro, fr. 31-49 = GGM 1, 129-141). Most frequently mentioned are the Ethiopian I. on the Red Sea, whom Herodotus reports as having been sent (in va…

Ichthys

(568 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Lienau, Cay (Münster)
[German version] [1] Fish Fish (Greek ἰχθῦς/ ichthŷs; Latin piscis) was a common food in Greece and Rome, certain fishes in Rome were even considered a luxury food. This explains the Greek curiosity about neighbouring cultures such as Egypt or Syria, where conspicuous food prohibitions were observed and generalized (priests in Egypt: Hdt. 2,37; Plut. De Is. et Os. 7, 353b; Plut. Symp. 8,8,2; Syria: Ov. Fast. 2,473f.; Porph. De abstinentia 2,61 etc.) that probably relate to the worship of fish in these cu…

Icilius

(363 words)

Author(s): Müller, Christian (Bochum)
Name of a plebeian family, that probably already died out in the 4th cent. BC, according to the tradition known for its anti-patrician stance (Liv. 4,54,4). [German version] [1] I., L. People's tribune 456, 455 and 449 BC People's tribune in 456, 455, 449 BC (MRR 1,42; 48). In 456 he is said to have carried through the lex de Aventino publicando, which allocated the Aventine to the plebs (Liv. 3,31,1; 32,7; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 10,31,2-32,5); as the fiancé of  Verginia he bravely resisted the despotism of the decemvir Appius Claudius [I 5] (Liv. 3,44,3; 45,4-46,…

Iconium

(264 words)

Author(s): Belke, Klaus (Vienna)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Sassanids | Byzantium | Christianity | Xenophon | Zenobia | | Coloniae | Commerce | Ḫattusa | Asia Minor | Asia Minor | Rome (Ἰκόνιον; Ikónion, modern Konya). The most important city in Lycaonia developed out of a prehistoric settlement inhabited by the Phrygians (8th cent. BC); only in Xen. An. 1,2,19 is it mentioned as easternmost city of Phrygia, at the crossroads of major trading and military routes. In 25 BC, I. became part of the new province of Galatia along wit…

Iconoclasm

(10 words)

see  Constantinus [7] V.;  Leon III;  Syrian dynasty

Icorigium

(159 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt Roman road-station (It. Ant. 373,1: Egorigio; Tab. Peut. 3,1) where the Trier - Cologne road crossed the Kyll, modern Jünkerath. From the 1st cent. AD long-houses were built close to each other on both sides of the road, with the narrow side facing the street. Destroyed during the German invasions of the 3rd cent., protected in the late Constantinian period by a circular fortification (135 m diameter) with 13 round towers and two gateh…

Icos

(163 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen)
[German version] (Ἰκός; Ikós). Island, 62 km2 in size, in the northern Sporades, modern Hallonesos (also Chelidromia or Chilidromia); member of the  Delian League with a tribute of 1,500 drachmae, likewise of the  Athenian League. After the conclusion of peace between the Athenians and Philippus II in 338, the island came under Macedonian suzerainty; in Athenian possession from 42 BC to the late Roman Imperial period. After the fall of Constantinople, I. was under Venetian influence; after 1537 under…

Icosium

(141 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Commerce (Ἰκόσιον; Ikósion, Punic ʾj ksm, ‘island of the owls’?). Phoenician or Punic foundation in the later Mauretania Caesariensis, modern Algiers. References: Mela 1,31; Plin. HN 5,20; Ptol. 4,2,6; It. Ant. 15,5; Sol. 25,17 (with incorrect etymology); Amm. Marc. 29,5,16 (with allusion to this etymology); Geogr. Rav. 40,44; 88,12. A roman veterans' colony was founded at I. during the reign of  Juba II (Plin. HN 3,19; 5,20). Under Vespasian, the city became a colonia Latina (CIL VIII Suppl. 3, 20853). A h…

Icovellauna

(152 words)

Author(s): Euskirchen, Marion (Bonn)
[German version] Local Celtic goddess related to water by name and by the place of discovery. Four small plates of bronze or marble as well as remnants of an altar with dedications to Dea I. were uncovered inside (CIL XIII, 1.2, 4296-4298) and outside (CIL XIII, 1.2, 4294f.) of an octagonal well building in Sablon near Metz-Divodurum. The fact that a single marble plate for Dea I. was found in Trier, Altbachtal (CIL XIII, 1.2, 3644) does not refute the merely local significance of the goddess in the region of the  Mediomatrici. Euskirchen, Marion (Bonn) Bibliography W. Binsfeld et al., Kat…

Ictinus

(478 words)

Author(s): Knell, Heiner (Darmstadt)
[German version] (Ἰκτῖνος; Iktînos). Architect of the classical period. His greatest achievement is considered to be the Athenian  Parthenon (Str. 9,395-396; Paus. 8,41,9), erected 447-438 BC, which he designed apparently together with  Callicrates (Plut. Pericles 13,7), whose contribution has been emphasized more strongly recently [1]). With the otherwise unknown Carpon he is reputed to have composed a book about the Parthenon (Vitr. 7 praef. 12). Tradition has repeatedly mentioned I. as the archi…

Ictis

(143 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] British island connected to the mainland at low tide where, according to Diod. Sic. 5,22,2, the inhabitants of Belerion (Land's End in south-west-Britain) sold Tin from their mines - this was the beginning of the tin trade between Britannia and the Mediterranean region. The location of I. is still under debate. Possibilities include St. Michael's Mount in Mounts Bay, Cornwall [1. 176], which is connected to the mainland at low tide, and Mount Batten in the Plymouth Sound, Devon, w…

Ida

(165 words)

Author(s): Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen)
(Ἴδη; Ídē, Lat. Ida). [German version] [1] Nymph of the Ida mountains in the Troad Eponymous nymph of the  Ida mountains [2] in the Troad (Ps.-Plut. 13,3 = GGM 2,652), in Vergil (A. 9,177), mother of  Nisus, and a huntress; image with caption on the coins of Scamandria and Scepsis [1]. Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen) [German version] [2] Nymph of the Cret. Ida Eponymous nymph of the Cretan  Ida [1], daughter of Melisseus/Melissus or of Corybas, mother of the  Daktyloi Idaioi by Dactylus (schol. Apoll. Rhod. 1,1129) or Zeus (Stesimbrotus FGrH 107 F 12). Accor…

Ida

(439 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
(Ἴδη, Ἰδαῖον ὄρος; Ídē, Idaîon hóros). [German version] [1] Highest mountain range in Crete Highest mountain range in Crete, modern Psiloritis, with the peak Timios Stavros (2,456 m). Still heavily forested in antiquity (cf. the name I. = ‘wooded mountains’), predominantly with cypresses (Eur. Hipp. 1253; Theophr. Hist. pl. 3,2,6; 4,1,3; Plin. HN 16,142). Used early on for mining metals (FGrH 239,11; Diod. Sic. 5,64,5) and agriculture (Theophr. De ventis, fr. 5,13 Wimmer; [1]). The cave considered the birthpl…

Idaea

(163 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle) | Zingg, Reto (Basle)
(Ἰδαία; Idaía). [German version] [1] Epithet of Cybele One of many epithets of the mother of gods ( Cybele), named after her cult on the Phrygian  Ida [2] (e.g. Eur. Or. 1453; Str. 10,469). Walde, Christine (Basle) [German version] [2] Nymph of the Ida mountains Nymph of Ida [2] in Phrygia, wife of the river god Scamander, mother of  Teucer, the first king in the Troad, after whom the people of the Teucri are named (Apollod. 3,139; Diod. Sic. 4,75). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [3] Daughter of Dardanus Daughter of Dardanus, great-granddaughter of [2], second wife of  Phineu…

Idaeus

(243 words)

Author(s): Willi, Andreas (Basle) | Nünlist, René (Basle) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
(Ἰδαῖος; Idaîos). [German version] [1] Epithet of Zeus Epithet of  Zeus from the Ida on Crete (Eur. fr. 472 TGF; Inscr. Creticae 1,12,1) or near Troy (Hom. Il. 24,291; Verg. Aen. 7,139; in Celaenae: Plut. Mor. 306e f.) and of  Heracles as Daktylos I. and founder of the Olympic Games (Paus. 5,7,6ff.; 8,31,3; also in Elis and Erythrae: Paus. 6,23,3; 9,27,8). Willi, Andreas (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Chryse and Dardanus Son of Chryse and  Dardanus [1] with whom he emigrates from Arcadia across Samothrace to the  Ida mountains [2], which are said to be named af…

Idaioi Daktyloi

(6 words)

see  Daktyloi Idaioi

Idalium

(245 words)

Author(s): Senff, Reinhard (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Kypros (Ἰδάλιον; Idálion). Mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions of 672 BC, a Graeco-Phoenician city in the interior of Cyprus, known to ancient literature as a principal seat of the cult of Aphrodite (Theocr. 15,100; Verg. Aen. 1,681; 692). Inhabited since the late Bronze Age. Ruins close to modern Dhali, between Larnaka and Nicosia, with two acropoleis, a city wall, house remains and necropoleis [1]. In the sanctuaries of Anat-Athena, Rešef-Apollo…

Idas

(362 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Ἴδας; Ídas). Son of  Aphareus [1], king of Messene, and brother of  Lynceus. The Messenian pair of brothers is juxtaposed with the Spartan pair of brothers of the  Dioscuri as Apharetidai, reflecting the rivalries and disputes between Sparta and Messene. I. is characterized throughout as superhumanly strong (since Hom. Il. 9, 556) and quarrelsome, and is also regarded as son of Poseidon (Apollod. 3,117). While courting  Marpessa, the daughter of the river god Evenus at the same ti…

Ideas, theory of

(754 words)

Author(s): Szlezák, Thomas A. (Tübingen)
[German version] The modern (19th cent.) term for part of  Plato's ontology. Whenever there are many perceptible things of the same kind, there is an imperceptible ‘model’, conceivable only in thought, that explains the nature of the ‘copies’ and accounts for their existence. Plato calls this model the ‘idea’ (ἰδέα/ idéa, synonymous with εἶδος/ eîdos). The idea does not come into being and is eternal, immutable, uniform and indivisible, outside space and time; it is what it is, without qualification and ambiguity. (Pl. Symp. 211a; Pl. Phd. 247c et passim). It is at once that which i…

Idicra

(71 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Place in Numidia south of Milev-Cuicul line, the modern Azziz-ben-Tellis (It. Ant. 28,4). Two inscriptions tell of a tariff of sacrifices for the cult of African gods (CIL VIII 1, 8246f.); further inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 8243-8266. In the 4th and 5th cents. I. was an episcopal see (Optatus 2,18, p. 53,4; 19, p. 54,14; Notitia episcopatuum Numidiae 16a). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AAAlg, sheet 17, no. 214.

Idios Logos

(381 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] (Ἴδιος λόγος; Ídios lógos). The idios logos (IL) was set up under  Ptolemaeus VI as a ‘special account’ (first documented 5.1.162 BC, [1]). Almost all revenues from the sale of state property, especially abandoned or confiscated estates (ἀδέσποτα, γῆ ἐν ὑπολόγῳ / adéspota, gê en hypológōi) were paid into this account; by the 1st cent. BC at the latest there was an office πρὸς τῷ ἰδίῳ λόγῳ ( pròs tôi idíōi lógōi) responsible for the administration of the land confiscated in favour of the IL and for reselling it (account management and administration h…

Idiotes

(81 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle)
[German version] (ἰδιώτης; idiṓtēs). The term idiotes designated a private individual who did not hold any office and did not participate in political life; in the military field idiotes was a term commonly used by historians for the simple soldier as compared to those holding command (Xen. An. 1,3,11; 3,2,32; Pol. 5,60,3; Diod. Sic. 19,4,3). In the list of men from the Ptolemaic Egyptian army the simple soldier is designated as idiotes (e.g. P Hib. 1,30,21). Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle)

Idistaviso

(99 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Site of a battle between Teutons under  Arminius and Romans under  Germanicus. The latter had led his troops over the sea to the river Ems and further on land via the river Weser in the summer of AD 16. The Romans won the battle in the I. plain ( campus) between the Weser and hilly terrain (Tac. Ann. 2,16,1) I. cannot be localized but is generally assumed to be in the surroundings of Porta Westfalica. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography B. Rappaport, s.v. I., RE 9, 903-905 E. Koestermann, Die Feldzüge des Germanicus, in: Historia 6, 1957, 429-479, esp. 425-455.

Idmon

(234 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier)
(Ἴδμων; Ídmōn). [German version] [1] Seer Son of  Asteria [2] (daughter of the Thessalian  Lapith Coronus) and of Apollo (Val. Fl. 1,228ff.), father of  Thestor, grandfather of  Calchas (Pherecydes, FGrH 3 F 108.). The Argive  Abas [1] is named as his human ‘father’ (Apoll. Rhod. 1,139ff.; Orph. A. 187ff.; Hyg. Fab. 14,11). As a seer with a telling name (‘the one who knows’), what is apparently the original version of the myth of  Argonauts he takes part in the expedition despite his foreknowledge tha…

Idols

(5 words)

see  Cult image

Idomenae

(85 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Ἰδομεναί/ Idomenaí, Lat. Idomene, Eidomene). Town in the Amphaxitis region of Macedonia, on the road from Thessalonica to the Danube (Str. 8,8,5; Tab. Peut. 8,1), perhaps near the modern Marvinci. I. is already documented in the 5th cent. BC (Thuc. 2,100,3); in the 3rd cent. BC, it was visited by Delphic theōroí (‘sacred envoys’) [1] and was still known in the 6th cent. AD (Hierocles, Synekdemos 639,5). Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn) Bibliography 1 BCH 45, 1921, 17 Z. 68. F. Papazoglou, Les villes de Macédoine, 1988, 177.
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